back to article Bechtolsheim's baby Arista Networks soars in stock market debut

Arista Networks has gained in its stock market debut, likely causing some employees at networking giant Cisco's competitive intelligence team to put together some slides on what the implications of a wealthy, publicly-listed competitor are for networking incumbents. Arista's stock increased 33 per cent on its debut day to $57 …

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  1. Sanctimonious Prick
    Trollface

    Are They...

    NSA approved?

    1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge

      Re: Are They...

      Funny.

      They minted money because they jumped on new technology while Cisco milked the old.

      Cisco didn't have a 10GbE product offering and what they had was very, very expensive.

      Lets see what happens when Cisco wakes up to the competition.

      1. Mark 85 Silver badge

        Re: Are They...

        Lets see what happens IF Cisco wakes up to the competition.

        There, FTFY.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Pint

      Re: Are They...

      Hmmm... . their approach makes their networks a moving target which should make interesting time for the NSA. With really good monitoring you effectively create a giant honeypot.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Are They...

        With really good monitoring you effectively create a giant honeypot.

        Exactly right. Add to that a couple of tarpits to soak up attacker resources and a good dose of deception scripts (think Fred Cohen's DTK and whatever he came up next) and you could cook up a bit of a headache for the purveyors of the APT path into your information, be it criminal hackers or government ones (from a protection perspective there's little difference IMHO, only that the latter can also slap you with a legal demand if you piss them off too much).

        However, I see people laugh at Cisco for "sticking with the old" - actually, this is a fairly standard cycle. Someone comes up with something new, grabs the market, gets good income on it and grows big - at which point statis seems to set in, and the gap starts opening up for the next clever idea. A big company has two options: seek to buy out upstarts before they become a threat or suck them dry in court. The third option of innovating inside tends to die with the R&D budget.

        1. John Smith 19 Gold badge
          Unhappy

          Re: Are They...

          "Add to that a couple of tarpits to soak up attacker resources and a good dose of deception scripts (think Fred Cohen's DTK and whatever he came up next) and you could cook up a bit of a headache for the purveyors of the APT path into your information, be it criminal hackers or government ones (from a protection perspective there's little difference IMHO, only that the latter can also slap you with a legal demand if you piss them off too much)."

          True.

          One snoops "enabling security" is another criminal hackers back door.

        2. Fatman Silver badge

          Re: Are They...Option #3

          The third option of innovating inside tends to die with the R&D budget because of the need to fund the executive bonus pool .

          FTFY

  2. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

    A new paradign

    A staff of experts in the particular field of engineering actually building a high quality product with a strong demand from real customers who will rely on it for real work - and are willing to pay for it.

    Is this an entirely new business method ?

    Could we patent it ?

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