back to article About to install the Windows 10 April 2018 Update? You might want to wait a little bit longer

The troubled Windows 10 April 2018 update is facing another issue, with some users losing access to their desktop after installing the new code. The problem, which first appeared in a posting on a Microsoft support forum on 14 May, has gained a bit of traction over the last two days with users taking to social media as they go …

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Coat

Re: Not Avast Me Hearties!

looks like Avast FAILED to recognize Win-10-nic as "the virus"...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Not Avast Me Hearties!

My machine is fine. It’s a Mac.

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Re: Not Avast Me Hearties!

"Sample size of 1. Conclusive proof then."

One sample is enough to disprove the hypothesis that Avast is to blame.

Now if your hypothesis was that some versions of Avast in some configurations and in some combinations with other software is to blame then it wouldn't be, but that wasn't the allegation.

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FAIL

Re: One sample is enough to disprove the hypothesis that Avast is to blame.

Um, sorry but that rule is for science stuff, not computer stuff.

Even if you could apply that rule, it would have to be understood that all computers ran the exact same programs on the exact same hardware, and that is just impossible.

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Re: Not Avast Me Hearties!

I updated while runing Avast. The update got to 24% then just... stopped. I left it overnight, no change, so I rebooted and rolled back. At the time I wasn't aware that Avast might cause problems, so I may give it another go with the AV package disabled.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Not Avast Me Hearties!

> My machine is fine. It’s a Mac.

So is mine. It's a Raspberry Pi. And I have a pocket full of cash I didn't spunk into Apple's wallet.

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Neighbour's laptop updated on sat morning, did exactly this, friend in ca.us just posted on twitter they have the same was was able to tell them what they need to get and do.

I'm expecting some more.

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Anonymous Coward

Do you get the choice?

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Windows Schrödinger edition

Is it alive or is it dead - you only know when you come to use it next time. Its a good job that the people attempting to use the machine don't depend on it for their livelihood or anything.

I'm so glad that I'm not playing this game any more, Penguins and Apples all the way

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

"Is it alive or is it dead - you only know when you come to use it next time."

If Microsoft is going to enforce updates at a time of its choosing (at least for home users), maybe every copy of Windows should come with complimentary external storage large enough to back up the system drive and prompt to plug it in to make a backup before making the updates, on the off-chance that it's going to cock things up.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

Disabling the Windows Update service and manually unplugging your internet connection might help when you shutdown or sleep your PC.

It's the only way to be sure that nothing happens the next time you start using your PC.

I might go Apple all the way in future. Maybe keep a dual boot Linux/Windows box for running vintage gaming stuff.

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

It really feels like they bring the quantum uncertainty alive. I updated my computer over lunch yesterday and afterwards some recently edited files were just gone. It was subtle enough to make me doubt my sanity.

Fortunately, the backed up versions were fine, lost about an hour there (on top of waiting through the bl**dy slow update procedure).

Oh, and I don't run Avast, but some locally mandated Ahn V3 thingy. Don't get me started on that one.

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

Disabling the Windows Update service and manually unplugging your internet connection might help when you shutdown or sleep your PC.

It's the only way to be sure that nothing happens the next time you start using your PC.

The unplugging the internet will work. Disabling Windows Update, maybe not. Windows 10 has "self healing" updates, which is MS-speak for "We will find and remove your tricks aimed at regaining control over updates." I think there's a task in the Task Manager that you can find and eliminate, but each time Windows does update (should you allow it), you can expect all of these things to be put back, and you'll have to go through and undo them all again.

As Joshua would say, it's a strange game.

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

The only way you can be sure that Windows 10 will not update is to never expose your computer to the internet.

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

"I'm so glad that I'm not playing this game any more, Penguins and Apples all the way"

I've had plenty of failed Linux updates and Apple has a history bricking its stuff, as a quick search here will show.

Nobody gets updates right every time.

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

Oops!

I wrote "task in the task manager" when I meant "task in the task scheduler."

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

with so many updates it means the product aint right ever.

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Trollface

Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

"maybe every copy of Windows should come with complimentary external storage large enough to back up the system drive"

Yeah, a couple of TB of what ever Microsoft's cloud storage is called, and several months of transferring everything, that'll be what they give you. Oh wait, doesn't Win10 slurp all your files anyway? Then the only need to transfer things back when things go wrong. Or the NSA can.

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Linux

Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

MS certainly had a much better track record though, back during XP days. I certainly don't remember an XP service pack causing this amount of problems so often.

And wasn't the fall update, the creators update and a few in between just as bad? Wasn't one update a test update that accidentally got released and bricked a few million machines?

On release didn't windows 10 have serious issues with drivers? Even now there are blogs dedicated to what to do to turn off Windows 10 things just to make GFX work. (I know as I have had to go through them to make Nvidia GFX work so things go full screen and not windowed)

MS has fallen very far behind where it used to be liked and trusted.

I have used Linux for ten years and only had 1 failed update by comparison. that was a Kernal problem with Dell native drivers and it killed the WIFI and bluetooth drivers - in Ubuntu 14.04. They are so rare I even know when and what it was.

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

Does anybody know which URLs or IP addresses Windows 10 reaches out to to update from so I can blacklist them on my route? I'm sick of Windows 10 updates wrecking my PC. The last update wrecked my wifi drivers and no matter how many times I remove, update, reapply them it just won't work.

I'm now having to use an external USB wifi adapter :-(

Thanks.

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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

"Does anybody know which URLs or IP addresses Windows 10 reaches out to to update from so I can blacklist them on my route?"

I know this wont help you, but my one and only Windows box is a development box, purely coz people where paying me for that. It has a white list of those few IPs I needed for the work, nothing else can get through.

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Happy

Re: Windows Schrödinger edition (Simon Harris)

"on the off-chance that it's going to cock things up."

I've a doubt regarding that sentence in your comment. Is it irony or sarcasm? 8^)

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QA Anyone?

Avast is a well AV vendor so one would think that updating Bloat 10 would be tested by Slurp in house before unleashing the spyware on to the masses.

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Unhappy

Re: QA Anyone?

Micro-shaft doesn't do 'QA' any more. They fired all of their QA staff just before releasing Win-10-nic upon the masses. Yeah no $#!+ this really happened!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: QA Anyone?

QA? Insiders are nincompoops, not professional testers.

Also, the 'QA' has been 'outsourced' to the users who're the first to update. SatNad's little cunning plan to cut costs and 'engage the Windows community'.

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I had exactly this problem on possibly the first of our computers to have this upgrade, took me many hours to sort out (finally by downloading a fresh installation of Windows 10 version 1803 from Microsoft to a usb stick).

My questions

why did my "invitation" merely talk of new features, and not warn that this was a full version upgrade?

why was I not warned to disable antivirus programmes? (Yes, I use Avast on all our computers)

why is there not a warning to back up all data and programmes before installing these "new features"?

.

Most unhappy with Microsoft for another forced change which has cost me valuable time, I could have been watching a version of the Great British Bakeoff or planning the route for tomorrow in my HGV , or even sleeping.

I dream of sleeping .....

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Talking to my dad the other day (by phone, he's 50 miles away, so I'm only guessing), it sounds like he has the same problem.

Does the Windows re-installer wipe the desktop and user areas as part of the re-install or is all the old data recoverable afterwards?

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I couldn't find anything. Now that I've done a clean install (but beside the old versions) I can get to my files (which I always make directories for on the C drive and never use the "user" area), and I can use some programmes. I haven't put anything on the new desktop yet apart from firefox, irfanview and avast.

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This! Microsoft should have issued the warning, strongly.

I ran into this problem on 3 different laptops all using different Virus/Malware protection. The best option if you get hit is to chose to roll back the system to the state before the update. (don't bother with system restore it doesn't work for this large of an update), then turn off the Virus/Malware protection, update, check for more updates, update whatever it offers, reboot then reactivate your virus/malware protection.

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DJV
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an hour or so?

"waiting the requisite hour or so for the update do its stuff"

In my experience it's been more like 3 hours minimum! Good job it's not my main PC - that one's being kept on Win7 for the foreseeable future.

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Shiver me timbers.

I've one in the other room that's updating right now. It runs Avast. I am going in there now; I may be some time

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Re: Shiver me timbers.

It was fine.

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Re: Shiver me timbers.

It took 16 hours?

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More like the five stages of a Windows 10 update: frustration, fury, despair, resignation (to a full re-install), and downloading (of Linux).

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Happy

I Saw No Problems (- No ships Either)

The family's five machines all updated fine, even the slowest portable was done in about 35 minutes. A ten year old Dell portable was ready in less than 30. No problems so far and the first machines went through on the 1st of May, so long enough for any issues to emerge I think.

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Re: I Saw No Problems (- No ships Either)

I Saw No Problems

And at the time of my post you'd got no downvotes (nor deserved any) but all posts that implied any criticism of Mankosoft earned a couple of downvotes without any justification. So the question is, are these from moronic shills who don't know they're being used, or Mankosoft's social media team?

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Re: I Saw No Problems (- No ships Either)

"The family's five machines all updated fine" - I guess that accounts for the 5 up votes then! I'm sure you'll get more when everyone else's machines finally finish updating over the coming weeks LOL!

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Anonymous Coward

Time to fix the installation process, too !

One cannot expect an OS to install on all PCs without problems.

But we should be able to expect it to report the reason for its failure to install.

And for the installer not to repeatedly ask to install the exact same software on the same PC, over and over and over again.

Why is that beyond Microsoft ?!

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Re: Time to fix the installation process, too !

One cannot expect an OS to install on all PCs without problems.

No, but you should be able to expect that it will install successfully on the majority of non-exotic hardware. If I'm installing on some weird ass custom gaming machine, then yeah, I'll be taking a risk.

If I'm installing on a two year old Dell it really, really should just work.

And should find and set up my printer. Which Win !0 was unable to do.

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Gold badge

I was using Windows 10 for Kodi until the update. After the update I kept losing HDMI audio.

Using Linux now and everything behaves perfectly.

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Had no issues on 2 machines, but I know 1 person who got this issue and it sounds like someone else has too.

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Anonymous Coward

"Update and shutdown" would be better described as "Shutdown then update tomorrow" (when you don't have time to wait).

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Metered connection

Settings app - Network & Internet - set connection to 'metered', and avoid the auto install of all new crap. I was fortunate to get this done before this update released, so I can avoid the nightmare I had with fall creators update. Too late for many, but a trick to keep in mind for the next 'feature' update which will happen, as night follows day.

I'll permit the April update after at least the 3rd bug fix... and after a stiff drink.

Windows nags me that there are updates that need to be allowed, I shun the message.

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Re: Metered connection

Except for updates that Microsoft deem "important", and steal your bandwidth anyway.

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Anonymous Coward

Always-on updates... not that great an idea after all is it?

Made worse as Microsoft keeps cramming new (often frivolous) features with every subsequent major update, resulting in no better stability for the code. In the good old days, unless it's some archaic or catastrophic exploit, you knew for certain that the stuff fixed in SP1 wouldn't recur in SP2.

But since Windows 10 is the 'last edition of Windows', Microsoft has to polish and re-polish its turd and convince you that it's something shiny and new. In other words: 'innovation'.

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Re: Always-on updates... not that great an idea after all is it?

At some point, they'll probably re-name it to get the focus away from the turd in the sandbox. It'll still be there but just called something else, like "Windows 11"...

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Coat

Re: Always-on updates... not that great an idea after all is it?

'It'll still be there but just called something else, like"Windows 11"...'

Windows 2 Infinity And Beyond? Windows ∞ - 1? Ubuntu Whining Windows? Windows SystemD Edition?

I'll get me coat me hearties, it's the one with the longer left sleeve to cover me hook, and the parrot droppings down the back.

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Anonymous Coward

None of those Insiders have a test rig with the Avast antivirus software installed?

What's going on?

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Testing?

So what antivirus programs are the Windows 10 updates tested with?

¯\(º_o)/¯

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Re: Testing?

So what antivirus programs are the Windows 10 updates tested with?

Whichever ones consumers use while running Windows 10 for the first few weeks (months?) after the release of a new build.

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