back to article Microsoft's ARM blunder: 7 reasons why Windows RT was DOA

Industry doomsayers were circling Windows 8 like buzzards before it even launched, but they picked the wrong carcass. Microsoft's real 2012 roadkill was Win8's ARM-powered cousin, Windows RT. The chattering class's comparisons of Windows 8 and Windows Vista are premature – it will take several more quarters before we can gauge …

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h3

If you are using Metro on Windows 2012 you are doing it wrong.

(Maybe the first time bootstrapping active directory you want to use the wizard but in that case do it in a VM and use the option to save the powershell commands. Then run them on a server core instance as intended.)

Terminal Services / VDI is seperate.

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Facepalm

Give it time

Let's pretend for a moment that Microsoft isn't as dumb as everyone thinks when it comes to business.

1) a high price tag on Surface limits the number of consumers who will spring for it. Nearly every developer I know preparing apps for Windows 8 has bought one and we consider it the reference platform for Windows RT development.

2) the API for Windows store is a much bigger pain in the ass than we expected. After 20+ years of using almost the same APIs for Windows development, it's actually slapped some of us silly. Many developers by nature are in fact procrastinators with cause. We prefer to wait for the final version of the OS to ship before we start porting to the new platform. It makes it so we can benefit from the stabilization that comes with other developers submitting bugs and Microsoft adding APIs which are needed. In my case, it wasn't until the last month before RTM before the API for keyboard handling I needed came about. In addition, some of us old dogs are trying to stick to old tricks and it isn't always working.

3) a bunch of us are waiting for third party libraries to be released before we move forward. I for example have developed my apps as a Windows desktop app with WPF while waiting for the libraries I use to compile using the new sockets layer.

4) text rendering is a big problem and documentation is still not good enough. If all you want is the same crap apps as iPad or Android, get one of those. But when we develop for Windows, we deal with a more fickle audience and it's extra important to get it right. Don't believe me, ask Corel. They've developed half assed applications on Windows for years and the current generation doesn't even know their name. I'll spend an extra three months getting my Windows app right as opposed to releasing iPhone or Android quality crap.

5) tricky change for developers who want I code apps for both desktop and metro. It's quite hard to do it. Often you have to write your code twice. As much as Microsoft had made it easier. It seems impossible to maintain a single copy of a library for both Windows Store AND desktop in the same project file. This really makes it more complex.

So, a higher priced tablet which seems to sell mostly to developers makes a lot of sense. Windows RT will fly when developers catch on. The restriction on desktop apps was a great idea as it forces many of us to code for Metro.

All I can say is, give it time. It will happen. I think once we get out heads around how to develop both desktop and Windows Store apps, it will make a huge difference.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Give it time

Looks like you're ashamed to admit you've been tricked into wasting hundreds of dollars on a Win RT. Don't feel too bad about it!

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Day

Re: Give it time

"So, a higher priced tablet which seems to sell mostly to developers makes a lot of sense. Windows RT will fly when developers catch on. The restriction on desktop apps was a great idea as it forces many of us to code for Metro.

All I can say is, give it time. It will happen. I think once we get out heads around how to develop both desktop and Windows Store apps, it will make a huge difference."

I think that this is a very serious misunderstanding of the tablet market. Nobody (apart from developers who bought into Windows 8) cares about how easy it is to develop for. How many developers are going to persevere through the problems, given the small market share? Look at what you posted: problems with the Windows Store API; problems with third-party libraries; problems with text rendering; problems with coding for desktop and metro. How many successful iOS/Android developers are going to bother? How many new entrants to the market are going to go with Windows 8 rather than one of the two market leaders?

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Facepalm

Re: Give it time

Don't Google have a reputation for just giving away gear like this to developers who turn up to their conferences?

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FAIL

Re: Give it time

Uhh... I paid $800, invested two days and made $9000 on it. Where did I lose money on it?

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Meh

Re: Give it time

You just said you were spending an extra 3 months on your app to get it right but now you are saying you only took two days?

If your app is so great and better than anything on iOS or Android, care to name it so we can all see how good it is?

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Happy

Sure

First to clarify, the profit I made was from porting libraries to be used by others. No released app yet. So there's nothing to see here.

The application I'm developing is an SSH client integrated with Visio which also has thumb oriented macros targeting Cisco and Juniper configuration.

I did present this discontiguously. My apps take longer to write. My customers apps take longer to write. It is because we're all waiting for the infrastructure to establish. This takes time.

On iOS, it took years for libraries to all make their way to iOS and even now it an often be problematic. Android is an absolute nightmare for libraries at time since you have to mar the judgement call of whether to diddle around writing Java code which is useless for you on other platforms or if you'd prefer to use native code instead which also is a half assed option. Blackberry is semi-ok since you can port half assed Android apps to be half assed Blackberry apps using their Android compatibility layer.

When MS finally permits native code on Windows RT, and it almost certainly will happen once they feel that there is enough Metro apps, Windows RT and Window 8 will be the same tool. Windows RT was strategically amazing. It's like iOS and OS X. You have a great deal more limitations on Windows RT (like with iOS) but instead of the Apple stupidity of making it so you have to choose to develop for either iOS or OS X, you can write one app which runs on both Windows RT and Windows 8.

Then you have Google making ChromeBooks with a full OS which runs Java, but they don't even have Eclipse up and running on it. That is SOoooo lame. Like "oh... You want to make an app for Android. Yeh, go get one of our competitors products, we can't do that"

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Devil

Re: Give it time

Microsoft have away Samsung Series 7 Slates at their build conference. An AWSOME machine. I've used the one I bought with Windows 8 over a year now. Once Surface Pro comes out, I'll even stop carrying my ebook reader with me (iPad 3). I only need two tablets with me when I'm working. One for work and one for ebooks and watching videos. I use the Series 7 Slate for work as the iPad is useless for that. I use the iPad for the high red screen. 206dpi will be fine when I get the Surface Pro. The I can have useful computers with me. ;)

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Re: Give it time

what the hell, someone who has taken the time to get down and dirty with a piece of technology writes a thoughtful response about that experience and where he thinks the technology is going and gets 30 downvotes while copy-paste rah rah linux rants get the opposite? I'm personally not an MS fan, I use Linux when I can, but this is sad and juvenile.

For what it's worth, the killer for me is that the surface doesn't come with RT Pro, outlook and active directory integration. My work laptop is basically an outlook client and power point player-- a surface could easily replace it if MS only had clean integration with their enterprise offerings.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Give it time

Frankly Sean, I feel sorry for him. He's taken the time to post an in-depth explanation, point by point, of precisely why nobody in their right mind should ever code for WP8. The redeeming point is that he's smart enough to write libraries he has a market for, unlike apps which will never make a penny.

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Facepalm

How many people, so much money spent...

and they got it so horribly wrong.

Not even governments fuck up that bad.

I would have told them it was a FAIL for only 1% they paid their top marketing consultants, and I'd still be quite well off from the income.

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BHP's measure ability in dollars

If you only charge 1%, that is how much your opinion would count. To get listened to, you need to charge double.

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Re: BHP's measure ability in dollars

Oh all right, I'll take 2%

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Big Brother

Re: How many people, so much money spent...

> Not even governments fuck up that bad.

I challenge you on this!

As of March 2006, approximately £4.5 billion had been spent by the United Kingdom in Iraq.

All basically tax transfers to well-connected people, so one might actually consider this a "just as planned", but still.

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Happy

Re: How many people, so much money spent...

Just as planned by Gen. Custer: get your scouts killed pushing Windows RT, retreat to the Surface Pro hill, find out your PCs are outgunned by Chrome Books with rapid fire voice and gesture reading by camera (not tablet). Finally find the solution Windows 9 for people who want to work fast using less inhumane interfaces on their PCs.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: How many people, so much money spent...

£4.5 billion. That's considerably less than half of what they wasted on abandoned and unfit for purpose NHS IT projects.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: How many people, so much money spent...

> Finally find the solution Windows 9 for people who want to work fast using less inhumane interfaces on their PCs.

Of course - just as the solution for Ashton-Tate was dBase V.

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Re: How many people, so much money spent...

Yes to your last paragraph, but what the US spent in Iraq is more than the budget for a manned mission to Mars, and most of that would have gone to the same military industrial complex, for a much bigger PR impact and potential return.

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P_0

I'd still buy a Surface if:

1. It let you install Chrome or Firefox.

2. It was about 20~30% cheaper.

3. There were some good "goofy" apps (games like angry birds etc), for the family.

But I wouldn't be using it for any serious work. I still don't understand why the netbook market collapsed. I love netbooks. An Atom powered netbook running Windows 7 (or Ubuntu) still feels way more powerful than a Surface.

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"I still don't understand why the netbook market collapsed"

In order to be viable, netbooks needed to be cheaper than the lowest cost laptops around. That meant they needed to be lower spec hardware and not incur the cost of a Windows license. And that meant they had to run desktop Linux. Which, it turns out, was universally hated by just about everyone who bought a netbook. The return rates on them were astronomical, hitting nearly 50% for some vendors. And that made them an incredibly expensive mistake for the manufacturers. There were a few attempts to bail themselves out by re-using the parts for XP netbooks, but by that point they were the selling at the same price as cheap laptops and just didn't make sense to consumers.

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Holmes

Netbooks, for my money, failed for the same reason that many devices do - they never evolved or changed.

I love my netbook, it is precisely what I was looking for - a very light, extremely portable laptop at a reasonable price.

I bought a Samsung NC-10, as it had the best feeling keyboard, about 4 years ago. Yet if I look at the latest Netbooks (the few that there are), at the same price - the hardware is all but the same (single core, 1.6GHz processor, 1GB ram, 10.1" screen, 200GB or so HDD). Either the price should have dropped or the spec should have got better, neither is true to any great extent.

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If I had to buy a tablet, I'd buy a Surface before an iPad or Android.

If it comes with Office then its about 10X as useful as an iPad or any Android tablet. If I were going to shell out $600+ to stab at gorilla glass with my fat fingers all day, I would definitely buy the one with the useful programs on it. Anything else is just an overpriced toy. If you just want to play games, you could get 2 of the most powerful PS3's bundled with the latest games for the price of one top of the line tablet from Apple or Samsung.

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FAIL

Re: If I had to buy a tablet, I'd buy a Surface before an iPad or Android.

You really want to "stab at gorilla glass" all day working with excel? Excel is a fantastic program, but it's one of the most keyboard bound and tablet-unfriendly apps ever written.

If you want to use office, get an ultrabook.Better keyboard, better processor, and probably cheaper. Totally pointless to use a tablet with Office.

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MJI
Silver badge

Re: If I had to buy a tablet, I'd buy a Surface before an iPad or Android.

Stuff that if you want to play games in your hands just get a Vita, it is cheaper and the games are games, as to that OLED screen.

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Re: Anything else is just an overpriced toy

The consumer market *want toys* and the current tablet mass market is consumer led. The iPad demonstrates they'll happily buy 'overpriced toys' as well if the brand is right. What MS ignore is that neither 'Microsoft' or 'Windows' are desirable brands and for some they even have negative value, not worthy of overpricing. And Surface RT is overpriced.

Microsoft built what they need to sell, not what customers want to use. The bulk of the buying public just aren't interested in working on their tablets and bundling Office isn't as compelling a feature as you and Microsoft believe. They didn't bother mentioning it in any of the consumer facing promotion in any case so it's rather irrelevant.

The corporate market have different issues that bundling Office doesn't overcome.

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Re: If I had to buy a tablet, I'd buy a Surface before an iPad or Android.

I don't believe Microsoft were mistaken in giving us a tablet and desktop interface, if you see yourself mostly using a tablet and sometimes needing Office the Surface RT can provide that but if you see yourself working mostly on the desktop it's the wrong device in my view. Hooking up an external monitor, keyboard and mouse won't fix that, it's simply not a full blown desktop replacement if you need more than Office.

The bigger issue for me is the lack of apps and high quality apps, it's been out for months and it's still missing some of the most popular apps, even if they had the best hardware and OS no one would care until it has the apps they like/want to use.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: If I had to buy a tablet, I'd buy a Surface before an iPad or Android.

Nobody buys the best device for the job these days, people buy something else and then try to hack/mod it into doing something else.

People will buy a games console and try to turn it into a computer.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Anything else is just an overpriced toy

When tablets came out they were evaluated by many companies. Finally a portable computing device that would last a working day.

When they replaced my gas main the engineer was using an iPad to record test results. They're not toys if you have an imagination.

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Mushroom

Re: If I had to buy a tablet, I'd buy a Surface before an iPad or Android.

You obviously havnt used Office 2013 yet then. It works just fine on a tablet.

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Thumb Down

Re: If I had to buy a tablet, I'd buy a Surface before an iPad or Android.

"If it comes with Office then its about 10X as useful as an iPad or any Android tablet."

How about if it's not real office but some half assed hybrid that can't handle macros.

This is the strategy MS pursued when they advertised Office for Palmtops.

It looked compatible.

But it wasn't.

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Fairly obvious

If Microsoft decided to torpedo their primary product, Windows, and replace it with crap then why would we expect them to pick the best hardware to run it on? I agree that Surface is a nice piece of kit. Very nice. But the Microsoft brains were out-of-gear when they were thinking about the whole package. And don't even MENTION Windows 8 on a 24 inch monitor. Geez, garish, ugly, unusable. OK, I mentioned it. Sorry.

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I have a Window RT Surface. It was a gift, never would have paid for one. I also have a Nexus 7 that I did pay for.

1. Windows RT devices are too expensive - 100% true. For that kind of money almost anyone would buy an iPad, some will buy something else and keep the change. Finding that there are ads in some of the built in apps...

2. The software stinks - True again.

Apps. Large numbers of the apps are more useless then fart apps, I've found quite a few that don't even work but still got into the store. Top Paid and Top Free include a lot of apps with low ratings, very few ratings, or even zero ratings.

Active tiles - Arrrg. Flip, Flip, Flash Flash. All turned off except weather and news. Can't lock tiles in place, move one in a group and you never know what it's going to move.

Desktop - Office, it's better then the Office apps for Android, but the one time I tried to do work on it excel kept crashing but the same file worked fine on my desktop with Office 7, and I ended up plugging in a mouse. All the stuff in Windows 8 (or Windows 7 other then strat) is still there, once you look under the tacky phone UI all the non touch stuff is there. For example connecting to my printer (connected to an XP box) was exactly the same as it was with Windows 7. First I had to add an entry in the HOSTS file (using notepad), but I didn't have rights to edit it (even though you get an admin account by default) so I had to take ownership of the file, give my self rights. Now I can resolve the XP box. Now a manual printer install, pick a "close enough" printer since I can't download a driver, and I'm done. But non of this is a touch interface, you need that keyboard with touch pad, or even a real mouse. This OS is Frankenstein in a dress. VPN only supports basic stuff, can't connect to the SSL vpn at work, Cisco say that they don't have enough access to make their VPN work.

3. Microsoft is competing with itself - I don't really see that as the problem. They should not have called it Windows (even more so for Phone). It's not Windows XBox 360, so why Windows Phone?

4. Microsoft is competing with everyone else, too - That's to be expected, but they are not doing a good job, see 1 and 2.

5. Windows RT is too closed - They want to be Apple. Worse, the desktop is there, but you can't add anything.

6. Hardware OEMs haven't bought in. They know it's mostly dead.

7. Microsoft's marketing sucks - They are trying to be Apple again. But people know what an iPod is already... Window RT? WTF is that?

Two other things...

Charging - No USB charging. You can only charge with the Brick, and a second brick will cost you $40. Every other tablet I've used supported USB charging (might be slow but it worked). And it seems to suck quite a bit of power in standby too.

Video Out - It's standard micro HDMI (good) but they don't tell you and try to sell you a $40 adaptor when a $5 cable works fine.

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"Windows RT devices are too expensive"

Maybe that's true. I thought £699 was OK for a Yoga 11, so I bought it.

"The software stinks - True again"

Really? I find plenty of good apps and it all just works for me.

"Active tiles - Arrrg. Flip, Flip, Flash Flash. All turned off except weather and news. Can't lock tiles in place, move one in a group and you never know what it's going to move."

I assume you're not very clueful then, you choose exactly where a tile goes, and it is entirely consistent with what happens. Hasn't caused me any pain yet. the Live tiles is one of the things I like the most - at home - where I have the usual mix of "social" stuff, and news etc etc. At work it's less useful, since 99% of my work uses normal apps. But it's nice having one way to find stuff.

"Desktop - Office, it's better then the Office apps for Android, but the one time I tried to do work on it excel kept crashing but the same file worked fine on my desktop with Office 7, and I ended up plugging in a mouse."

You have updated to the final release and not the beta right?

"First I had to add an entry in the HOSTS file (using notepad)"

Presumably because you've not setup your network and/or printer properly then.

"but I didn't have rights to edit it (even though you get an admin account by default) so I had to take ownership of the file, give my self rights."

Or you could have just run notepad with elevated rights, y'know like the system requires to get enhanced privileges. You made that hard work for yourself.

"Now a manual printer install, pick a "close enough" printer since I can't download a driver, and I'm done. But non of this is a touch interface, you need that keyboard with touch pad, or even a real mouse."

That's right, because you're doing stuff the wrong way.

"This OS is Frankenstein in a dress. VPN only supports basic stuff, can't connect to the SSL vpn at work, Cisco say that they don't have enough access to make their VPN work."

Well maybe you need a better vendor then. Because other people are making things work.

"3. Microsoft is competing with itself - I don't really see that as the problem. They should not have called it Windows (even more so for Phone). It's not Windows XBox 360, so why Windows Phone?"

"5. Windows RT is too closed - They want to be Apple. Worse, the desktop is there, but you can't add anything."

...and the benefit of the "closed" system is less junk and less stuff to break and such. Apple don't *just* do it to make money.

"6. Hardware OEMs haven't bought in. They know it's mostly dead."

*looks at Lenovo* etc etc

"7. Microsoft's marketing sucks - They are trying to be Apple again. But people know what an iPod is already... Window RT? WTF is that?"

...and at last we agree. Microsoft's marketing is really crap. As is/was Nokia's. For example, the Nokia N97 (which was an awful phone, but I digress) had an advert that never really told you what the benefit was. Apple went "oi mush you can do THIS" and people went and bought it. People often think it's the ONLY device that can do this (actually it's often the worst/last device, but the marketing still wins them).

"Charging - No USB charging. You can only charge with the Brick, and a second brick will cost you $40. Every other tablet I've used supported USB charging (might be slow but it worked). And it seems to suck quite a bit of power in standby too."

I can't speak for the Surface, but I would imagine it would take so long to meaningfully charge a device of this class it wasn't included because it is stupid.

"Video Out - It's standard micro HDMI (good) but they don't tell you and try to sell you a $40 adaptor when a $5 cable works fine."

you've never shopped at a PC world have you... :-)

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blah blah, blah...

As someone who actually *has* a Lenovo Ideapad Yoga 11, running Windows RT I can't disagree more with the premise that RT is DOA.

Everything I care about bar 1 app is there, and the remaining one has a web interface that works in IE anyhow.

I get the benefit of Win8's interface on my laptop, desktop and my yoga. The same apps, sync'd settings. And with the yoga, I get amazing battery life so I can actually use it all day without an issue.

YMMV of course, but it's really a bit unfair to say it is DOA.

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Re: blah blah, blah...

why is it "unfair to say it's DOA" when the EVIDENCE demonstrates just a paltry 1 Million sales of RT Tablets in a launch quarter ?

The list of complaints here are valid, and verified especially with the terrible UI that was noted since the BETA's, the Community Preview, the RTM, etc by everyone from tech journo's, testers, and even UI experts.

Microsoft were TOLD from the start the UI was a problem, and the company decided to go with it anyway citing bullshit "telemetry" research that apparently showed people weren't using the Start Menu anyway.

sure, nobody uses the start menu, and it's totally NOT a way to force people to use the unified Metro UI of the new touch-optimized interface that matches Windows Phone and XBOX ?

sure, not a ploy to FORCE everyone away from 40+ years of WIMPS UI evolution, and i guess there must have been a reason to kill desktop GADGETS right? because apparently there was a "security risk", which was easier to kill the entire platform instead of, you know FIXING the risk ?

and Aero Glass, that's gone too for no good reason, not even an option anymore (although a nice prick-tease with the transparent taskbar left in).

face it, Microsoft bet the farm on a new UI and it failed terribly, and the tablet sales are hard evidence that people don't want it.

Microsoft simply doesn't understand mobile, they never have. From Windows Mobile 5, 6, KIN (killed the entire platform in 6 weeks, gotta be a record!), Windows phone 7, 7.5, 8....

How many times does Microsoft reset and re-boot, burning consumer and developer bridges, blatantly demonstrating they don't understand mobile before people notice ?

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WTF?

Re: blah blah, blah...

The Yoga 11 is little more than an OUYA ($99) with a 720p screen in a pretty laptop... and you paid HOW MUCH?

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WTF?

How long can Ballmer stay in charge

Whats' harder to fathom then all of Microsoft's blunders is how they keep the same leadership. All these blunders have really happened on Steve's watch yet he continues to be there. A look at HP, Intel, AMD, Yahoo, Dell even Google(Schmidt given a back seat) have CEO's pulled on much shorter leashes. What or who is keeping Ballmer in charge ? Are Microsoft's stock holders so enamoured with MS office sales that they over look the companies utter and complete failure in web and mobile technologies.

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Silver badge

Microsoft seems to be a victim of [tablet] dynamics

It can't win and it can't break even. Unfortunately, neither can it break out of the game.

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Linux

Extremely funny

Microsoft has fallen in the Linux pit. Not saying they where digging it for Linux on the tablet, perhaps, but now they expect something still worse to sell. An expensive stripped down Windows, even worse than Linux for surprised customers and unsure sells personal.

Haa haa haa. Do not get me wrong, I have used Linux on the desktop since 97. The demand to copy Apple "designing" the hardware I can understand as a wet dream by Ballmer (try again). Haa haa haa

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rgh

Interesting view

I have been using the Surface RT since it's release date. It has replaced my desktop and laptop in the office. There are a number of reasons why this is only the first pass for Windows RT. Consider this over the next year or two, all new apps will be written in the Windows 8 store. So, after a year or two, why would you ever go to the desktop? All apps will run in the Metro interface. The reason for this bet is simple, Apple bet on ARM, Microsoft bet on Intel for tablets. Apple won that bet and it cost Microsoft in a huge way. It's a smart move to play both sides of this fence. After a year, they will no longer be competing on backward compatibility.

For another view, check out my blog. I talk about specific experience using the RT device as a daily driver:

http://rghnews.wordpress.com/2013/01/09/microsoft-surface-as-a-daily-driver/

Just so you know, I leave every day, I don't take a charger for my tablet. I use the tablet to make phone calls (Skype), work in office, connect to work stuff through Citrix, surf the web, write, research, play some games, etc. You get the picture. I see it has been mentioned, but at home, I have a full desktop in my office downstairs. I can remote control it from anywhere in the house and it behaves as if it's running natively on the Surface. Swipes, installs, run anything, etc.

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Re: remote control

I run a 2048x1152 primary monitor and it doesn't feel big enough (hence the 2nd monitor and planned 3rd one). I really don't care how well remote control functions, on a 1366x768 display that's a scrolling mess simply not usable for real work. Perfect for remoting your laptop with it's poor 1366x768 screen (but why would you do that, it's portable), useless for any desktop monitor shipped in the last 5 years.

So a nice feature for occasional casual use, not a life changing advantage for most.

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Linux

Re: Interesting view

"After reading so many other reviews, however, I am struck by the fact most authors spend a very limited time with a [device] before reviewing."

Interesting blog post, and I'm glad the Surface works for your use cases. Your phrase above could be applied to Ubuntu/Unity, Gnome Shell as well just by changing the word in square brackets to Interface.

The message I get from this discussion is that it is all about use cases. We now have a range of devices/UIs that are focussed for specific kinds of user. Out of band users will find the device/UI frustrating - they will be working 'against the grain' so to speak.

Perhaps we just have to deal with the fractured market now.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Interesting view

Backward compatibility is Microsoft's greatest asset. What sort of genius came up with a plan to create (multiple!) versions of Windows that can't run Windows software? Does their HR department recruit people at random from some sort of day centre?

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Re: Interesting view

The anecdotal trap: just because it works for you doesn't mean that the criticisms of the article aren't wrong. It sounds like you have bought an expensive remote control for your desktop.

Sales of 1 million in a quarter including Christmas are just plain dismal: the market has rejected Microsoft's value proposition and this despite huge advertising and marketing campaigns. Apple already has the walled garden and through the volume of its sales has convinced by developers and corporates to let it into their space. For the masses cheap Android tablets are proving increasingly attractive media consumption devices that are extremely portable, significantly more so than the Surface and the reason why Apple has developed the I-Pad mini. Where is the Surface mini? And why has Samsung so noisily abandoned the market?

You are right to point out that more and more apps will be developed for Metro, though how many will be compiled for ARM remains to be seen. Windows RT might just be a stop gap for Microsoft while Intel and manufacturers work on Surface Pro tablets which might well prove popular, albeit by cannibalising notebook sales but only in significant volumes if they are cheap enough.

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Too high priced?

Surface RT costs $100 less than the comparable 32 GB Ipad, and offers a lot more for the money (like Office).

Get your facts straight.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Too high priced?

Get your facts straight. .. office RT does not support macros so for anything more comple than a basic spreadsheet you are stuffed.

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Mushroom

Re: Too high priced?

No Macros isnt much of a limitation for mobile use. It still has fully functional Word, One Note and Powerpoint too. Its much better and more poweful than Google Docs, Libre Office, etc..

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Re: Too high priced?

And the Nexus 10 costs even less and offers arguably even more…

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