back to article She cannae take it, Captain Kirk! USS Zumwalt breaks down

Weird new warship USS Zumwalt has broken down while on sea trials, three weeks ahead of her formal commissioning ceremony. The futuristic $4.4bn vessel, which features a so-called “tumblehome” hull, suffered a seawater leak into the auxiliary lube oil system for one of her main propeller shafts, according to USNI News. The …

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Which explains the later US policy f using nukes against Japanese fishing boats - can't take any chances

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Pity that there isn't an Enterprise in commission...

Although there will be a new one commissioned in 2025. By which time the then Admiral James Kirk may need to be sent out to sea again. To find a whale or something.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Pity that there isn't an Enterprise in commission...

Hope it will never meet a Chinese ship commanded by some descendant of Kublai Khan...

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Re: Pity that there isn't an Enterprise in commission...

Hope it will never meet a Chinese ship commanded by some descendant of Kublai Khan...

Just look out for the name "Xanadu" on the bows...

Hint: it may look like a "stately pleasure dome".

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Re: Pity that there isn't an Enterprise in commission...

Captain Kirk is surface navy. To command a carrier you need to have been a flyer. So he will never command the Enterprise although he may command one of her escorts.

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Re: Pity that there isn't an Enterprise in commission...

Well there is one in commission, it's just called HMS ENTERPRISE so this Capt Kirk USN is unlikely to get to play with her.

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Anonymous Coward

Captain Pugwash

There's never a tsunami around when you need one....ah well, hopefully it'll sail over a pocket of methane gas and fuckin sink!

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Sub heading surprise

"Water got into where water should not have been"

It's a ship, ie a vessel intended to be in a very "water-rich" environment, I would design it on the understanding that water might get ANYWHERE and - knowing that - have something in hand for when it did.

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LDS
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Re: Sub heading surprise

Just, lubricants and water usually don't play well together...

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Re: Sub heading surprise

A lot of US ships and boats use Cutless bearings which are sea water lubricated and cooled - as well as being simple in construction they have the advantage that they don't leave an oil slick.

You would think by now after over 150 years of development stern tubes and shaft bearings would be idiot proof, but I guess that with that amount of money the DoD can afford a better class of idiot.

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Re: Sub heading surprise

Seawater lubricated bearings notwithstanding... [they work nicely for shaft seals and bearings located outside the main hull]

it probably wasn't caused by an oil-lubricated shaft bearing that was directly exposed to water. Most likely it was a lube oil cooling system that leaked water into the oil. These ships typically use sea water for cooling things like oil and sometimes directly cooling rotating machinery. Oil gets hot when it's used to lubricate things like turbine reduction gears, so you need an oil cooler. If the oil cooler has a defect causing a leak, it probably requires a shipyard to replace it. In the mean time, watery oil makes a poor lubricant, so they'd lock the shaft and run on the other one(s).

that's my take on it.

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weapons?

For a warship, doesn't appear to have many weapons. They could of course be hidden by the RADAR obfuscation tech....

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Re: weapons?

they get the crew to stand on deck with there pea shooters ...

weapons would have cost extra .. :)

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Facepalm

Re: weapons?

The designers obviously watched those episodes of Thunderbirds/Capt'n Scarlett/Space 1999 where weapons 'magically' appeared out of the Hull/wings etc and were remotely controlled.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: weapons?

A lot of ships seem to be going the way of vertical launch missile silos rather than having a moving deck-mounted launcher fed from a magazine below.

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Re: weapons?

I was hoping for a line of hatches opening along the side and cannon being run out.

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Re: weapons?

flearider, been there, done that. Compare Spruance-class destroyers (DD-963) which is what Congress paid for in the 1970's versus the Kidd-class (DDG-993) which was the original design before Congress cheaped out. Pea shooter is right. Had to go back to the yards to get real weapons later on at much more expense.

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Re: weapons?

@ Jack of Shadows

"... which was the original design before Congress cheaped out."

You are wrong.

The Spruance class came before the Kidd class, and were specialized for the anti-submarine warfare role. Which they performed very well.

They were designed for and with space for, additional weapons which were not ready in time to be fitted as the first units were commissioned, but were, as you said, retro-fitted later.

The Kidd class were originally a modified Spruance designed for the Imperial Iranian Navy as specialized anti-aircraft ships.

After the Iranian revolution in 1979, the Navy was happy to take delivery of the four ships, which were brought up to USN sensor and electronic standards, and subsequently renamed the Kidd class.

More info on the Spruance class here, and on the Kidd class here.

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Re: weapons?

Could use the Royal Navy technique of shouting bang with your fingers in your ear... doesn't waste so much expensive ammunition, doesn't break the ships hull, doesn't get anything dirty... top job

Or (again as with royal navy) you can fit the necessary tools to fire the weapons but save money by not having any missiles or shells.

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Childcatcher

Re: weapons?

A lot of ships seem to be going the way of vertical launch missile silos...

Have an upvote, AC. The USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is a guided missile destroyer and this is exactly what was done, with the design providing better safety and storage options on a number of levels. Additionally, it looks like this ship might get, or already have, a railgun as part of her armament. It will not take up a lot of room, either, but packs quite a punch.

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Leak

"a seawater leak into the auxiliary lube oil system for one of her main propeller shafts"

Probably a leak from auxiliary sea water into the lube oil system via a heat exchanger.

Good reason for the oil pressure in the heat exchanger to be higher than the water pressure: so that oil leaks out instead of water leaking in.

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Re: Leak

Oh dear! That would result in your ship being declared non-operational in the middle of a battle due to excess pollution...

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has Apple patented this yet?

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Devil

Has Apple patented this yet?

Well, it looks like a bit of origami perpetrated by someone high on tumbleweed, so they probably have ...

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Simple Fix

The solution is simple: Just keep it somewhere dry.

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Re: Simple Fix

It's more complicated than that, actually. There are four things that are really bad for equipment in a marine environment, those being water, salt, oxygen and sunlight. Some would add a fifth, human stupidity.

HTH :-)

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Launch Mistake

It looks as though they have launched it upside down, perhaps that is why water is leaking into the prop tube. The props are probably airboat props al la the Everglades.

I'll bet that thing has a wet deck in a bit of a sea, it doesn't look as though you could stay on the pointy end in a storm for more than a couple of seconds.

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Re: Launch Mistake

Agoraphobic? Can't afford psychotherapy? Join the USN and travel the world while staying indoors all the time. It wouldn't surprise me if the lifeboats launch like the pods in 2001 so the crew don't need to go outside. It seems to have less available deck than a submarine.

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Re: Launch Mistake

It is definitely not a sailing man's boat but then I guess the whole thing is filled with nerds on keyboards.

I have to say, being on deck during a bit of weather and having some kind of horizon to look at is better than being battened down below even if the horizon is moving quite fast and going up and down a lot.

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Re: Launch Mistake

> it doesn't look as though you could stay on the pointy end in a storm for more than a couple of seconds.

I don't think US Navy sailors and sailoresses are allowed to do the whole Kate Winslet bit.

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Alert

Does it have a 'PooP' deck?

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Here I was expecting some sort of computer breakdown

And it is just an old school water leak. Oh well, I'm sure it will have something odd happen to it eventually, like only turning left below the equator or something fun like that!

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TJ1

Weapons: 750 x 155mm shells, 2 launchers, 154km range

It's a few things but the 155mm launchers are a 'traditional' naval gun platform, although looks like another application of asymmetric warfare.

It's ironic that for general navigation and interaction with civilian vessels they are going to have to hang damn great RADAR reflectors on the sides so that other vessels can 'see' it!

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This ship was due to carry a railgun. It didn't work to schedule, so it carries 2 155mm canon. (as well as missiles etc)

The tumblehome is little to do with radar. The point was to create a wavepeircing hull, to provide stability for the railgun/guided shell launcher. This boat sinks (it has ballast tanks fitted to flood before firing). The problem with that is that it will basically unstable in this configuration, and liable to capsize in anything greater than a force 4/5 (as waved are likely to crash the deck)

So imagine the hull 6 feet lower in the water, moving at 10 knts (to fire). Generally low radar profile doesnt matter when 10 24LB shells per minute are detected!

It might be a submarine after all!

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Fair weather sailors

@ John Jennings, "and liable to capsize in anything greater than a force 4/5 (as waved are likely to crash the deck)"

IIRC the East coast Scottish sailing trawlers who used to fish for herring, never left harbour unless at least force 5 was in the offing as they needed that much wind to power the sails to move the huge drift nets or trawls.

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FAIL

Sigh!

Long ago before the very first piece of the keel was laid down, that was all tested in tanks and in simulations. You know, the same things we as a species have been doing when building ships for the past 140 years.

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Anonymous Coward

Missed headline...

Shirley you missed a headline opportunity:

Shafted ship shuffles shoreward...

navy girl limping home after unlubed shafting...

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Anonymous Coward

> The futuristic $4.4bn vessel, which features a so-called “tumblehome” hull

A feature common in warships of the 1900s...

The radar minimisation is based on the angled flats of the superstructure; they are arranged such that the reflected radio waves are bounced away from the radar receiver so less reaches it.

When the sea starts getting up the ship will start to roll (something exacerbated by the tumblehome) and the large flat sides will be constantly swinging back and forth going from minimal radar cross section to an extremely effective radar reflector.

The Zumwalt is going to be the one on the radar screen that's flashing...

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This looks terribly like the A yacht. Perhaps that was also low radar signature to minimise assassination attempts by aircraft...?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_(motor_yacht)

That was built for a Russian oligarch. And it didn't go wrong. For obvious reasons...

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Son of a friend was captain of that "A" boat for a while.

Never saw him without a gorgeous russian bird at close hand. That ship is one heck of a fanny magnet.

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Oh the lost opportunity

of calling it the USS Enterprise. After all, CVN-65 is inactive.

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