back to article GDPR forgive us, it's been one month since you were enforced…

A month after the enforcement date of the General Data Protection Regulation – a law that businesses had two years to prepare for – many websites are still locking out users in the European Union as a method of compliance. To celebrate the milestone, El Reg is casting a vulture's eye over the sites that are giving a new …

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Re: Dicks sporting goods misbehaving?

Oi! Must have been rough in school for W. Kerr. Or American race car driver Richard Trickle.

Worst one I've seen from an IT end is a Korean gentleman I worked with who transliterated his surname simply as a capital O. Broke an awful lot of software and wetware "Mister you need to fill out your full name. If you just put in an initial..." Ended up changing to Oh

In my other life I work with kids. Recently had one upset I struggled with her first name. Spelled: L-u. Confused? Its pronounced "Lee Dash Uh". How the hell what I supposed to figure that out?

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J27

I think it's cute that the author of this piece actually believes that American media corporations are going to try to support GDPR. If totally blocking all EU IPs works of them and is even slightly easier, they're not going to bother allowing all their visitors to opt out of tracking cookies. That would risk all their income for the possibility of serving people they don't care about serving.

It's beside the point that blocking EU IPs doesn't actually prevent EU residents from accessing your website using proxies or say, just by being in a non-EU country when they access your site. Heck, it's written so that it may well apply to non-resident citizens of the EU too, which even includes me.

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Even if the EU thinks it should apply to EU citizens living in the US, good luck getting any enforcement of such a ruling by an EU court against a US company that has taken pains to block EU visitors rather than try to comply. How is a US website supposed to know that you are covered under the GDPR if you are accessing it from the US? That would be like a Muslim expecting Google to block images of Mohammad from searches by somehow magically knowing his religion (well, maybe that's a bad example, Google probably does know his religion...)

Speaking of Google, what are they doing to comply with the GDPR? They are probably the biggest potential violator there is.

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Anonymous Coward

our customer had a huge GDPR message completely obscuring their home page, injected by javascript by a third party supplier of theirs, without their consent.

it's delicious watching all the organisations flail around tearing away at each other.

serves 'em right.

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Anonymous Coward

'Whole host of local media outlets that are shying away from dealing with the matter'

Well so far most firms are earning a flat out fail! Starting with telco Three and my bank. Both failed to even reply. The local electricity / gas firms require you to submit a copy of government issued ID with your email or they will do nothing. Nice ID-Theft vector there!

A quick email to the local DPC (Helen Dixon) to ask if this is ID requirement is legal confirms more bad news. The Irish DPC has added their own bloc or fresh new barrier to processing queries... A PDF form to fill out before anything gets looked at and yet another barrier to slow down and bury GDPR....

Vodafone unbelievably has a data-deletion request button on their site. But it will it work? 30 days and we'll see.

Overall though, really tired of firms uploading their CRM databases to Facebook / Instagram to feed the Shadow Profile monster. But if they don't ever reply, how the hell can you stop this.

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NY Daily News, FWIW

I use uBlock Origin and ScriptBlock, in Chrome. My laptop has two mouse buttons and a touchpad, so I installed a middle-click simulator. Pressing both buttons simultaneously simulates the middle button on a mouse.

The New York Daily News was recently bought by the same outfit that owns the Chicago Tribune and the LA Times. After the acquisition, whenever I middle-clicked on a link from the Daily News home page to an article, the middle-click simulator stopped working, on any site. The only solution was to reboot the laptop. This problem has never appeared anywhere else. I stopped reading the Daily News, and the quality of my life has not been diminished.

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What works and what doesn't

From Iceland (country, EEA, GDPR law apply) this works.

* Los Angeles Times

* New York Daily News

What doesn't.

* Chicago Tribune

I guess some people in the U.S don't know how complicated Europe really is. I don't blame them.

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Anonymous Coward

Another cheap tactic used is to literally force you to resubmit your choices every single time on site / page load / refresh. Many websites require you to untick each individual ad tracker/provider manually, only to request you to do it all over again once the page is refreshed. It is sinister and quite possibly illegal. But as long as we persevere and / or avoid using websites that do no respect our right to privacy, these companies will eventually "get it" and comply. GDPR, if anything, has at least opened my eyes as to the scale of the issue of privacy and just how many different companies with shady credentials get access to our (meta-)data.

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Anonymous Coward

Also, if you accidentally or intentionally opt-in, its actually harder to opt out afterwards as relevant options disappear. So, if you opt out you are constantly harassed to opt back in - but if you opt in it becomes difficult to opt out. Shady tricks by companies that have truly revealed their shady side to consumers ever since the GDPR.

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Firefox reading view

I've found that when I can get around some blocks or incredibly annoying multi-click consent prompts by using the Firefox Reading mode. Using Google mobilizer on my Android rss reader works as well.

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Re: Firefox reading view

Blocks can also be removed using the Tor network.

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Go

C0 Alarms Anyone

I guess those 'wonderful' C0 alarms recently withdrawn on Amazon and e-bay for giving you a good nights sleep followed by an everlasting deep sleep as you failed to wake up in the presence of C0 would be a prime candidate for such action. They did not explode, they just did nothing.

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Photo ID for GDPR queries?

I'm on a data-trail at the moment.

I was sent a marketing email about Company A's product. Upon querying the point of consent:-

Company A blamed Company B

Company B blamed Company C

Company C blamed Companies E, F, G, H & I for providing data under warranty.

Company C claims that their owners, Company D (with whom I have a relationship and hold a "no marketing record) do not share data whereas Company D explicitly state on their data protection statement that they do.

Company E claim to neither hold nor have supplied data to Company C

Company F refuse to engage with me until I post them clear copies of my passport, drivers licence and a bank statement!

Company G, H, I & J have stll to respond.

It's all a bally mess, there's no way any reasonable person is going to send copies of photo ID and financial records to an organisation they are suspicious of poor data handling and there is absolutely no responsibility or ownership.

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Re: Photo ID for GDPR queries?

Report 'em all and let GDPR sort 'em out!

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Oh, why do you DEFY us so?

This site works with a US IP, but in the UK...:

http://www.smosh.com/articles/best-botched-ecce-homo-painting-meme :

Due to certain regulatory changes, we are unable to connect you with the requested DEFY Media website.

We invite you to visit DEFY’s programming channels, including those listed below:

SMOSH YouTube Channel

CLEVVER YouTube Channel

AWEME YouTube Channel

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