back to article Ten Linux apps you must install

Unless you are operating in the enterprise class, most Linux software is free, which is both a blessing and a hindrance. Sure, there are some truly fantastic apps out there, but all to often you have to wade through a mess of buggy unfinished projects with dependencies on other defunct code to get to what you want. To help with …

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Artha

Artha is a nifty thesaurus and dictionary. Highlight any word press Ctrl-Alt-W to get a definition.

Also great for crossword solving R???S??R returns the following results

ravisher

register

resister

resistor

roadster

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Go

Re: Artha

Oh, you mean like

$ egrep r...s..r /usr/share/dict/american-english

(Actually, I made a script called cw. I didn't get `ravisher', but did come up with `robuster'.)

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Anonymous Coward

Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

Windows 8, and join the 21st century. Innovation beyond compare, it's what Linux will be doing in 5 years after all the ideas have been copied.

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FAIL

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

0/10

jimmies remain unrustled.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

"Windows 8, and join the 21st century. Innovation beyond compare, it's what Linux will be doing in 5 years after all the ideas have been copied."

Thank you for completing the "Master of Technology" exam - unfortunately you have failed

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FAIL

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

As technical advice..fail.

As humour..fail.

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Holmes

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

"Windows 8, and join the 21st century. Innovation beyond compare, it's what Linux will be doing in 5 years after all the ideas have been copied."

And you my friend have "innovate" and "change" confused

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Devil

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

You have failed to notice who is copying whom. The Metro interface is a direct copy of the appearance of Unity on Ubuntu, which came out long before Win 8 and Metro.

And Jakob Nielsen is right, a plague on both those interfaces because they are perversions.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

The tiles come from Windows mobile which pre-dates Unity by some way.

Also, the Win8 tiles are functional; unlike Unity which seems to be nothing more than an Amazon tat bazaar. Even when Linux copies it manages to mess up it seems.

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Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

Have you ever, ever, actually used Unity - I presume not because your comment makes no sense if you actually had used it. I suspect you read some headlines, formed an opinion and are now spouting that opinion off without actually, you know, trying it out?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

Have you ever, ever, actually stabbed yourself in the eyes with a fork - I presume not but how do you know it hurts without actually, you know, trying it out?

Some things one simply knows from past experience, but as it happens I have tried Unity and it was just as painful as I would imagine stabbing myself in the eyes with a fork to be. It's probably the reason Linux uses the command-line so much, it just struggles graphically.

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Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

"uses the command-line so much, it just struggles graphically."

FUD

Just been editing 1080p/50 video on a rather elderly 2-core AMD - works fine - no struggles

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Trollface

Re: Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

"Most important thing any Linux user needs to install:

Windows 8, and join the 21st century. Innovation beyond compare, it's what Linux will be doing in 5 years after all the ideas have been copied."

Jerk alert! - Mouth (the Goonies)

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Re: Innovation beyond compare

Really???

You know that "innovative" UI that WindblowZE 8 just "introduced"??

It was premiered in Ubuntu 10.10 which came out in October of 2010!!!!!

Micro$oft is a bit late to the party!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Innovation beyond compare

"It was premiered in Ubuntu 10.10 which came out in October of 2010!!!!!"

Very wrong. But nice try to re-write history, the tiles were brought over from Windows mobile which pre-dates Ubuntu Maverick by some way.

You clearly have no valid argument as you've had to resort to playground name calling. It's not unexpected though, such infantile behaviour is common within the F/OSS community; which is why professional organisations prefer to work with actual professionals and not yourselves.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Innovation beyond compare

Windows Phone 7 != Windows 8 Metro UI

They both use tiles but apart from that don't share a lot in common. Windows 8's Metro UI is much more similar to Unity in it's implementation.

"It's not unexpected though, such infantile behaviour is common within the F/OSS community; which is why professional organisations prefer to work with actual professionals and not yourselves."

That'd be why over 60% of enterprise servers and 92% of supercomputers run Linux then?

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Anonymous Coward

Click...click...click...click...click

Only two items per page? Sigh.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Click...click...click...click...click

I think that's all open office can cope with

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Re: Click...click...click...click...click

Try the 'Print' button near the top left to get a single page version. HTH

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Linux

Kate eh?

Didn't know about it till this article - I guess its because I never use KDE.

I used geany for a year or two, but ultimately I have retured to VI, or VIM X11 as of yesterday...

Think I'll give kate a try out and she how good she is.

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Trollface

Re: Kate eh?

"Think I'll give kate a try out and she how good she is."

Cue dirty joke in 3...2...

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Pint

Free but rich

These types of articles are helpful to convery just how rich the options available to Free Software users really are, and the comments also reflect the joys of their being options. My own list also doesn't include any of the above, but does inlcude:-

Zim - desktop wiki-style note editor - I have three "notebooks" which have years of stuff in them. Also usable as a daily journal with eth calendar plugin

Radiotray - uses the gstreamer plugin system to play radio streams - all the Beeb output, including 3Extra for us non-DAB denizens, and other streams around the world. Very convenient and unobtrusive.

gthumb - for photo management ans imple manipulation. Not as fully fledged as digikam, the absolute must-have for serious photographers, but adequate and reasonably quick.

Thunderbird with Lightning. Lightning works against a centralised calendar provided by eGroupware or Owncloud, two server-based must-have offerings.

But coming back to the article, it's refreshing to see how others have different needs or wants to your own and the fact that Free Software doesn't place anythign other than personal demands against use.

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Joke

Re: Free but rich

> Thunderbird with Lightning

Very, very frightening?

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Devil

Beelzebub

Has a devil put aside for meeee!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Free but rich

> Very, very frightening?

Geo-location by new European satteliite system,

Geo-location by new European satteliite system

Middle-eastern fruit good for the bowels plus the projectile from a bow

MAGNIFiCOOOOOOOO!

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Re: Free but rich

Thanks for mentioning Zim - it seems great, almost exactly what I was looking for - I particularly like the way it stores the data, the plain text files are very "clean" and easy to update with VI over SSH when I'm out and about.

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Re: Free but rich

> Thanks for mentioning Zim

You;re most welcome. OpenSuSE users can use the source on the zim site, but apt-based systems should find it in the repos.

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Linux

KATE

Whilst Kate is good, Gedit is my favourite.

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Linux

Re: KATE

I recommend Geany, lots of features in a neat interface.

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Linux

Hardly everyday stuff

Yes I absolutely love GParted but it's hardly something to fire up everyday unless you like messing with your pi regularly

What about WINE (for games, spotify, etc)

maybe konqueror instead of dolphin for example and perhaps a list of good alternative web browsers (some of the default ones are terrible)

in openSuse and kubuntu anyway Alt+F2 has all my applications and docs so no idea why I would install anything over that

BOINC for a bit of distributed computing so you can leave it in lock screen mode instead of shutting down guilt-free for a few minutes while you go for dinner

The kind of things that when you have a fresh install you should immediately trawl through to find a good list of killer applications to make it a pleasure to use in your own preferred style

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Anonymous Coward

Those of us stuck on Windows can get Kate as part of KDE4 Win.

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Linux

Or Notepad++ without the need for KDE4

http://notepad-plus-plus.org/

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Linux

I'd have thought top of the list was a tool to locate your nearest sandal shop.

But seriously, these top tens are rubbish. Nothing is a MUST. I've rarely come across one of these lists (Linux, Windows, iOS, Android, Firefox plugins, etc, etc) that actually contain a tool I haven't already found an answer for.

(For El Reg - this is intended to be constructive - I've given up reading the Top Tens as of today - lets see what other readers think)

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Anonymous Coward

@Velv

"But seriously, these top tens are rubbish. Nothing is a MUST."

When I saw the article title, I presumed they wanted to see flame wars between Linux users. Wasn't surprising to see who first brought a vi-alike into it :)

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Coat

"I'd have thought top of the list was a tool to locate your nearest sandal shop" -- That actually might be useful, so that I can find a home for these Molotov cocktails!! </Joke>

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Top ten articles do have their uses...

Though I invariably either already use or have dismissed the software mentioned in these articles, I have been alerted to quite a few gems through the comments. Same thing for this article - Zim looks almost exactly what I was after a year or two ago but I don't recall having seen it (desktop wiki isn't really the kind of description that I would have associated with my requirement.)

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Happy

You missed one

The first thing I install on a fresh build is MC.

When it's too much bother to fish around in a GUI I find that MC will always sort things out for me. Oh, and as a extra it includes a little thing named "mcedit", perfect for just diving in and editing a config file or two.

As an oldie I do still miss "linuxconf", that was great for setting up bits and pieces after a new install.

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Re: You missed one

Ditto here - but then that's probably due to using Norton Commander on DOS oh so many years ago, and being happy with the way it works.

Might give PeaZip a go though - if only to compare it to the 7zip equivalent I tend to use on Windows boxes

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Happy

Unfortunately most of these comments only illustrate that many don't feel adequate unless they demonstrate themselves superior to another human being.

The list isn't bad, although it's likely many will have already come bundled with the distro we've downloaded and used, or have equivalents depending on the DE of choice. Good point about antivirus, even though we don't need it. Everyone who's been using Linux for a little while will have developed their own preferences for doing different things, but lists like this are useful for making one review the tools they use and maybe trying some new ones.

Nice that many of these are graphical front ends to command line tools too. I'd never want the command line to be lost, but equally I'd not want to use it in normal day to day operation; your preference may be different and that's fine too. I suspect many who use Linux these days do so because they wanted freedom from feeling like they were being told just how things were going to be, rather than for technical reasons or wishing to escape the evil GUI.

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Trollface

"Unfortunately most of these comments only illustrate that many don't feel adequate unless they demonstrate themselves superior to another human being."

I don't grok what you're talking about

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making choices

I suspect many who use Linux these days do so because they wanted freedom from feeling like they were being told just how things were going to be, rather than for technical reasons or wishing to escape the evil GUI.

Thanks Mister T. You nailed it. It's funny how some people get into technical details when that isn't even relevant. One would think that in this day and age where IP is king, that people reading these forums were more cognisant of the role of licence agreements in making choices.

As for the list. I agree, it's not bad. This article sparked discussion and I've picked up a couple of good pointers in the comments.

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Kate? Kate? You're joking

..Kate is is too close to vi, and only works well in the KDE environment.

Geany and Gedit are fine but don't go nearly far enough.

There can be only one, and it's Bluefish <a href="http://bluefish.openoffice.nl/index.html" target=_blank>here</a>

- mutliple windows for many files open at once

- syntax highlighting for many more languages

- code block folding (to make IFs or subroutines appear and disappear)

- tooltips for language reference

and lots lots more

Bluefish is also available on That Other Operating System.

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..and for those who can't escape Other OS users..

..I put Crossover on wife mint laptop, as she absolutely positively must use Office 2003...as a side effect she canplay Civ too

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Anonymous Coward

Re: ..and for those who can't escape Other OS users..

FreeCiv is always an option there ;)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: ..and for those who can't escape Other OS users..

Have you tried PlayOnLinux? It doesn't cost anything unlike CrossOver. It's name is a bit misleading since it originally started out as an easy way to get Windows games running on Linux but it can run anything. It's a superb front-end for Wine though, setting up Wine prefixes and even multiple versions of Wine on the same machine with ease.

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Happy

Re: ..and for those who can't escape Other OS users..

I second that motion, also PlayOnMac works well too.

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mutt for me

not because of geekness, but because it is nice to have all my email set up in one place and I can easily access archives without needing to do syncing shenanigans!

I still use the email client on my phone for notification and quick access

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Sad

That so many of the comments here are by command line users who seem to look down on graphical desktops. As a command line user from BBC micro and DOS days, I bloody love graphical UI's. Once they appeared I was as happy as a pig in shit. Much easier to understand and explain to people. It the 'command line or nothing' attitude that puts many people off Linux, and the people commenting above are the reason. 'My way or the highway' is NOT a good advert.

I use Linux every day and Windows XP/7everyday, I use Unity, but also use the command line when I need to. Graphical desktops are great for the vast majority of users, but the command line is great when you need to drop down to it. It's not an 'either or' situation, and I wish the extremists could get that through their heads.

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At last!

Hear hear! The voice of reason at last. GUIs and command-line/terminal use can coexist. Even on Windows.

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Linux

Re: Sad

You got my vote.

Because my old fedora 6 file server box runs cheerfully along without its GUI nonsense and about the only command it ever gets is to restart samba.

But to set it up in the first place, its login as root, startx and use those nice GUIs created by the fedora/redhat team.

But the command line is quicker the wailing starts..

yeah if you can remember all the bloody commands and options.. and lets face it... how many of us really do that?

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