back to article Nokia flings out WinPho 7 phones

Nokia has posted snaps showing what it its first Windows Phone 7 smartphones to may look like. Well, sort of. "These are not actual products, just artist renderings of what the Nokia-Microsoft collaboration could produce," confessed the Finnish phone giant. Nokia WinPho 7 They look rather swish, so we hope these …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
  1. Scott Thomson
    Thumb Down

    They look very nice..

    shame they don't run Android.. or Meego.. or even at a push, symbian..

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Grenade

      /facepalm

      What a stupendously unoriginal, predictable piece of pointless commentardary.

      Besides, as someone who has suffered the embarrassment of an "S60" Nokia offering for the past 9 months, putting up with its dog-slow interface and inconsistent UI control "features", I say "Bring on Windows!", something I thought I'd never write, frankly...

      1. Notorious Biggles

        /facepalms AC

        The current range of Symbian^3 handsets don't have a dog-slow interface at all. They've got the fastest mobile GPU in them after all. You might only have been using that phone for 9 months, but the hardware is almost certainly older than that. And if I were to use a year old Android handset, I could probably complain about it too.

        At least Symbian is a smartphone OS, unlike the shiny-but-dumb WP7.

        1. chr0m4t1c

          @Notorious Biggles

          As an N8 user for some months now, I would agree that the interface is no longer "dog slow", but they really aren't making very good use of their fastest mobile GPU.

          The interface really doesn't compare very well with the likes of Android or iOS devices 12-18 months older and it's mainly down to any lack of work on the underlying applications.

          For example:

          If you take a picture with your phone's camera and then want to show it to someone you're with you have to wait anything up to a minute for the photo app to generate thumbnails (or at least create placeholder icons) of all of your pictures before you're allowed to view the picture you've just taken. If you then zoom in on the picture, it just shows a blocky version of the "fitted to screen" image you were looking at instead of zooming in properly.

          Symbian might be a great smartphone OS, but if you put a sucky UI on top of it the experience is still sucks and like it or not consumer perception is based on the UI not the underlying OS, which makes Symbian at best fourth behind (in alphabetic order) Android, iOS and WP7.

  2. dogged

    Harsh..

    I think the N8 is very pretty indeed and - to its credit - looks nothing like anything from anyone else.

    Shame about Symbian, though.

  3. Tim Walker
    Unhappy

    Flamebait?

    "Though if it designers can come up with a look like this, why are so many of the company's current handsets so darn unattractive?"

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder - I rather like the appearance of my N8, though frankly, with everything that handset is capable of, it could look like a potato and I wouldn't care much (note: figure of speech ;-)).

    More importantly: my wife loves her C7, and believe me, she wouldn't have given it houseroom if she wasn't keen on its looks. (It sounds as if she's not alone - a sales guy at our local Carphone Warehouse says the C7 is very popular with the ladies...)

    1. David Beck

      Couldn't agree more

      Glad to see there is at least one other person in the world who is more interested in how well it works and what it can do than how shiny it is when buying a phone. If you remove all logos from the top 10 touchscreens, how many people could identify the "winners".

  4. Santonia
    FAIL

    Old news.

    First seen on Engadget.com just 2 weeks ago.

  5. Robert E A Harvey
    Stop

    easy

    cut-and-paste a windows7 screendump onto a few solid models and rotate. Hardly rocket science.

    headline grabbing nonsense.

This topic is closed for new posts.

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019