back to article Homeland Security drops the hammer on Kaspersky Lab with preemptive ban

Despite pending legislation to ban US federal government offices from using Kaspersky Lab security software, Homeland Security has issued a Binding Operational Directive demanding that the products be removed within 90 days. The directive gives government IT managers 30 days to identify which – if any – of their systems have …

Silver badge

Re: Oh, come on

More like I do not believe the ferals about K because they are known, serial liars. Also, there are other AV products made outside of feraldom, if K is Putin's pocket who is say that the others are not in someone else's back pocket. So far, we have innuendo from the ferals alleging K is a bad boy but not even a whiff of smoke to back it up.

17
1
Silver badge

Re: Oh, come on

>>"So some of you seem to be saying that a Government has no right or obligation to protect itself?"

I think rather that we are saying a government protecting itself is not necessarily the same as a government protecting us. As many have observed, not only are we more likely to be spied upon by our own state than a foreign one, but our own state is far more likely to act in a negative way to us as well. If I anonymously leak something the government wants not to be known, or associate with someone the government doesn't want me to associate with, it's not going to be the Russian police who show up at my house. And if secret information is used to prosecute me for something, it's going to be that acquired by my own government, not by Russia or China.

>>K[aspersky], as do most others, "phone home" quite often. Oh, not to worry, they are all "checking for updates", that's all. But who has a packet sniffer going constantly to examine such communication and, further, has the ability to decipher exactly what may be in the transfer?

Well actually, not only do independent security researchers do it privately but I'm also certain that if Kaspersky were downloading something it shouldn't that we would have heard about it. Companies like Norton or McAfee or TrendMicro would love to be able to report "Our rival spies on you! Buy from us!" And they have the expertise to find such malicious behaviour because they are industry experts themselves (Well, TrendMicro are, anyway. ;) ). Equally, the NSA would drool at the chance to expose evidence of Kaspersky wrong-doing if they actually had any. I guarantee we wouldn't just be hearing "banned because maybe they might" if the NSA could pin something on them. So definitely there are parties monitoring for the things you say and quite expert parties at that. And their motives would unarguably be to expose anything they found.

12
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Oh, come on

And Kaspersky paid a fee to Michael Flynn, the elder, when still a Trump "good guy", why, exactly?

0
2
Anonymous Coward

Re: Oh, come on

"Well actually, not only do independent security researchers do it privately but I'm also certain that if Kaspersky were downloading something"

Shirley, you meant "uploading something"? I know I did.

2
0

Re: Oh, come on

"K, as do most others, "phone home" quite often. Oh, not to worry, they are all "checking for updates", that's all."

Then get your IT infrastructure set-up correctly. You have a internal server that handle all the updates, so the antivirus on the PC will not phone home And if your PCs carry so sensitive information, they should not be allowed to connect to outside anyway.

8
0
Silver badge

Re: Oh, come on

>>Shirley, you meant "uploading something"? I know I did.

Poster I responded to was talking about it updating itself with something nefarious - either software updates or dodgy malware definitions. So yes, in this context it is downloading.

1
0
Windows

Re: Oh, come on

"Equally, the NSA would drool at the chance to expose evidence of Kaspersky wrong-doing if they actually had any"

Truth never bothered them. If they had no evidence, they'd just manufacture their own!

(Stupid child!)... :)

4
0
Silver badge

Re: Oh, come on

"But who has a packet sniffer going constantly to examine such communication and, further, has the ability to decipher exactly what may be in the transfer?"

The NSA?

2
0
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

All of the above

1) Kaspersky may be legit now but a government takeover could produce a software update where it's not.

2) That same government might instead decide to empower the anti-virus tool to discover planted malware that the US government wants to remain secret.

3
2

China has AV software?

Just wondering what they replaced Kaspersky and Symantec with...

I haven't found any AV that has protected users from users successfully yet... but I'm always looking.

2
0
Anonymous Coward

protecting users from users

a 36 inch hardwood yardstick in the hands of a matronly woman dressed in a nun's habit walking the aisles might form a good starting point for any plan you design and implement

2
0
Anonymous Coward

"Bloomberg reported it had seen emails between chief executive Eugene Kaspersky and senior Kaspersky staff, outlining a secret cyber-security project apparently requested by the FSB. Bloomberg suggested that the tools not only deflected cyber-attacks, but also captured information about the hackers launching them, to pass on to Russian intelligence services. Also in July, the US government's General Services Administration removed Kaspersky Lab from a list of approved vendors."

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-41262049

3
0
Silver badge

I don't really have a problem with Kaspersky reporting information about cyberattackers to the Russian government. I would not have a problem with an American AV reporting that to the American government either, even with me being as critical of the US government's spying as I am. Cyberattacks are criminal actions with real victims... while the US government does way too much of going after nobodies who never meant any harm, it does have a legitimate role in going after the actual people out there causing real (not imagined or potential) harm. Same goes for the Russian government.

I don't see that as nefarious at all.

5
0

Probably says more about US antivirus software than it does about Kasperski

5
0
Happy

Suddenly

I feel reassured about our recent decision to move to Kaspersky.

6
0

Not the same thing.

It's worth noting that China banned Kaspersky software from government contracts in 2014. But it also banned Symantec's code from its systems as well. Only Chinese security software is on the approved purchasing list.

The US is blocking Kaspersky because it might have a Russian controlled back door in it. China is mandating Chinese AV because they know damn well there is a Chinese controlled back door in it.

8
0
Silver badge

Odd...

...considering they are leaving Donald Trump in the White House.

1
0
Slx

It won't be too long now before you have to install your "America First Chip" to access online services.

3
0

Something about horses and barn doors...

It's funny/scary that this plan only works if Kaspersky AV ISN'T a threat.

If it is a threat, the software has had administrative access to the machine and can affect the deepest levels, and the only certain remedy would involve scrapping hardware. They don't appear to be doing that.

4
0
Meh

In plain sight?

"There are two possibilities...1...Kaspersky is a tool of the FSB..."

If so, you'd think the FSB would choose a more American name, perhaps "Dexter" or "LeRoy".

2
0
Anonymous Coward

" impact of Russian regulations and policies on the company"

Interesting.

I recently contracted with a small software house in England who supply, among others, Kaspersky. An edict came down from them that "No Contractors!" were to work on any of their bug fixes, enhancements, change requests etc.

We happened to have a subcontractor in Ukraine at the time.

0
0

Is it paranoia --

-- if they really are out to get you?

All of the US intelligence agencies (16 of them? I forget) agree that Russian actors used 'cyber'-stuff to influence the recent US election. ('Cyber' --what a bad prefix. But it covers internet dis- and dys-info, voting machine hacking, and a range of other computer-related attacks and activities, so I guess it stands.)

The Russians have played naive Americans for fools (see D. Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner, et al), and have turned Americans into Russian tools (see ex-general Michael Flynn, now under threat of felony charges for serving Russian interests in the Middle East. Again, et al.)

Point being, we know that Russian interests are actively infiltrating and subverting Western systems.

From a Western perspective, Putin's government is corrupt, authoritarian, and militaristic; and Putin has expansionist hopes. The nature of Russia's oligarchic power structure means that corporate leaders find it very much in their best interest to cooperate with high-level political actors. If they do not cooperate, then their business may not survive. And they may not personally survive (see Boris Berezovsky, for example). Eugene Kaspersky, and his company, have survived. It's typical that we would not know what deals a Russian businessman made under whatever tables in order to prosper in that milieu.

I think that the NSA are quite good at gathering info, and I think they are quite overwhelmed by the volume they are collecting. I think they usually can't find a cow in their massive haystacks of data, let alone follow threads back to each hidden needle in the haystack. IMHO, the Russians have the NSA well outclassed in offensive tactics and strategy. I think the NSA (and other agencies in the know) are running scared. They don't think that they have the ability to know if Kasperksy is on the up-and-up, even given source code.

There is therefore probably a large amount of hand-flapping going on, but also quite a volume of genuine cold sweat -- because of what we know about Russia, its leaders, its sophisticated and aggressive actions, and its current level of antagonism toward the West.

Is this more like historical McCarthyism, or more like historical Cold War era intelligence battles?

4
3
Silver badge
Meh

None Too Smart - But that's the US 'Intelligence' Lot

There are programs used by the US Government departments that have thousands of lines of code written by subcontractors in other countries. And I am thinking China and Russia, as well as India, etc. And these reams of code aren't identified as "Written by Russians" either. One of the few ways to identify such code is to check them for comments buried in the code.

The DPRK is smarter, it will allow NO ONE other than North Koreans to touch the code for either rocket or any other military projects. In fact, Foreign Guest Workers aren't allowed anywhere near any military hardware or software production!

Some of the Russian security services have reverted to using TYPEWRITERS which are very hard to 'hack'.

Obviously this an attempt to persuade US corporations to 'buy American' so the NSA, et al, can deploy THEIR backdoors without having to struggle with decoding the foreign code! Obama went around the word bad-mouthing HuaWei products, whilst the British ALLOWED HuaWei to set up development labs in Banbury, with oversight/cooperation from the GCHQ.

Meanwhile, back in the US of A, things still are akin to Harry Belafonte's "There's a Hole in my Bucket" with all and sundry saving a fortune on R&D stolen from military contractors as the systems remain little changed. Seen the latest Chinese fighter planes?

2
0

It's funny

It's funny because, the only reason the US used Kaspersky in the first place is because it is the best.

It's funny because they should have never used a foreign countries software on government systems in the first place.

It's funny because now they will be less safe.

It's funny because this is really out of spite by the CIA for outing Eternal blue, that was used by the CIA and popular hard hitting ransom ware for criminal activity.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

VEEAM too?

If the Gov't is scared of the Russians via Kaspersky, What about VEEAM who actually store data and are owned by the Russians too.

1
0

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018