back to article Ecuador says 'yes' to Assange 'freedom' deal, but Julian says 'nyet'

Wikileaks alumnus Julian Assange has apparently turned down a proposed deal that would have seen him leave the Ecuadorian embassy he has been camped out in for over six years. The government-secrets spaffing outfit on Friday confirmed that it would not be taking a deal that Ecuador has struck with the UK that would have given …

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                1. Frumious Bandersnatch Silver badge

                  Re: Double down?

                  "double down" makes sense. You lose a bet, then place the same bet again... that's doubling down (probably soon to be "doubly" down).

                  1. Blake St. Claire

                    Re: Double down?

                    > "double down" makes sense. You lose a bet, then place the same bet again... that's

                    > doubling down (probably soon to be "doubly" down).

                    AFAIK gamblers who double down (or double up), e.g. at the roulette wheel, usually don't last long; either they run out of money or they are "invited" to leave the casino and not come back.

                    There's a bet in Blackjack called double down, or doubling down. When dealt two cards totaling ten or eleven you may double your bet and you get one more "down card", i.e. a card dealt to you face down that nobody else can see. (For the card counters.) Often the odds are good to be dealt a ten or a face card and thus a good chance of either winning or tying with the dealer.

                2. Anonymous Coward
                  Anonymous Coward

                  Re: Double down?

                  > "Double down" makes no sense

                  Double Down is a bet in Black Jack, where it does make sense. It appears to have entered the lexicon as a synonym for Double Up much the same way that "I could care less" has become an acceptable* alternative for "I couldn't care less."

                  > 'arry 'oudini sat in the 'erb garden - Yes or No?

                  Are you French? I had a French colleague once who could not voice the Haitches in any word. Not for love nor money. I have met nitwits who pronounce the Haitch in Herbs and Spices. My SiL's father is Herb(ert), pronounce the Haitch please. AFAIK Harry Houdini pronounced the Haitches in both of his names, but he's not around for me to ask. I believe I've heard Ms. Rowling (rhymes with bowling) pronounce the Haitch in Harry Potter.

                  *Well, acceptable for some perhaps. Probably only to those who use it.

                  1. BitEagle

                    Re: Double down?

                    At the risk of pouring patrol on flames, "aitch" only has one aitch.

                    Do with this information what you will.

                3. Jamie Jones Silver badge

                  Re: Double down?

                  @Cardinal - I admit, I inherited "double-down" from the American political channels.

                  However, along with what Frumious Bandersnatch says, if making an error is "down", then doubling 'up' on it is doubling down.

                  I largely agree with the rest of your post, (and I didn't downvote you)

                  Maybe I should stop using Americanisms... My bad. Have a nice day :-)

                  1. DropBear Silver badge

                    Re: Double down?

                    Coming from a non-English speaking country I can only offer an outsider's anecdotal, strictly non-academic (and at least somewhat impartial) perspective, but to be honest I have encountered "double" or "double down" used plenty of times yet I have never, ever heard or read "double up" before today. Which is not a comment on what may "officially" be right or wrong - just a remark offered at face value...

                    1. Jamie Jones Silver badge

                      Re: Double down?

                      "Coming from a non-English speaking country"

                      Which country would that be, if you don't mind me asking?

                      One tends to work out - or guess - where some of the posting regulars are from..

                      Whilst I initially had you down as Australian (yes, too obvious) I long since had you pegged for British.

                      I'd love El Reg to show the country code of posters.

                      1. Anonymous Coward
                        Anonymous Coward

                        Re: country code of posters

                        I'd love El Reg to show the country code of posters.

                        I fear that won't help you much in my case as I travel a lot :)

                        Me is also no Englisch Nasjional but it's not that noticeable when I speak*, I just have the occasional glitch in my written use of English. That said, I never sell myself as a native, irrespective of the language I am speaking (I speaketh several, and I assume probably all of them badly :) ).

                        That said, my sense of humour is finely attuned to the darker British variant, having grown up on a diet of Fawlty Towers, a bit of Fry & Laurie, Monty Python, Not the Nine O'clock News and Rowan Atkinson's later episodes of Black Adder, and I have no problem with understanding the full content of the earliest Cambridge Footlights (The Letter and the chess game being my favourites), and, despite being exposed to the German language I still Do Not Use Capitals Inappropriately (it would only be for nouns anyway, but just the sheer wear on the shift key would annoy me).

                        It also means I am a tad more relaxed about mizspelt words as long as they don't deliberately seek to obscure meaning, I am with Stephen Fry on this..

                        So, you can have your flags, but it may tweak any prejudices exactly the wrong way. Which, I may add, could actually amuse me :).

                        * I am in awe of people who can mimic manners of speech and accents, a skill I do not possess.

            1. Tom 38 Silver badge
              Headmaster

              Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

              I meant queue, I typed queue, if I had intended to type cue I would have typed cue, if I had intended to type que, I also would have typed que. Which part of this do you not understand?

              So you're just a moron then? "Cue" - a signal for something to start. "Queue" - an ordering of items. You clearly used the former meaning and the latter spelling, why are you still arguing about how clever you are?

              [Edit - go on then, which of those comes first in your "queue"?

              Queue the tabloid and Fauxnews muppets virtue signalling and regurgitating their echo chambers]

              1. JimC Silver badge

                Re:Queue/Cue - Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

                I suppose you could use the verb form of queue in that context, in which case the sentence would have the sense of some outside party arranging the muppets in a line. Bearing in mind the apparent tin foil hat belief system of the poster, he/she possibly thinks its the CIA placing all their muppets in line.

                It does give us an insight into the poster though: rather than admit : "OK I typed queue instead of cue, so what, bite me" we have this aggressive posturing to defend the basically indefensible. Now I think of it that does seem awfully appropriate...

            2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

              Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

              "Shit my mistake, I of course do not know what I meant, and only you know"

              You may well know what you mean. But if you can't communicate your meaning in a reliable and accepted manner, is it any wonder that no one else knows what you mean?

            3. This post has been deleted by its author

          1. FlamingDeath Bronze badge

            Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

            "Queue isn't a verb which can be used like that."

            Crikey, dont ever visit this site, exposure to etymology might make your head implode

            https://www.etymonline.com/

          2. Gerry 3
            Boffin

            Verbal subjects

            > Queue isn't a verb

            I queued for a bus: that makes 'queue' a verb in my book.

            > Us sheeple will just bugger off...

            Nope, should be 'We sheeple...'. Stones, glasshouses and all that.

            1. Rich 11 Silver badge

              Re: Verbal subjects

              @Gerry 3:

              > Queue isn't a verb

              I queued for a bus: that makes 'queue' a verb in my book.

              Can you explain why you truncated your quote of what I said after just four words? Could it be that if you'd quoted all of my statement your dismally limited attempt at a point wouldn't stand?

              > Us sheeple will just bugger off...

              Nope, should be 'We sheeple...'.

              There's this thing called colloquial usage. Sometimes even respected authors have been known to use it. Now I'm not a respected author in the class of John Steinbeck or even Irvine Welsh, but I am at least aware of their existence. And if the concept of rhetorical devices has passed you by, I am so sorry.

              1. Gerry 3

                Re: Verbal subjects

                Some of we think that this is taking the post off topic, so us will have to agree to disagree.

                1. Rich 11 Silver badge

                  Re: Verbal subjects

                  Don't expect me to agree. You've just demonstrated once again your lack of comprehension regarding the nuances of English, thinking your tortured example is in some way shedding light on the matter. Go find a primary school teacher willing to spend an hour or two to explain it to you.

          3. hititzombisi

            Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

            They are spelled the same in Russian, I guess...

        1. Velv Silver badge
          Headmaster

          Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

          I actually did mean queue, as in a line of people waiting for something

          When you’ve already dug yourself into a deep hole you can’t get out off it’s not usually a good idea to continue digging.

          1. FlamingDeath Bronze badge

            Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

            Look, I understand, you buy newspapers, you read newspapers

            I suspect you probably also frequent a pub too, and talk to people in the pub

            I can easily imagine you have a social media account of some kind and get all of your facts from there

            Echo chambers are a wonderful thing, until someone from outside your echo chamber challenges your world view.

            As to digging a hole, I literally have no idea what exactly you're referring to.

            https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=queue

            Sorry, I dont do cliques, maybe you do...

            1. FlamingDeath Bronze badge

              Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

              I feel like I've just run the bell curve gauntlet, that was exhausting, communicating with muppets

            2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

              Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

              "Echo chambers are a wonderful thing, until someone from outside your echo chamber challenges your world view."

              Challenges from people outside appear not to have any effect on your world view.

      1. FlamingDeath Bronze badge

        Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

        I feel I need to ask the question, because it is quite early here in the United Kingdom, is Alister American and giving an Englishman tips on spelling and grammar?

        Irony?

      2. The Nazz Silver badge

        Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

        re Cue, not queue.

        One of the things i like about the comments section of The Register is the wide range of comments made from people around the world. Many of whom do not have English as their mother tongue, though of which many have a much better grasp/use of the English language and grammar than i have.

        The last time i read "Right on queue" was on Twitter from a young woman who also proudly posted her "First Class Degree" certificate, in English Language, from Sheffield Hallam University (formerly known as Sheffield Polytechnic - when i was there, lol). Hardly a typo is it.

        Not bad for £40,000 debt eh?

        Edited to add in *in English Language*.

        1. BitEagle

          Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

          Don't you get a "right on queue" at the Labour Party Conference Momentum meetings?

    1. briandavies

      Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

      Bollocks.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

      Please show me any other political prisoner sitting in a place where they can just walk out whenever they want to. Please. You're insulting political prisoners like Assange has insulted proper asylum seekers with his attempts to evade the consequences of his own -avoidable- actions.

      1. FlamingDeath Bronze badge

        Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

        "Please show me" your face, AC

        Have a packet of these it looks like you need them

    3. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

      "Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of "

      He's not a prisoner, neither political nor otherwise, and never has been. At worst, he was under house arrest in a stately home until he skipped bail and self-imprisoned himself in the embassy.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

        He's not a prisoner, neither political nor otherwise, and never has been.

        However, despite all his many machinations to avoid it, he is likely to be one in the future -hopefully the very near future- so we can go back concentrating on real problems and the odd cat video.

    4. BitEagle

      Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

      He's in Equador, legally, where he isn't a prisoner. He will be a prisoner when he enters the UK again.

    5. cream wobbly

      Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

      Queue

      It's "cue". A queue is a line of people. A cue is a prompt. When you queue things up in a process, you only cue up the one thing at the front of the queue.

      But you have "independent thought" so you probably don't call it "English". Carry on.

    6. Scorchio!!

      Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

      "Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of "

      Oh really? Who locked him there, and why did he flee Sweden to the UK some years back? What are his politics BTW?

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Five minutes ago...

    Five minutes ago, none of the posts had a thumbs down. Now they all do. Looks like Julian's astroturfer friends have a web-crawler going looking for comments mentioning his name.

    Thumbs down for this post arriving in 3...2...1...

    1. SWCD

      Re: Five minutes ago...

      Shit, sorry, pressed the upvote button :-\

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Five minutes ago...

      LOL, let them come. I need them to balance my upvotes. Maybe we can test if El Reg uses an integer for it :)

      1. Adrian 4 Silver badge

        Re: Five minutes ago...

        It's a pity the anti-whistleblower astroturfers have outvoted them now. I guess the home office lackeys have nothing better to do with their time than knit sock puppets.

  2. Wilhelm Lindt
    Big Brother

    Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

    Dealers work for profit. Disappointing to see El Reg denigrating activity that remains indistinguishable from its own milieu of tabloid journalism.

    1. Mark 85 Silver badge

      Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

      He's not working for profit? How does he support himself when not an embassy guest?

      1. Rich 11 Silver badge

        Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

        How does he support himself when not an embassy guest?

        On sunlight and love of his fellow man.

        1. James O'Shea Silver badge

          Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

          "On sunlight and love of his fellow man."

          He likes men, too? And here I was sure that he's hiding out because of a slight problem with women...

        2. Chronos Silver badge

          Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

          How does he support himself when not an embassy guest?

          On sunlight and love of his fellow man.

          IIRC, it was alleged indiscriminate love of his fellow humans that got him into this fix. Edward ended up in Russia, poor Chelsea ended up in The Glass House. Exile or clink, they live with the consequences of their conscience every day and the world is at least a more honest place because of their sacrifice.

          Julian's predicament, on the other hand, was wholly avoidable and came about as a result of something which had no contributive effects for humanity or Wikileaks at all: Him getting his end away. Without that, Sweden would have had no grounds to issue the arrest warrant - which not even Malfoy Major himself has suggested is outside the bounds of due process - and we wouldn't be hearing about this attention whore's antics every week.

          1. Mark 85 Silver badge

            Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

            and the world is at least a more honest place because of their sacrifice.

            Up to a point maybe but as far as the targets of whistleblowing, I'd say no. If anything, it mad said targets go darker.

    2. Gordon 10 Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

      There was me thinking every utterance out of his tiresome gob was used to profit his own desire for attention and relevance. Silly me.

    3. Velv Silver badge
      Headmaster

      Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

      According to reports from 2010, shortly before he skipped bail and exiled himself in Ecuador, two thirds of Wikileaks salary bill was salary to one Julian Assange. That makes him a professional, wikileaks dealing in secrets an all.

      1. Wilhelm Lindt

        Re: Assange is not a "professional secrets dealer"

        You still don't seem to know what a dealer is. A dealer is paid by the person receiving the secrets. If the public receives the secrets, they're just doing journalism. You have a problem with journalists being paid?

  3. Walter Bishop Silver badge
    Big Brother

    The deal being essentially worthless

    Wikileaks alumni Julian Assange has apparently turned down a proposed deal that would have seen him leave the Ecuadorian embassy he has been camped out in for over six years.”

    The deal being essentally worthless .. we'll extradite you but not to face the death penality.

    after six and a half years of confinement to the building, Assange is starting to wear on the South American nations nerves.”

    Or else the financial bribes and threats are beginning to have an effect.

    The road is clear for Mr. Assange to take the decision to leave,” Mr. Moreno said, citing written assurances he said he had received from Britain.”

    Wikileaks editor says media is giving the U.S. cover to extradite him

    Ecuador-US Security Deal: Is President Lenín Moreno Opening Door for US military presence?

    World Bank approves $400 million in new financing for Ecuador ...

    1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: The deal being essentially worthless

      "World Bank approves $400 million in new financing for Ecuador "

      Can we clarify this? Are you saying that the US, via the World Bank, is paying $400 million to have Assange extradited?

      I'm sure Assagne would love that interpretation - it must be getting close to his own evaluation of himself.

  4. FlamingDeath Bronze badge

    Perspective

    Lets get some perspective here for the benefit of all of the mindless drones with short memories that seem to be on this site (I feel bad saying that, but it's become pretty apparent)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rXPrfnU3G0

    The President during Operation Overlord, as part of his exit speech to the American people as president, warned of the military industrial complex.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      The president during Operation Overlord

      ...was FDR. You mean of course President Eisenhower, commander of SHAEF during Operation Overlord. I doubt it's news to many here that politics is thoroughly corrupted but can you explain how this is manifest in this case?

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