back to article Torygraph and Currant Bun stand by to repel freeloaders

The Daily Telegraph is to begin charging regular web readers for web access. The Telegraph doesn't use the term 'paywall' in its announcement, which is fair enough, really. The P-word is really a propaganda word, as the FT's M B Christie has pointed out: "Why don't we call it paying for content, just like paying for milk or …

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  1. manyspendidgeek
    IT Angle

    So how long till el reg hides behind a paywall?

    1. dotdavid
      Trollface

      Good question

      ...because it would be much more profitable with one, according to this article.

    2. Rikkeh

      Yes, that is a question. Given El Reg's (rightly) pointing out that not charging for content has been hugely damaging for newspapers going online, is it 1) experiencing the same* and 2) is it planning on charging for its news content?

      *Probably none of my business, right?

      1. loopy lou

        I'd pay 2 quid a month for el-reg withouth the ads, no question. Yes, yes, I know - AdBlock Plus, but it feels kind of stingy on here (unlike moronic sites like National Rail Enquiries where it is the only way to render the thing usable).

        1. P. Lee
          Unhappy

          > (unlike moronic sites like National Rail Enquiries where it is the only way to render the thing usable)

          Never tried reading el reg on a samsung galaxy then - it doesn't matter which URL you click on on the home page, you get the side-bar advert, 90% of the time.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        If The Reg does eventually plan on charging, could it at least start putting the author's name under the headline on the front page? I'd hate to waste any "free" allowance by inadvertently reading one of Orlowski's copyright-obsessed rants.

        1. eurobloke
          Thumb Up

          And his climate-change denial-ism.He seem to think that fossil fuels can live forever.

        2. This post has been deleted by its author

          1. LinkOfHyrule
            Paris Hilton

            Paying for El Reg

            I'd want a free gift, a El Reg tea mug or a wall calender with 12 of the best pics from the Playmobile reconstruction series, or something Paris-y at least!

    3. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge
      Coat

      More to the point, what's El Reg going to do for news,seeing as how it seems to get most of it's non-HiTech stories straight from the Telegraph's website?

      1. diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

        "it seems to get most of it's non-HiTech stories straight from the Telegraph's website?"

        How very dare you.

        C.

    4. bazza Silver badge
      Pint

      Printing press

      The Register, unlike the Daily Telegraph, hasn't got a loss making print operation to support. And I suspect that the staff count at The Register is considerably smaller than the Telegraph's. If that means the hacks at the Reg can still get a few beers like this one <--- on expenses then I see no risk of them putting up a paywall...

  2. El Presidente
    Windows

    BBC for the headlines

    Blogs for analysis?

    I'll only buy content from Big News when it's in dead tree format.

    The best thing about the new paywalls is that the guardian's comments section will be swamped with exiled right wing nut jobs too tight to pay a few quid a month to vent their spleen. Popcorn anyone?

    1. Brewster's Angle Grinder Silver badge

      Re: BBC for the headlines

      How will I tell the difference?

    2. An0n C0w4rd

      Re: BBC for the headlines

      It's also one step closer to the loss of (perceived) anonymity on the Internet. If papers push most of their content behind subscription systems, it becomes very easy to link a commentator to a verified credit card billing address.

      Given how the UK police and security services (as well as our lovely friends in the USA) have over-reacted numerous times to innocent comments posted on the Intertubes, I'm not convinced that this is a step in the right direction.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Meh

        Re: BBC for the headlines

        "Given how the UK police and security services (as well as our lovely friends in the USA) have over-reacted numerous times to innocent comments posted on the Intertubes, I'm not convinced that this is a step in the right direction."

        And exactly how anonymous do you think the likes of you and I are on El Reg? We've given them a valid email address, and unless it is hosted in some East European sh1thole then the mail server operators would happily grass up the IP we're accessing the email from, which in fairly short order could have you named.

        You could be accessing through multiple proxies, or from work servers (eg when I post from work it gets routed through a continental server), you could use all manner of fancy obfuscation, but I'll wager that you don't, and the incidental obfuscation of work postings and the like wouldn't save you.

        1. El Presidente
          Holmes

          Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

          "mail server operators would happily grass up the IP we're accessing the email from, which in fairly short order could have you named."

          So what? Simple solution: Never say anything online you wouldn't say to someone's face and never say anything to anyone anyway which you can not substantiate with facts. It's not rocket surgery, is it?

          1. Captain Underpants

            Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

            @El Presidente

            That's great, until you factor in the notion of whisteblowers. And whether or not you think they're needed very often, it's not necessarily a net improvement to the world to make it impossible for someone to report dodgy dealings or actions without effectively standing up and saying "I, Joe Bloggs of 123 Fake Street, would like to bring to your attention the following criminal *ack ack argh*", shortly followed by a takedown notice on the basis that the post is defamatory and a news story a couple of days later about how Joe Bloggs of 123 Fake Street has been found dead with two bullet holes in the back of his skull, and the police believe it to be suicide, and Definitely Not Shady At All.

            I do think that an awful lot of comment sections would be improved if the very small but non-zero probability existed that saying something objectionable might get you a real-world kick in the danglies. (But then, who gets to define "objectionable"? Back to square zero...)

          2. Steve the Cynic

            Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

            "It's not rocket surgery, is it?"

            No, and neither is it brain science...

            Curious conundrum: most of the stuff we call rocket science is actually engineering.

          3. Bumpy Cat

            Re: BBC for the headlines @El Presidente

            Well, that's the problem. I agree with you, but making a joke about blowing something up is enough to get you arrested these days. Heaven forbid you say something factually correct but unpleasant about a wealthy person with a libel lawyer on speed-dial.

          4. Anonymous Coward
            Meh

            Re: BBC for the headlines @El Presidente

            "So what? Simple solution"

            You seem to think I'm taking a view on on-line expression. In fact I was merely responding to the OP who commented that newspaper paywalls and associated comment forums would make the commentards more traceable, and for a very high percentage it won't make a blind bit of difference.

          5. Lars Silver badge
            Pint

            Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

            "It's not rocket surgery, is it?". Perhaps not, but your simple solution is just impossible.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THNPmhBl-8I

        2. Tom_

          Re: BBC for the headlines

          Easy solution:

          Set up the email account in an internet cafe in a town you never visit. Actually, pay a random teenager to go into the internet cafe and set the account up for you. Have them also link the email to your new Register account and respond to the confirmation email while they're in there. Have them give you the Register account username/password. Pay them in alcohol that you bought in another town that you otherwise never visit. Wear a different disguise in each town and put on a silly voice when negotiating with the teenager. Make sure you pay them enough alcohol that they won't remember any of the Register or email account details. Never ever log into the email account.

          Remember to use cash to pay for the alcohol and train tickets and don't get the cash out all at once, but just by withdrawing an extra tenner each time you use a cash machine for the preceeding few months. Launder the cash via two independent beuraux de change, converting it into a foreign curreny and back to ensure you end up with notes that don't bear your finger prints.

          Simply repeat most of the above process each time you wish to post a new comment on the Register.

      2. Turtle

        @An0n C0w4rd

        "Given how the UK police and security services (as well as our lovely friends in the USA) have over-reacted numerous times to innocent comments posted on the Intertubes,

        How many times, actually?

        1. Intractable Potsherd Silver badge

          Re: @An0n C0w4rd @ Turtle

          Too many. Once is too many, and all I need to say is "Robin Hood Airport" to show that it happened too many times already.

    3. Defiant
      Megaphone

      Re: BBC for the headlines

      Don't think you'll ever get a right-winger on the Guardian. The paper itself is £24 million in debt due to left-wingers preferring to troll right-wing media, fact.

      On another point while people are knocking this I take it you left-wingers don't mind the BBC being behind a pay wall, the BBC TV Licence

      1. This post has been deleted by its author

  3. Shagbag

    iPad app

    "The Telegraph's iPad app is consistently the most buggy and the least reliable of all the UK newspaper apps, and lies in abject, barely-supported neglect".

    More importantly, what's their Android App like? (seeing as Android has the larger market share).

    1. John Lilburne

      Re: iPad app

      Some of us block Androids from accessing our sites anyway.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: iPad app

        Well, the only person losing out there is you, John.

      2. fishman

        Re: iPad app

        <<<Some of us block Androids from accessing our sites anyway.>>>

        Cool! Sending traffic and business to your competitors - what a nice guy!

        1. Don Jefe

          Re: iPad app

          They aren't worth it. If they are using Adblock then they can merrily go somewhere else. It means nothing to me. As pointed out in the article catering to the "free" crowd is a failing venture unless you are doing some shady shit with date you collect. Why bother.

          1. vgrig_us

            Re: iPad app

            @Don Jefe

            As pointed out by pretty much anyone who had to deal with "work only with IE" b.s. and knows about user-agent - it's NOT up to you to decide who's looking at your public website.

            Hold a private viewing in your basement if you want control.

            1. Don Jefe

              Re: iPad app

              Of course it is up to me... Why would you think it wasn't?

        2. John Lilburne

          Re: iPad app

          Some of us don't give a shit about business and competitors. It ain't all about money.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: iPad app

      The article doesn't mention the iPhone app either.

      As far as I'm aware there isn't a dedicated Android Tablet App? Hence just talking about the iPad app I imagine.

      1. Kubla Cant Silver badge

        Re: iPad app

        Can somebody explain why you need a special application to read what is, at the end of the day, a collection of HTML pages?

  4. b166er
    Thumb Up

    This is great news! And from a newspaper too for a change.

    Fewer people will read their propagandist drivel.

    More of this.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Trollface

      If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

      Maybe next year eh ?

      1. Elmer Phud

        Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

        Will the Mail implode with even more self-righteous postings and be forced to go the same way?

        No doubt there will be reduced rates for subbing to the Sun via Sky , less to confuse the little dears.

        Will the Sun have special options -- one with all the news and gossip for the laydees and ine with just tits and sport for the geezers?

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

          "Will the Sun have special options ..."

          Wasn't that supposed to be an "advantage" of online content for a consumer? Your news and music feeds would be filtered to only the narrow spectrum of things you say you like. Choosing a single newspaper already sets an effective filter for style, viewpoint, and content. No doubt many regular readers then regard a large percentage of that as irrelevant to their tastes, needs, or desires.

      2. Defiant
        FAIL

        Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

        Why would they need too. The DM is the most viewed online newspaper in the world. It really upsets the loony left lol

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Stop

          Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

          "The DM is the most viewed online newspaper in the world."

          Mein Kampf sold very well in the 1930s and 1940s I believe.

          Just for balance number 3 in The World is The Guardian.

  5. Tequila Joe

    More jet Spitfires? - Oh yes please!

    I suppose I ought to sign up - I am beginning to think this country is run by the EU.

    Hacker: Don't tell me about the press. I know exactly who reads the papers: the Daily Mirror is read by people who think they run the country; The Guardian is read by people who think they ought to run the country; The Times is read by people who actually do run the country; the Daily Mail is read by the wives of the people who run the country; the Financial Times is read by people who own the country; The Morning Star is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country; and The Daily Telegraph is read by people who think it is.

    Sir Humphrey: Prime Minister, what about the people who read The Sun?

    Bernard: Sun readers don't care who runs the country, as long as she's got big tits.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_Minister

    1. kyza

      Re: More jet Spitfires? - Oh yes please!

      An updated one for the young'uns using that newfangled Utub thing

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbWiysSqKRA

      1. Shadowmanx2012
        Happy

        Re: More jet Spitfires? - Oh yes please!

        The original is still the best:

        http://youtu.be/DGscoaUWW2M

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    just remove cookies

    Unless their new paywall implementation is better than their existing one, it's pretty easy to get around. When you've reached your limit and they nag you to pay you just remove the cookies from their site and start again.

    1. Defiant
      Thumb Down

      Re: just remove cookies

      Cookies wont help if the system checks the IP

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: just remove cookies

        "Cookies wont help if the system checks the IP"

        That only works if you have an IP address dedicated to one PC. Most home users have several PCs behind their IP address. That in turn may be a NAT shared with other customers. Business intranets have a lot of PCs multiplexed behind a small set of IP addresses.

        Anyway Firefox by default erases cookies if you close the browser.

        Probably the only way they will be able to try enforce the limit will be a mandatory registration even for free content.

  7. Defiant
    FAIL

    Filth

    "Torygraph" The Register showing how neutral they are once again. Perhaps they could explain why all the left-wing media apart from the BBC (Pay us or else!) are in debt?

    1. kyza

      Re: Filth

      You are aware that 'Torygraph' has long been used by Private Eye as it's nickname, don't you?

      Goes alongside The Thunderer (The Times); The Gruaniad (The Guardian, which is (in)famous for spelling errors); The Indescribbably....(smug, boring, stupid) for the Independent.

      You'll be complaining they call the Queen 'Brenda' next.

      1. paulf Silver badge
        Facepalm

        Re: Filth

        You forgot "The Depress" which refers to the Diana fan club rag now owned by that Richard Desmond who also owns lots of grumble mags (and Channel 5).

        +1 for Ian Hislop's esteemed organ PE

      2. jm83

        Re: Filth

        Quality journalism is expensive.

        Knee jerk reactions and copy and paste from the news wires is cheap?

      3. Brian Morrison
        Headmaster

        Re: Filth

        Odd, I've always referred to the Telegraph as the Gleephart.

        And it's the Countess of Brendagh...

  8. Tom 38 Silver badge

    Tried papers on tablets

    They are universally rubbish. The Times app is OK - ish - but the Sunday Times app is atrocious, it's a series of stitched together images mainly, meaning each section is massive to download.

    The whole point of sunday papers is to completely cover every flat surface in your house with newsprint, so cramming it all into a small tablet doesn't actually work that well.

    The only time it is really useful is when you cannot get the real thing - probably abroad. In that case, the huge downloads really make it suffer. Who wants to wait 3 hours to download the Style supplement?

    Finally, the price of most newspapers is outrageous. In London, we get served with free newspapers - not the Metro, but the Evening Standard is actually decent quality. The BBC has impartial (well, BBC impartial) reporting of all main events.

    The only paper I actually regularly pay for is Private Eye, which is a magazine anyway. Private Eye, Evening Standard, BBC, The Register. Sunday Times on a sunday if I have 4 hours to kill.

    1. El Presidente
      Pint

      Re: Tried papers on tablets

      "Private Eye, Evening Standard, BBC, The Register. Sunday Times"

      Prolly covers all the news that's fit to read anyway unless you like knitting your own muesli.

      Have a pint, sir.

    2. JDX Gold badge

      Re: Tried papers on tablets

      How about on Kindle (or Kindle App)?

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Tried papers on tablets

      "The only time it is really useful is when you cannot get the real thing - probably abroad. In that case,..."

      In the 1970s many foreign countries only had "international" editions of British newspapers. Ex-pats had a variety of publications sent to them by subscription or relatives.

      The Daily Mirror arrived at the newsagents in the middle of the month as a bound tome of all the previous month's editions. Useful for a quick catch-up on "The Perishers" cartoon strip.

      A flimsy NOTW subscription arrived by airmail - memorably with the back view of Westminster Bridge streakers carefully edited to suggest they wore bras and panties. A regular UK edition showed no such censorship.

      The least dated news was in "Punch" - which inherently gave a synopsis of interesting developments. The best overall summary was the Giles cartoon annual.

      "Amateur Photographer" could be bought in the local newsagents. Quite often Customs had meticulously ripped off the front cover of the whole edition as an act of censorship.

      "Mayfair" arrived addressed to a "Mrs Whitehouse". That was allowed to sit in the office general mail tray for at least a week before belng opened - just in case Customs had intercepted it..

  9. Captain Underpants

    Given that Andrew tends to have an agenda in this area, it would probably have been a good idea to link to some actual numbers to substantiate the "circulation is up since implementing the paywall" claim, rather than showing a screenshot of the Sunday circulation figures.

    It's not hard - in ten seconds or so, I found this article discussing the NYT's circulation along with those of other papers.

    I won't say I'm necessarily delighted to see this happen, but I'm glad that a more rational model has arisen for the continued existence of newspapers. It makes sense to at least try and get some money in from readers. Though I wouldn't object if certain broadband tariffs included a fee that would be kicked back to newspaper publishers in exchange for access to their content....

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Another step closer to the end of "the scum"

    I'm all in favour of it.

    1. kyza

      Sadly that's unlikely - The Sun, Mirror and Star already all extract huge amounts of cash from their readers via MMS downloads, SMS competitions & similar 'services' - getting their readers to pay for it won't be that big an ask IMO.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Sadly you are probably correct.

  11. Dakuan
    Devil

    Shame...

    I used to rather enjoy reading the reckons left by their very special breed of commentards. Like the Daily Mail commentards with a better vocabulary. Nastier too.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Shame...

      Torygraph commentards seem to be either UKIP types trying to further deplete the limited gruntle of Tory voters, with the occasional abhorrent-to-the right trollbait being posted to stir things up.

      It's sort of at the EBCDIC-is-the-one-true character set level, occasionally rising to EBCDIC-vs-ASCII.

  12. Dan 55 Silver badge
    Headmaster

    Er, that photo

    Caption says "A canny subscription program saw both paper and digital revenues rise" but...

    1. The photo shows circulation, not revenue.

    2. Print whatever-it-is-we'll-call-it (red line), didn't rise, it carried on falling.

    Those pedantic points out the way, are the Torygraph going to prevent customers who've gone for the browser edition (e.g. more than one device) reading with a fondleslab's browser? Just sounds like they're artificially charging higher prices, if that's the digital future then maybe the freetards have a point.

    1. Intractable Potsherd Silver badge

      Re: Er, that photo - fondleslab fees

      I was going to pick up on that - why is there a bigger subscription for tablet users? I don't care - I don't have a tablet and I won't pay for a subscription to a news-service*, but it would be interesting to know why one method of reading downloaded material merits a significant price differential over another.

      *I can't remember the last time I looked at any UK newspaper's website, or print edition, for that matter. Like many others, I get Private Eye every couple of weeks, read BBC and Al Jazeera websites for general news, and El Reg for most of the rest.

  13. Tim Worstal

    Hmm

    Out here in exile the Telegraph has been "paywalled" for some months now.

    Not that it makes any damn difference. Clear cookies and you're away.

    True story: I used to write for their blogs. Used to get paid (beer money) to do so. They decided to spend their money in other ways: fair enough, it's their money. They then invited me to continue to write for free. Also fair enough.

    When I asked, being in foreign, if I could have a free £1.99 sub in return for writing for free I was told no, I couldn't. Wouldn't it be a good idea if I wrote for them for free but had to pay to read the paper instead?

    Err, no, no it wouldn't.

  14. This post has been deleted by its author

  15. Mystic Megabyte Silver badge
    Unhappy

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

    Currently hosting 14 trackers. I doubt that paying will make them go away.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Happy

      Re: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

      "Currently hosting 14 trackers. I doubt that paying will make them go away"

      But Ghostery probably will, and its free.

  16. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    well the DT paywall doesn't bother me

    it seems my news browsing computer is accidentally configured to eliminate all aspects of this 'paywall' stuff, accidentally virtually rebooting about once a week, thanks Ghostery et al!

    Even an iPad/iPhone can do: Settings/General/About/Advertising/ Reset Advertising Identifier button + Limit Ad Tracking to ON and Settings/Safari/ Clear History + Clear Cookies & Data and voila - free html news incl pink 'un (- surely a 17-yr of can write an App for that?)

    I agree with the article that if/when a news App becomes a pleasure to use and better uses the pad media than the HTML browser version or the dead-tree version then I'll happily invest. (At present my fave news source is a english language google translated html version of http://rus.postimees.ee/?online=1) best cleaned link is something like: http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Frus.postimees.ee%2F%3Fonline%3D1

    ogooglebar!

    1. TeeCee Gold badge
      Meh

      Re: well the DT paywall doesn't bother me

      I agree with the article that if/when a news App becomes a pleasure to use and better uses the pad media than the HTML browser version....

      Given the tendancy of "app" developers to regard pinch to zoom[1], as implemented in browsers, as the work of Satan and not to be trucked with, I reckon you're on a hiding to nothing there. Especially with text-heavy content, which is where the ability to resize is crucial. They may think that their chosen text size and layout is perfect and that nobody would ever want to change it, but they're almost invariably wrong.

      I've found that there are perishingly few web operations where the "app" experience is better then visiting their page[2]. I have reserved a special circle of hell for those who direct you to / automagically fire their app when a mobile browser is detected.

      I tend to find that a bookmark pinned to the screen shits from a great height on most apps for usability.

      [1] Or indeed any method of resizing the content.

      [2] Likewise, thank fuck for "Request desktop version" in the Android browser and a plague upon the houses of those sites that override it!

      1. Anonymous Custard Silver badge

        Re: well the DT paywall doesn't bother me

        Which reminds me, have the many and varied glitches in the el Reg app been looked at yet, or is the web page still the way to go?

        Given the mess it was before, somehow methinks the bookmark in Firefox is still the route to go.

        1. diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

          Re: Re: well the DT paywall doesn't bother me

          "Given the mess it was before"

          How long ago was that? The Windows 8 (shush at the back), iOS and Android apps should be all right.

          C.

          1. Anonymous Custard Silver badge

            Re: well the DT paywall doesn't bother me

            Near the beginning (the Android app) when it couldn't even manage spaces in comments, and then a few weeks after that when it was bloated, still not overly good with comments (although OK then with spaces) and had other issues with size and synching.

            Just had a quick look again - looks a bit better now, but still seems to be missing some basics like being able to search articles? Or being able to see comment vote counts or indeed vote?

            The only thing it seems to give is offline caching, and that looks to be all or nothing for both articles and for comments?

  17. adnim Silver badge

    The Sun

    couldn't pay me enough to read their "news" paper.

    Perhaps they could, £60 per hour seems fair.

    1. The lone lurker

      Re: The Sun

      You'd only make about £3 then, perhaps £4 if you didn't linger on the pictures.

      1. adnim Silver badge

        Re: The Sun

        I guess so, I haven't opened copy of the sun in 35 years, just as bad as it has always been then?

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The Sun

      couldn't pay me enough to read their "news" paper.

      Perhaps they could, £60 per hour seems fair.

      The trouble with that plan is that it only takes me a few minutes to read it.

      I am also outside the UK and thanks to my Ghostery et al I don't have problems accessing it.

    3. Tanuki
      Thumb Up

      Re: The Sun

      You seem to have failed to embrace the philosophy that "The Sun" is intended to be looked-at, not read.

  18. Craig McGill 1

    What about PressReader?

    For those looking for all-you-can-eat press - UK and elsewhere - the app/site PressReader does a cracking job at £18 a month.

    Doesn't have The Sun mind you.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: What about PressReader?

      No Sun... sounding better already

    2. El Presidente
      FAIL

      Re: What about PressReader?

      Doesn't have The Times either, does it? And the adverts! They are all there in all their glory.

  19. JimmyPage Silver badge
    Meh

    Explains recent YouGov surveys

    I had at least 3 in the past few months - I could almost sense the hysteria when I happily told them I didn't buy *any* newspaper, or subscribe to (i.e. pay for) *any* site.

  20. DrXym Silver badge

    Freeloaders?

    The Sun and Telegraph festoon their sites with ads and charge a lot of money for the impressions they deliver to the millions of visitors they enjoy every day, So while it might be "free" to visit their site (and other sites that carry advertising), it does not mean they are not making money from the act. It's a quid pro quo thing.

    Anyway, the Telegraph has disappeared up its own backside with its ridiculous UKIP pro-rhetoric of late. If it disappears behind a pay wall, then no great loss. I have no opinion of the Sun's content since I don't read it though News International haven't exactly had a lot in that direction and it's hard to see why casual visitors would be more likely to pay for the Sun than the kind who might read the Times.

    1. El Presidente
      Unhappy

      Re: Freeloaders?

      "the Telegraph has disappeared up its own backside"

      Quite a lot of long form journalism as gone the same way and a lot of output from erstwhile hacks these days is short opinion pieces presented as blog posts, neatly wrapped in click bait *Apple* surrounded by, I'm told, flashing adverts.

      Not quite the same as reading a strong image followed by three broadsheet pages full of in-depth reporting on a given subject, with a couple of astute analysis pieces by other journalists as a follow up (with a couple of pints in't pub) is it :(

  21. kyza

    Timesonline...

    NewsInt have been remarkably quiet as to the progress of their decision to paywall The Times/ST. It might be indicative of it's success that they're moving The Sun behind one, but it's just as likely that's happening because of Rupe's quotable disdain for giving his blessed opinions news content away for free.

    Being cynical, I'm more inclined to believe that it's not really been that successful else we'd have heard about it's amazing success by now.

  22. Frankee Llonnygog

    Many tech media experts and Cory Doctorow

    "Many tech media experts and Cory Doctorow"

    Very good!

    1. The Vociferous Time Waster
      Megaphone

      Re: Many tech media experts and Cory Doctorow

      I assume he's one of those people like Perez Hilton who now has a very large soapbox to opine from atop.

  23. Cliff

    Decent newspaper app

    Have to say, the FT one is one of the better ones I've seen. I think it's 10 free articles/month or some other try-but-don't-graze number, but it gives a good taste of the app and the newspaper. And it's actually a decent newspaper as well, which helps!

  24. Sebastian Brosig

    fine.

    All I read on the Torygraph site is the Matt and Alex cartoons, the actual articles are all lies anyway.

    And if Alex or Matt disappear behind a paywall, hmm I can live without it.

    If the Matt cartoon is particularly good (which happens quite frequently) they quote it on Radio4's Today Programme anyway.

    1. Kubla Cant Silver badge
      Thumb Up

      Re: fine.

      The book reviews are OK.

  25. Longrod_von_Hugendong
    FAIL

    So, you are making people pay for the news...

    or they can get it from X,y,z for free. Still i am sure the fact you only need 1 server now to handle the 3 users you have left will make the accountants happy.

    Tards, FAIL for obvious reasons.

  26. The Vociferous Time Waster

    You think el Reg is a news site?

    As the management of El Reg have stated in the past the 'news' elements of this site are only there to suck us in so they can occasionally do some market research on us and sell the results to tech companies. They also sell advertising to those companies. Hardly a good candidate for paywalling.

    1. kyza

      Re: You think el Reg is a news site?

      Way back in the mists of time when I was an online media buyer I punted a reasonable amount of business in the direction of El Reg as, commentards declaiming advertising notwithstanding, it's readers do actually click on ads and engage with the advertisers.

      Which amazed me, as I'd always assumed bog 'ware vendors would have hyperactive sales reps, thus negating the need for any ads...

  27. Mage Silver badge

    iPads and Android Tablets

    If they are so great for web browsing why are so many large business web sites try to be Appetising?

  28. Will Godfrey Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    Oh noes!

    That's two papers I don't read that I won't be able to read...

    Oh, erm...

    No problem then :)

  29. J.G.Harston Silver badge
    FAIL

    Why all this obsession with creating content-specific applications? There are already applications around to access online content, they're called browsers.

  30. Fihart

    Paywall not the way to go.

    Most papers with paywalls concede that the casual browser can scope the main stories for free. This suits the short-attention-span mindset that most internet users adopt. If they try to stop that, the majority will simply drop them and go to the many free sites remaining (and others will doubtless spring up in response).

    In London there are now three free (physical) newspapers daily and one weekly magazine -- plus the Indie which sells for just 20p. This would seem to be the future.

  31. Winkypop Silver badge
    FAIL

    Dear Papers

    So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (wrapping)

  32. Rob Daglish
    Meh

    @Kubla Cant

    No need for them to be apps, except it's rather nice that I can grab a copy of the times onto my xperia and read it on the train without needing a mobile phone signal, which is non-existant on the Cumbrian Coast line for large sections, and we don't have any on-train wifi

  33. Xpositor

    Private Eye References

    For all those confused by Private Eye references, their glossary in each issue can be found on page 94.

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