back to article Brexit: UK will be disconnected from EU databases after 2020

The UK will be locked out of European Union databases once the Brexit transition period ends – but the UK is hoping a data adequacy decision will be adopted by the end of 2020. The Withdrawal Agreement (PDF), published late last night and testing printers across the nation this morning, runs to almost 600 pages and has led to …

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  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Tory Unity

    That referendum vote at least delivered on its primary aim of uniting the Tory party.

    All these little technical details of Brexit are just distractions from that goal.

    Guffaw!

    1. Aladdin Sane Silver badge

      Re: Tory Unity

      Unified through knifing each other in the back.

      Does anybody else think that snivelling little shit Gove is a dead-ringer for Gollum?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Tory Unity

        You are right on the nail there (and sadly Gove is my MP)

        What this whole thing will to is make certain that Corbyn is the PM after the next election. The Tory party is a dead duck. It will splinter into the hard right and the soft right factions.

        The words of an old song come to mind when thinking about Corbyn as PM

        "Another day older and deeper in debt"

        We have no idea how he will finance his programme of nationalising everything in sight apart from the ususal 'tax the rich' as in anyone earning more than the Living Wage.

        I really fear for the young people of this country as to what lies ahead. not all of us old farts voted to leave.

        If I could leave the county I would but I have to care for my 97 year old Mother.

        We are doomed as a country.

    2. Rich 11 Silver badge

      Re: Tory Unity

      All hail the party! Forward together!

      1. Aladdin Sane Silver badge

        Re: Tory Unity

        Strength through unity! Unity through faith!

    3. Gamrith

      Re: Tory Unity

      It worked as well as most things do that the Tories put what passes for their minds to. It underscores the old truism:

      "One should never listen to the Tories, unless one enjoys buggery!"

  2. Mage Silver badge

    Titanic

    Not a slow motion train crash.

    Egotism, avoidable, takes ages to sink and not enough lifeboats, none for the poor.

    1. Christoph Silver badge

      Re: Titanic

      And the captain ordering "Full Steam Ahead towards the iceberg!"

  3. devTrail

    Too much

    Already too much for a country known for spying on their allies, including Merkel phone.

    But actually I'm afraid that while the deadline approaches we'll see the emergence of a new stream of terror attacks to make the case for further collaboration on "security".

    1. Will Godfrey Silver badge
      Unhappy

      Re: Too much

      I have sometimes thought these terror attacks occur at very 'interesting' times.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Too much

        All news is propaganda. All crises are engineered.

        Except the ones that really matter.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    We Need a REALLY bad deal

    So that governments for the next century can continue to blame everything on the EU.

  5. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

    On a simplified note, it looks to me like the better of a bunch of bad options. As a member of the EU, we can't even begin to start proper trade talks with anyone. But after Brexit, as a "non-member" in a transition agreement, we can hold those trade talks. So by the time the transition period is over, we might actually have the beginnings of some trade deals in place and ready to go.

    I also note the the most vocal politicians such as Reese-Mogge and Boris are more than rich enough to weather any economic downturn the hard Brexit they want will most likely cause. No possible deal, hard or soft was ever going to please everyone, not even close to majority. Especially considering that 48% or people voted not to leave in the first place, and the people who voted leave had a number of different reasons for leaving and visions of what leave meant.

    I think what saddens me most about this whole sorry affair is the polarisation happening here that we see has already destroyed US politics. There's a lot of personal animosity between the various sides and very little actual discussion, or even listening to others points of view. Whatever else might happen, we are leaving the EU. Politicians of all sides should be looking at what is best for the country as a whole, not furthering the own agenda and appearing splintered and disorganised on the world stage. Argue in private, but at least try to put on some sort of united front in public. The squabbling not only gives the EU a stronger bargaining position, but also any potential trade partners we might want to deal with. A fully united UK is going to have a tough enough time getting a good deal with the US, especially with Trump in charge (his idea of good and fair is that he wins and the other guy loses big time), but a splintered UK Gov, will have no chance with him.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I thunk you had better read the fine print. No trade deals with rest of world.

    2. codejunky Silver badge

      @ John Brown (no body)

      "As a member of the EU, we can't even begin to start proper trade talks with anyone"

      Actually yes we can, we just cant sign them until the minute we leave.

      "No possible deal, hard or soft was ever going to please everyone, not even close to majority"

      Just as remain would have upset the majority (leave voters) as well as those various flavours of remain voter who want reform, just feared the govs punishment budget, fear of the EU, etc.

      "Especially considering that 48% or people voted not to leave in the first place"

      The minority. If this was an election that would be those who didnt win. The smaller group who do not get to impose their minority view on the people. The minority might not like that everyone else does not conform to their 'I am always right' view but tough. We had a democratic vote which has a result and thats it. But democracy relies on honourable people willing to pass power to the victor of the vote. It is a requirement.

      "very little actual discussion, or even listening to others points of view."

      That is 100% spot on. See above.

      1. strum Silver badge

        Re: @ John Brown (no body)

        > But democracy relies on honourable people willing to pass power to the victor of the vote.

        It also depends on the ability to change one's mind, before too damage is done.

        1. codejunky Silver badge

          Re: @ John Brown (no body)

          @ strum

          "It also depends on the ability to change one's mind, before too damage is done."

          Actually no you are wrong. Who dictates what is damage and who dictates too much and who dictates their limited view as the right one? In a democracy such dictation is not the way which is why we have democratic votes. Unfortunately damage has been done with over 20 years without a say in being sold to the EU. Now we have changed our mind. After 3 votes to get it!

      2. MJI Silver badge

        Re: @ John Brown (no body)

        I suppose we will just have a referendum every 5 years and probably rejoin in future.

        Whole point is elections are regular so people can change their mind, this referendum is a one off.

        Totallydiffrent

        1. codejunky Silver badge

          Re: @ John Brown (no body)

          @ MJI

          "I suppose we will just have a referendum every 5 years and probably rejoin in future."

          Why? We have elections. If we elect politicians to rejoin then we will likely end up rejoining (probably without opt outs and with various ideas of what joining will mean).

          "Whole point is elections are regular so people can change their mind, this referendum is a one off."

          3 votes to get this result. 3. Not some piddly one referendum and that is after electing politicians promising such a choice for a number of elections before the last 2.

    3. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

      I think what saddens me most about this whole sorry affair is the polarisation happening here that we see has already destroyed US politics.

      I have to agree with you, but it's not just in the UK. It's happening all across the EU. For the Brussels politicians there is only one valid viewpoint: "EU über alles". They seem blind to the way that is polarizing people, who have no moderate eurosceptic option. The result is that they go to the extremes, right and left, as the only way to say "slow down a minute, we don't like where the EU is going". That is incredibly dangerous for the future of Europe as a whole.

    4. Lars Silver badge
      Happy

      "As a member of the EU, we can't even begin to start proper trade talks with anyone.".

      Nor can France and Germany and the rest. Wonder how they manage it, and making Trump so upset.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Co-incy-dink

    BREXIT day aligns with my retirement date.

    What a day I will have.

    Popcorn AND Beer!

    1. John G Imrie Silver badge
      Pint

      Re: Co-incy-dink

      That will be proper British bear then, none of that continental larger crap.

      1. Aladdin Sane Silver badge

        Re: Co-incy-dink

        Is English not your first language?

      2. Winkypop Silver badge

        Re: Co-incy-dink

        "Proper English bear"

        Who?

        Paddington?

        1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

          Re: Co-incy-dink

          Paddington?

          Isn't he from Peru?

  7. Mike 137

    Waiting for adequacy

    What nobody here (or apparently anyone in government circles) has noted yet is that loss of access to these national databases is only a part of the data processing debacle.

    The EU position that an adequacy may be made during the transition period automatically implies that for quite some time between March 30th and the making of a decision British businesses will face serious complications, or indeed may be barred from, transferring personal data out of Europe and quite possibly also from processing any such data received if the processing involves onward transfers to other third countries.

    In the worst case, the European party to such transfers will be at liberty to terminate the arrangement, and at best UK businesses will have to enter unfamiliar negotiations with the European side and undertake to fulfil novel responsibilities that nobody has yet explained authoritatively to them - and this with a mere four months to go before Brexit.

    I've been pressing the authorities for quite some time to provide explicit reliable guidance before it's too late on what UK businesses have to do to ensure continued lawful transfers of personal data from the EU. But it could already be too late for many, particularly in the SMB sector where my professional experience shows that the entirety of data protection is still much of a mystery. So the inertia of the government in this could quite easily put small businesses out of business or force them to operate unlawfully in order to stay in business.

    1. devTrail

      Re: Waiting for adequacy

      "The EU position that an adequacy may be made during the transition period automatically implies that for quite some time between March 30th and the making of a decision British businesses will face serious complications, or indeed may be barred from, transferring personal data out of Europe and quite possibly also from processing any such data received if the processing involves onward transfers to other third countries."

      Most of the times I apply for a role in a big company anywhere in Europe after few days I am contacted by a British recruitment agency looking for contractors, a lot of time the agent happens to be Indian and sometimes they are even based in India (the agency having just the HQ in the UK). It's clear that my CV has been handed over without my consent to a third party, I often ask how they got it, they never reply, only once a recruiter admitted that he was outsourcing the pre-screening process and he retained my private details for his own business, when I complained he even protested that he had the right to do so. However I suspect that most of the times they don't get the CV while doing the screening, they just bribe HR employees. In this way without my consent my CV and my private details ended up in a lot of databases and often they ended up in countries like India that do not protect at all people privacy. It's not just privacy, once I clearly found evidence that an agency I never contacted was interfering with an application I made for a job and I suspect it happened a lot of times, but HR employees are tight lipped on these issues.

      Therefore in my experience the sooner what you wrote happens the better it is.

  8. Jagged

    My only concern is that they delete our data when we leave.

  9. StuntMisanthrope Bronze badge

    Don’t tell ‘em your name Pike.

    As we’ve discovered GDPR has outlawed bulk (meta)data captured via port mirroring and upstream packet interrogation without warrant. It probably cost a fortune as well. We can also take Euro’s via the magic lamp, in fact there’s a probably a fortune stuck down the sofa. Also UK will remain co-joined by infrastructure though with infrastructure peering partner. A least data footprint has also never been a bad thing as proved several times. I discovered all this by the way watching Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, highly recommended and five stars. #platoonthedoorsocratesonthewheels

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