back to article Road accident nuisance callers fined £270,000 for being absolute sh*tbags

A Hampshire company behind millions of nuisance calls regarding road traffic accidents has been fined £270,000 by the Information Commissioner's Office. The ICO's investigation into the business traced more than 22 million automated nuisance calls to Basingstoke-based business Road Accident Consult, trading as Media Tactics. …

Re: My policy is...

Sadly, in the UK, it is illegal to use any profane language across any telephone. So, do not swear!

I want to know who the scum are who take this excreta up on its offers?

Let's teach logic and schepticism in schools, perhaps? Sadly that's not going to happen for obvious reasons.

2
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: My policy is...

"Sadly, in the UK, it is illegal to use any profane language across any telephone. So, do not swear!"

citation please - i dont doubt you at all, i would like the reference!

1
0
Silver badge

Re: My policy is...

Bollocks. You can 'ing swear all you want, because they called you.

What you can't do is phone someone else up at random and swear at them.

Anyone calling you is fair game.

0
0
Silver badge
Gimp

Re: My policy is...

"Sadly, in the UK, it is illegal to use any profane language across any telephone. So, do not swear!"

citation please - i dont doubt you at all, i would like the reference!

Communications Act 2003 section 127 para 1(a) seems the most likely refernce that the PP had in mind:

(1)A person is guilty of an offence if he—

(a)sends by means of a public electronic communications network a message or other matter that is grossly offensive or of an indecent, obscene or menacing character;

Icon closest to official UK Judge's outfit -->

0
0
Silver badge

Re: My policy is...

Does a one-to-one phone call where one individual or company calls a personal phone line count as a message on a public communications network?

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: My policy is...

"(a)sends by means of a public electronic communications network a message or other matter that is grossly offensive or of an indecent, obscene or menacing character;"

Oh .. so people calling asking you to vote for "X", which you find grossly offensive, are committing an offence?

[joke - i do know the difference between offensive and "grossly offensive" in law]

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: My policy is...

citation please - i dont doubt you at all, i would like the reference!

Section 127 of the Communications Act 2003 prohibits sending "a message or other matter that is grossly offensive". I'm sure it could be manhandled into being used to prosecute someone being quite sweary.

It runs the risk of being laughed out of court, mind you...

Vic.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Heh. Government "enforcement."

So ... as it is in virtually every enforcement case ... the government takes a small pittance from the "offender" (sorry, I deliberately misspelled donor) and nothing (or close to it) goes to those annoyed or harmed. The reason these guys are left to offend again is that if the government clamps down on them too hard then people will stop doing it and they won't collect as many fines. Like everyone else, the government is in it for profit... only without providing a service to anyone at all (even shitlords who send out spam calls are providing a useful service to shitlords who advertise through them).

We get the same thing in the US. Wells Fargo signs up over 2 million people for bogus products, and the government orders restitution of $5M (less than $2.50 per person)... and takes $185 million for themselves. Out in this area oil refineries spill out excess pollution and the state / federal governments keep the fines just at the point where it's considered a "cost of business," and the people whose health is affected don't even get $2.50. And this is under hardcore left-wing progressive governments in one of the bluest of blue states. A state that is so blue that the other side may as well not even show up to the legislature - the progressives have enough votes to pass literally anything they want and override any objections. So for the usual response that "we just need to get the right out of power"... guess what? Nope. The left sells out even faster and, frankly, with less shame.

And then politically you have one group that supports the scammy businesses and another group that idolizes the scammy government. Ugh.

1
0
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Heh. Government "enforcement."

Certainly you don't mean to imply that donating money to politicians can buy favorable treatment. Why, such a thing would be tantamount to bribery! How could that be made legal?

What? The same people who take the bribes make the laws?

Never mind.

8
0
Silver badge

Re: Heh. Government "enforcement."

Nah, the govt. aren't interested in the pittance of tax they get from these guys (unlike, say, tobacco industry).

It's more that they have a generic fear of bothering "business".

1
0
Silver badge

Re: Heh. Government "enforcement."

[...rant...] ...in the US... ...under hardcore left-wing progressive government...

lol

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Check point claims are doing well after their fine probably as another company as they are in liquidation.

Waste of time.

0
0
Silver badge
Devil

you've all missed the obvious case for enforcement

Put all the execs in a soundproof room and play their recordings non-stop all the way up to 11. Seriously.

8
0
Silver badge

hello? sorry?

" illegally harassed people with automated calls encouraging them to claim compensation for job-related hearing loss."

WHAT?

COMPULSION?

COMPOST?

2
0

They should also force the offender to disclose where they bought the data from, and the seller should also be prosecuted for selling it.

6
0
Silver badge

Can they now stop those scumbags

who call repeatedly offering

"National Window Replacement Scheme".

They ignore TPS and complaints to Ofcom seem to be ignored.

I'd put them in the stocks for a month and let people throw rotten food at them (and dog crap).

1
0

I bought some phones with call blocking/screening built in. Not had a single spam/scam call now in 6 months. I got some for my mum as she was getting half a dozen a day and now gets none.

Takes a few minutes to set up, and for new numbers it's a single press of either 1, 2 or 3 to allow screened call once, permanently or to deny/block entirely.

Peace and quite at last.

4
0
Silver badge

so what happens to

"The caller withheld their number"?

Like what about half the NHS Trusts do? All in the interests of Patient Confidentiality. WTF!

What about those who spoof genuine numbers? SS7 allows this.

There is no one panacea.

1
0

Re: so what happens to

The NHS one drives me nuts. The landline is unplugged due to spam. I disabled voicemail due to spam. I block unknown callers due to spam. I told my surgery until I'm blue in the face to release caller-id before they call (I know they can, a nurse did it once & ditto in a couple of other circumstances).

My theory is not patient confidentially, rather they haven't got a proper telephone setup. They don't "nat" through to a single phone number which comes back to the front desk. You call 'em back on that released number & you're straight back to the phone that called you. I think that's the real reason why.

1
0

Re: so what happens to

had a similar conversation with a (previous) GP practise manager. They had no caller ID as apparently they were being asked to pay BT more to have it enabled on their business lines ...

0
0

Does it work on spoofed numbers?

"I bought some phones with call blocking/screening built in. Not had a single spam/scam call now in 6 months. I got some for my mum as she was getting half a dozen a day and now gets none.

Takes a few minutes to set up, and for new numbers it's a single press of either 1, 2 or 3 to allow screened call once, permanently or to deny/block entirely."

In the States the spam calls can display on caller ID a number that is not the number they are calling from, i.e., spam call purporting to be from Police Department, or with proper number displayed, but not actually calling from that number. Does this blocking work on the actual number or the displayed number?

0
0

Re: so what happens to

The system has to transmit the caller ID from the source exchange to the destination exchange because that's essentially a packet-switched network. When it goes to analogue that necessity ends. Caller ID is the default, it's not making the number available to the destination that is special. You pay a little extra to receive it before you answer the phone, or you dial 1471 after the call.

Is he confusing the business line itself with a PBX that might be leased from BT?

0
0

Is that really a deterrent?

Ultimately, a poxy fine isn't going to deter companies like this.

Prison sentences for company directors - that might work

3
0
Anonymous Coward

>Media Tactics fell short of the mark when it treated consent as an administrative box-ticking exercise. Proper consent gives consumers control over how their information is used. The people targeted by Media Tactics were not given that control.

Isn't this kinda like the cookies that I have no option to decline every time I visit a site hosted in the goddamn EU? Can I start suing websites for tracking me when I haven't explicitly consented - since "you agree by continuing to browse" is even weaker than "you checked this box off"?

2
2
Silver badge
Megaphone

Political robocalls are standard here

How anyone imagines you will vote for a shower of shites who ring you with a recorded message TWICE EVERY evening, for weeks, is beyond me.

3
0
Silver badge

Scumbag corporation

I suggested that EL Reg institute a prize every year for outstanding scumabaggery ; These guys should be in there with a real chance.

Suggested prizes:

- Scumbag Steve hat.

- sieve for leakiest website

- tin of insecticide spray for buggiest software

- piece of string for insecurity in software. However, if Adobe is the winner, I believe straw would be more appropriate for strengthening mud-based constructions.

2
0

How to stop them

I was pestered by one firm trying to get me to claim damages for whiplash etc. I politely pointed out that the accident involved someone knocking off my wing mirror while I was about a mile away from the vehicle. They said they would remove my details from their list, over the next few months I got several calls every week for the same thing, one day I got 3 calls in the space of an hour. I finally shut them up by saying in a loud voice "I hope you and your children all get cancer" Not nice, but they have now stopped calling me.

0
0

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017