back to article Private sub captain changes story, now says reporter died, was 'buried at sea' – torso found

The story of a Danish inventor and a missing Swedish journalist has taken a bizarre turn, as Peter Madsen now claims he buried Kim Wall at sea. Madsen, being held on manslaughter charges, told a Copenhagen court Monday that the reporter perished when the 26-foot-long UC3 Nautilus submarine, one of the only privately funded …

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Whatever the truth is...

It will be bizarre as all hell.

I can think of several potential explanations, none of them make sense and that includes the cold blooded murder scenarios.

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LDS
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Re: Whatever the truth is...

I believe the truth is not bizarre at all, even if it includes a private submarine. It is not the first case of women killed on a boat and their bodies dumped to sea. And the reasons are usually plain old ones.

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Re: Whatever the truth is...

Excessive bitching?

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Pirate

Does it have a torpedo tube? Did the journo 'accidentally' fall in and kick the launch button with a flailing leg (attached or otherwise)?

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Anonymous Coward

My money is on it being Osama Bin Laden.

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Cut the crap, Peter - you are only making it worse.

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Once the words "torso found" have featured in the story, exactly how much worse can it get?

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Anonymous Coward

Mad inventor type with own sub that sinks, missing reporter, inventor's story changing by the day, headless and limbless torso pulled from the waters ... and we're meant to believe that "The Bridge/The Killing/Show me the money/etc" are fiction?

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Occam's Razor

The simplest explanation here doesn't involve some bizarre accident, 'burial at sea' somehow while the sub was already crippled, and then a changing story.

The simplest explanation I can think of involves the age-old bad things that can happen when a man gets a woman alone in a place she can't escape from, and a fracas ensues, followed by a panicked disposal of a body and deliberate scuttling of the sub.

Not that I'm saying that's what actually happened, its just the simplest sequence of events I can think of that fits the known facts. His (current) story may indeed by true, although if this is the case, he has done nothing to help himself by initially lying.

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Re: Occam's Razor

Something that happens pretty much every day somewhere in the world. The only thing different here is the submarine.

Commentards have joked and said their puns are only harmless fun and stop virtue signalling. So if the dead person was a ten year old boy? Would it be as funny? I agree with loyal commentator that the simplest explanation is that a woman was trapped, knew the fear of death, was finally murdered, and her body butchered, and perhaps my virtue is so achingly sensitive that I am not amused, but I'm not.

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Re: Occam's Razor

I'm going to risk the wrath of the commentards by replying to this.

It shouldn't make any difference if the victim was a ten year old boy or a sixty year old man but it probably would. I think (hope) that most commentards do not find the details of what seems most likely to have occurred in any way amusing but humans do seem to try to dissociate from the horror of a thing by playing around the edges. And punning is probably the least aggressive of these approaches.

I can understand people finding this to be harmless fun and I can understand those who think it isn't. I doubt that anyone would make the same jokes if it had been an acquaintance of theirs that suffered this appalling fate but in that case the tragedy is too close to disarm in this way.

The untimely end of a human life, probably in conditions of fear and isolation, is not funny but language does help push the monster back into the cupboard.

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Re: Occam's Razor

"So if the dead person was a ten year old boy? Would it be as funny?"

Funny or not, I suspect it might generate the same level of punnery. People write puns because the context invites it (e.g. 'bizarre'), not because it's socially appropriate. Therefore within certain extreme boundaries, pretty much anything will get punned.

Humour also helps people process unpalatable news; hence why people often recount amusing recollections during a funeral eulogy.

Oh, and you put some thought into it, but still - #virtuesignalling.

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Re: Occam's Razor

Or she didn't like the look of his torpedo so he made her walk the plank instead.

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Re: Occam's Razor

I've been there thanks.

And denying other people their fun doesn't actually help or make it better. Best let them get on with it, at least some good happens.

We don't need gladiators to shut everyone down on our behalf.

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Anonymous Coward

FFS!

"one of the only privately funded crafts"

It's 'the only' or 'one of the few'.

This kind of thing makes my brain itch.

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Re: FFS!

I suspect that the intended meaning is "only funded privately", i.e. there are a number of craft which have been funded exclusively by private funds, and this is one of them.

So...yes, this reads badly - a decent writer should have been able to arrange some words to make the phrase more meaningful.

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Re: FFS!

It's fair to say something's only little or you only have a few of something, so why not say one of the only (few) crafts?

It's like: One of the - only few in number - crafts. Except it's contracted because that's what the language did to it apparently.

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Re: FFS!

Weren't there some drugs gangs who built some subs to smuggle drugs into the USA? Would those count as privately financed....?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: FFS!

No!

The 'only' means the sole, single, solitary 'one'. For a single sample of a small group then 'one of a few'.

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Trollface

Re: FFS!

No!

The 'only' means the sole, single, solitary 'one'. For a single sample of a small group then 'one of a few'.

I think we are the only ones to agree on that...

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Re: FFS!

I may be wrong, but I don't think any of them had the capability to fully submerge (required intake and exhaust to remain above the surface), which may be part of the the definition of "submarine".

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Re: FFS!

I think Hans meant that Shaun meant "one of the financed-only-by-private-equity crafts"

I.e. the "only" applies to the financing, not the number of crafts

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Re: Jamie Jones

Yes, that's what I meant.

I may have failed to explain myself clearly in a comment about stating things clearly. The irony of this is not lost on me.

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Re: FFS!

My brain itch comes from people using 'crafts' as the plural of 'craft' in this context.

The plural of craft (as in a transportation device such as a sailing vessel or aeroplane) is also craft - there is no 's'

e.g.: 'On a Sunday, the busy waters of the Solent are packed with many craft such as pleasure vessels and sightseeing boats'

Conversely, the plural of craft (when referring to handicraft or ability) *is* crafts.

e.g.: 'He is skilled in the crafts of knitting and embroidery'

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Re: FFS!

And "one of the only" is what happens when people think "well, spell-check didn't flag it, so it must be okay."

break - brake, rein - rain - reign, they're - there - their, these regularly turn up in professionally edited articles. I noticed the trend start in newspapers in the mid-80s. People began trusting their tools too much almost immediately, "because computer."

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Something worth remembering

Being dumped in the water for several days can dismember a body. It's odd for it to have successfully removed all the limbs, but it's not beyond the realms of possibility. I'm personally aware of one headless body being found who had died from natural causes and fallen into a stream. Incidentally, don't ever drink from mountain streams, you don't know what's polluting it half a mile upstream.

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Re: Something worth remembering

Half mile? On one hill walk I could see someone drinking from a stream while a sheep pissed in it about 30 yards upstream.

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Re: Something worth remembering

Extra fresh

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Re: Something worth remembering

My old college lecturer used to like reminding us how this happened to him, he saw people drinking from a stream, half hour walk up the stream, and there was a pile of dead rotting sheep in it...

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Trollface

Re: Something worth remembering

"My old college lecturer used to like reminding us how this happened to him, he saw people drinking from a stream, half hour walk up the stream, and there was a pile of dead rotting sheep in it..."

For a fast running mountain stream, 1/2 mile of well oxygenated water, probably perfectly ok as far as the pile of dead sheep go. Maybe not so for liver flukes nor human sewage from the nearest tributary aka the local farmer's septic tank.

Never drink from one of those lovely little streams which issue from a Cornish* cliff. Now you know the likely source.

* Cliffs are available elsewhere - you don't need to go all the way to the south west to get sick.

You can find a sorts of nasties under a bridge. So I'm told. >>

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Re: Something worth remembering

"Half mile? On one hill walk I could see someone drinking from a stream while a sheep pissed in it about 30 yards upstream."

Rule 34, probably.

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Re: Something worth remembering

That is why we have Tea. PG-tips will cloak any rotting thing, maybe even also the seepage from used tires and fried transformers!

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Re: Something worth remembering

We have something here known as beaver fever (Giardiasis). They are nearly invisible parasites that inhabit what looks like perfectly clean water in lakes and streams. I always use a Zeolite water filter. Giardiasis can make you very ill.

When symptoms occur they may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Vomiting, blood in the stool, and fever are less common.

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Re: Something worth remembering

Not to mention that if you do find a perfectly clear stream with nothing nasty looking growing or living in it, your first consideration ought to be whether that's because it contains pesticides.

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Just a note. According to the courts he originally told the courts that she had died and he had buried her at sea, but due to closed doors that information was not revealed.

About a week later it was decided to release this information partly to end any discussions of searching for her, and what could have happened.

So he might initially (when he was pulled from the boat) have given one story, but - as far as I know - he has maintained the now-revealed version of events from the very first day in court - that is last Saturday.

http://www.dr.dk/nyheder/indland/retskorrespondent-peter-madsens-forklaring-skal-afmystificere-ubaadssagen (second to last section of this article)

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Coat

I bet....

there is some seamen involved......

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Newsnight report that goes overboard* on the Scandi noir camerawork.

* fill in own inappropriate joke here.

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A accident on board and he buried her at sea.

I don't believe a word of it.

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'A accident on board and he buried her at sea.'

He could have accidentally brutally dismembered her...

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Bah!

Sounds about as reasonable as pulling the rugs and seats out of a brand-new car and hosing it out being a "normal" cleaning regime.

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Terminator

Re: Bah!

What? You've never had to do that?

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Unhappy

What Sailor Has Ever Heard of ...

burying a person at sea on what is essentially a day cruise?

Were there even sleeping quarters on this rustbucket? Was the 'submarine' in international waters?

Likely she had discovered something untoward with the 'financials' and had asked too many of the wrong questions.

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Starting to make sense.

The Beeb is now saying that the body was deliberately mutilated and the submarine is believed to have been deliberately scuttled.

So he faked an accident and killed her, reasons to come later. His only mistake was underestimating our ability to recover corpses from the ocean.

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Re: Starting to make sense.

Not only deliberately mutilated, with the arms, legs and head removed, but also in a way which appears to have been an attempt to prevent the buildup of decomposition gases, the torso was also attached to some metal as ballast.

It's sounding less like the honourable "sea burial" that was first implied, he clearly didn't want the torso to be found.

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Snip < one of the only privately funded crafts of its kind > snip. Surely The only OR one of the few?

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Anonymous Coward

Fall guy for a ritual sacrifice a la Dutroux / Saville?

If his behaviour is highly out of character, he could have made these statements as a patsy under duress / or to fulfil some faustian bargain.

Maybe someone who financed it wanted an inescapable torture chamber?

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Well, the dismembered body was her after all

BBC News have it as a DNA match (although my fingers automatically type DNS).

I suspect Mr Madsen has some significant explaining to do...

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Re: Well, the dismembered body was her after all

"Traces of blood have been found inside the submarine, and they also match Ms Wall."

Doesn't leave him much wriggle room

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A guess

He started dismembering the body as he was unable to lift it whole through the various hatches. However she died he wanted rid of the body quickly, that is not a good sign IMO.

As as an old twisted bitter git with a sick sense of humour can I just say some of these comments that concern a recently deceased individual are terrible, I know this is the internet but seriously could you not give it a couple of months before naff joking about her death?

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