back to article Google brings futuristic Linux software CoreOS onto its cloud

Fans of new Linux operating system "CoreOS" can now run the lightweight tech on Google's main cloud service. This means developers who want a Linux OS that takes up just 168MB of RAM, runs all of its applications within containers, and is designed for marshaling mammoth clusters of computers, can now do so on top of Google's …

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  1. amanfromMars 1 Silver badge

    Universal Firmware Upgrades ..... SMARTR AI Software @ITsWork, REST and Play

    From our perspective, it's an intriguing partnership, and highlights that though CoreOS is a young technology it seems to be squinting at a software future that the rest of us can't quite see, yet. ®

    Others would advise, JC, and provide further sensitive information and intelligence for developments and projects which be pioneering a virtual reality aware future for creative placement of and replacement of presents which carry not the destructive baggage of ignorant pasts.

    You might like to ask Google if that be one of their future programs too, and if not, why not if it can be whenever it be available for global distribution? Such a failure to supply lead would indicate a business which only follows, and that can be led anywhere to do anything by anyone with leading information.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Universal Firmware Upgrades ..... SMARTR AI Software @ITsWork, REST and Play

      Desperately trying to remain relevant and thinking of new ways to compete by dropping their prices - while everyone ignores Google in this space and continues moving to Azure...

      1. RyokuMas Silver badge
        Black Helicopters

        Re: Universal Firmware Upgrades ..... SMARTR AI Software @ITsWork, REST and Play

        "everyone ignores Google in this space and continues moving to Azure..."

        Given that they're already reading people's emails, who would trust Google not to read their code?

  2. Mike Pellatt

    Someone fell for the autocorrect

    .....and Linux mainstay systems, which helps developers command a cluster of CoreOS machines.....

    You meant systemd there, not systems.

    I will not ignite a flameware here about the design of systemd......

    1. frank ly

      Re: Someone fell for the autocorrect

      You mentioned it. That could be the spark :)

      1. Destroy All Monsters Silver badge
        Paris Hilton

        Re: Someone fell for the autocorrect

        How does systemd help managing multiple machines though?

    2. Pookietoo

      Re: You meant systemd there, not systems.

      Perhaps you should have hit "Send corrections" rather than "Post your comment" ...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: You meant systemd there, not systems.

        > Perhaps you should have hit "Send corrections" rather than "Post your comment"

        And perhaps the correction link could point to an HTML form instead of a mailto: URL.

  3. Alan Brown Silver badge

    memory

    "This means developers who want a Linux OS that takes up just 168MB of RAM, "

    Once upon a time I used to run servers (web and mail) on 4Mb machines without hitting swap and only needed more if X got involved.

    Time have sure changed.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: memory

      Life before images and attachments was so much easier. You know, when the equivalent of facebook was wall.

      1. Tom 7 Silver badge

        Re: memory

        but it was a lot more pleasant to bash your head on!

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: memory- @Tom 7

          Bash? We didn't get no fancy bash. C shell and that was it. And we were glad to get it...

          1. Mike Pellatt

            Re: memory- @Tom 7

            C shell ?? Pah. That had history and in-line editing.

            Real sysadmins used the Bourne Shell (mostly coz I started off on AT&T System III and we didn't have the C shell...)

            1. e^iπ+1=0

              Bourne shell

              Also, if you write your shell scripts using Bourne shell they'll run pretty much anywhere, even today (think embedded devices etc).

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: memory

      I was gonna say 168MB of RAM is still a lot. Most of my machines run with 64MB of RAM - some 32MB. I remember when 16MB was brilliant. I don't think I'm old enough to have been able to run a POSIX OS on 4MB though. That is dope.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Joke

        Re: memory

        4mb what are you, some sort of newbie?

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