back to article And THIS is how you do it, Apple: Huawei shames Cupertino with under-glass sensor

Huawei previously used its Primark brand, Honor, to bring high-priced tech to a much more affordable package. But this time it's using Honor to introduce a feature the industry insisted it wasn't ready for: an under-glass fingerprint sensor. The new Honor 10 – which like the P20s has an optional, removable Notch – also …

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Re: an under-glass fingerprint sensor.

"if users actually care about its quality, and as far as I can tell, they don't care at all."

I don't care about fingerprint sensors at all, regardless of quality or whether they're under the display or not. It doesn't bother me if they're on the phone, but I don't use them.

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Re: an under-glass fingerprint sensor.

Mirrored sunglasses don't stop Face ID. They may be mirrored, but they aren't 100% reflective. For some reason the wraparound sunglasses I wear when biking causes more of a problem, I have to type in my password at least half the time. Or it could be the helmet, I suppose.

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I think the Huawei brand phones are the equivalent of the Acer brand laptops.

High spec, cutting edge tech, but compromised by idiotic design faults and cheap materials in the manufacturing process.

the sort of thing that you don't (or should not) get in the high end price brands.

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Anonymous Coward

Acer?

You seem to have misspelt "Apple Laptops" there.

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Re: Acer?

I was having a little poke at the apple fanboi's but no, I didnt misspell Apple. Apple cost a small fortune to buy and have repaired by apple plus the blood of your first born, but Acer are cheap..

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More importantly: Headphone Jack

Hey Apple!

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notches ... bah

Thanks to the abusive "leadership" of Apple, phones without notches will soon be about as common as phones with slide-out keyboards. Thanks, Apple.

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Anonymous Coward

Synaptics. Whenever I hear that name I think of...

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/12/11/hp_synaptics_keylogger/

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So, what was this about?

I read the article because Register put Apple in the headline. But this really has nothing to do with Apple.

So what is Register saying, that if anyone else in the world innovates, it must be Apple's fault for having not done that? That would seem a compliment to Apple as being the biggest innovator, and others shouldn't dare to do anything.

Or is it just the usual general spray at Apple that Register has? So anytime a competitor does something Apple does not have (or do), Apple is shamed for not having thought of it, or not doing it?

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Primark

Is "primark" a typo or am I just failing to keep up (as usual)?

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Landfill radio

Most Chinese phones have cheap radios that only work on one or two carriers. The Honor View10 for the US only supports a few LTE bands (2, 4, 5, 7, 12, 17). It's designed to work reasonably well with AT&T and T-Mobile now but it will get slower as bands are traded and moved around. It won't be any good for traveling or switching to other carriers. That means fewer of these phones will be repaired once the batteries are worn out.

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Facepalm

Re: Landfill radio

"It won't be any good for traveling"

I've used my Honor 8 in the UK, France,Germany , Italy, New Zealand, USA and Hong Kong

Yeah, I see what you mean, totally shit for travelling.

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Aside from the clickbait headline, what exactly does this phone’s fingerprint sensor do that Apple’s doesn’t? They both work fine under glass.

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So when the glass screen inevitably cracks, the fingerprint sensor will probably lock you out of your phone. Definitely one for the flower children.

Except that in the case of my phone, if the fingerprint sensor misreads the print and doesn't unlock, I'm presented with a keypad to enter my unlock code. So yes you may, well probably will, lose the ability to unlock using a fingerprint, you shouldn't be locked out of the phone.

Errr, unless the manufacturer uses an incredibly stupid implementation. Ah well...

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Most devices I've seen using fingerprint readers, ask you to set a pin or password first, and will periodically ask for the pin/password anyway to unlock. They also won't let you disable/change the security settings without the pin/password.

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Are biometrics safe?

There are those that say biometrics are not safe because, while you can always change your password, you cannot change your fingerprints, retina, or facial features. In other words if the possibility exists to duplicate your biometric identity you can never get it back. It's a little like not only using the same password for several sites but also not being allowed to change the password once it is set.

That said I have a mobile phone with a fingerprint scanner on the unlock button and it is the simplest phone I've used ever.

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Re: Are biometrics safe?

The Sony solution seemed the best possible because putting the sensor on the side power button meant that there's no real chance of your accidentally leaving a nice oily fingerprint that worked right on the sensor button.

Sadly they've now gone the way of everybody else.

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Joke

you cannot change your fingerprints

Sure you can! It's really easy. That's what scar tissue is for. Just juggle a chainsaw. Or install some new plumbing under the kitchen sink. Or build a PC in a cheap chassis. And then there's liquid nitrogen. Or playing with fire. Did you remember to unplug your soldering iron? Nope. New fingerprint!

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Build a PC in a cheap chassis

No thanks. I'll take the chainsaw juggling.

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Re: Are biometrics safe?

"In other words if the possibility exists to duplicate your biometric identity you can never get it back."

This is a problem, and it's particularly bad when it comes to fingerprints because it's really easy to lift someone's print and use it to spoof fingerprint sensors.

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Go

interesting if the software can be improved too

I'm happy with my €330 Honor 9 but there is lots of bloatware and updates are not as rapid as I'd like. A stock Android is probably an unobtainable dream for phones like this which need to stand out from the crowd with "useful" features like a 3D moving lock screen.

I predict Apple will drop its iphone prices soon, like they did with the ipad to maintain market share.

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Anonymous Coward

Having recently gotten an iphone x I prefer face ID. Its generally far more reliable than the finger print sensor which is always a pain with wet hands. Does nice things like face ID for password retrieval in safari. As for the notch most apps are aware of it and work around it intelligently. Like youtube for instance by default stops videos at the notch so you lose nothing or if you want you can zoom in and lose the bit under the notch. At this point after having used face ID I'd consider moving back to finger print sensor to be a backwards step.

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FaceID vs TouchID

How does FaceID stand up when you are wearing... say a Crash Helmet or any other protective headgear?

I tried an iPhone X while wearing a bicycle helmet. Failed.

Removing a glove for TouchID is far better when it comes to 'Ease of Use'.

Facial ID as a way of getting into a phone is not the best solution for everyone.

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Anonymous Coward

But it's got a notch...

...so what's the big deal. Confused and lost here.

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Re: But it's got a notch...

Notches are annoying. But hey, it does have a jack at least.

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Those flagships are sold to photographers but in reality only vanity Instagrammers will be really happy with the results

No professional photographer at anything above the level of "i've got a DSLR and I could take photos at your wedding, therefore i'm a professional wedding photographer" will be using a smartphone in any case.

Both of the professional photographers that I have met at events carry several different DSLR's, plus a carryall of expensive additional extras such as lenses, stands, remote trigger flashes, filters and things that I don't recognise despite quite a good knowledge of photography which had the look of costing considerably more than a new car.

"it's as good as a DSLR!" though is probably good marketing for the people who only take photos for facebook and instagram though...

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The cameras in modern phones can be impressively good

They're just somewhat limited and horribly unergonomic. Maybe a third of the features of professional gear are there to enable the photographer actually to do something they couldn't do with consumer gear. The rest is ergonomics.

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Re: The cameras in modern phones can be impressively good

Yeah, I talked to some Northern-Lights-Tours-Guides recently (well.... last winter) and one of them was a photographer. He was actually quite impressed what people can do today with their mobes when out watching the aurora. He is indeed carrying a ton of stuff, and his pictures are better, sure, but he also spent a lot more on the equipment...

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Re: The cameras in modern phones can be impressively good

Yep. I don't think that realistically smartphones will ever be able to replace real cameras as there are fundamental limits to what can be achieved with a tiny fixed lens but they will undoubtedly be in a position to take the market for the really low end compact style cameras within a few years.

When that happens it'll leave the entry point for "real" cameras as being the bridge style DSLR, which is so far superior to what any mobile will ever be able to achieve as a result of having a zoomable lens larger than the mobile that they'll probably stay around forever, with "real" DSLR's with removable lenses etc reserved for professionals.

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Good

Headphone jack (YES!)

Nice screen

Finger sensor on front

Good camera

Good processor

Good storage options

Bad

Notch (why have a chin but no top bar, zero bezels really don't impress me)

Chinese spyware.

Another close but not quite phone. Nobody makes a perfect phone any more it seems.

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"Chinese spyware."

Is that any worse than the spyware from companies outside of China? I'm not seeing the difference here.

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Anonymous Coward

Some kind of preprogrammed nationalism?

Also note that if your country gets into a trade war with China and/or its intelligence agency has qualms about security in relation to Huawei, your China-purchased phone may stop functioning as a phone altogether when local mobile carriers are prohibited from providing signals to it. I still don't fully believe this tinfoil hat conclusion, but having investigated several times with my carrier, using different SIM cards and different handsets, and read a bit of Chinese news, it does unfortunately fit the facts.

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Ultrasonic Dog Abuse!

Bonzo will be deafened!

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