back to article Silicon Valley VCs: We're gonna make California great again – on its own

With protests against Donald Trump's US presidential election victory turning violent in California, a group of venture capitalists from Silicon Valley are funding an initiative to allow the Golden State to secede from the US. Dubbed Calexit, the movement has found a sponsor in Shervin Pishevar, MD at Sherpa Capital – an early …

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Well, Ivan 4 ...

... seeing as overall CA provides more to the rest of the US than it receives in return, I rather suspect that it wouldn't be too much of a problem.

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Anonymous Coward

Welcome to the new third world

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I thought that California was due to separate from the rest of the US anyway. RSN in geological terms, on its way to the subduction zone.

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Might want to learn a little geology, Doctor Syntax.

The Pacific plate isn't subducting under the continental plate, rather they are grinding past each other along a mostly north/south boundary called a "strike slip" fault. In fact, given enough time the LA/San Diego metroplex will become a suburb of the San Francisco Bay Area (not that we want them).

The subducting plate you are looking for was called the Farallon Plate, but that little bit of earthworks mostly finished a couple tens of million years ago. Remnants remain North of the Mendocino Triple Junction and South of the Rivera Triple Junction, but I assure you that none of California is returning from whence it came any time soon.

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Re: Might want to learn a little geology, Doctor Syntax.

Isn't California slowly swapping places with Japan?

And by slowly, I mean slowly in geological terms.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Might want to learn a little geology, Doctor Syntax.

"And by slowly, I mean slowly in geological terms."

Don't you mean "at normal pace" in geological terms?

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Re: Might want to learn a little geology, Doctor Syntax.

Possible confusion with the Cascadia subduction zone here on Doc's behalf?

Anyway, California's geology is a very interesting subject.

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Re: Might want to learn a little geology, Doctor Syntax.

IaS, the short answer is "no" ... at least not any more than England is swapping places with India.

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PRC

People's Republic of ...

C̶h̶i̶n̶a̶ ̶

C̶o̶r̶k̶

California

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Devil

Re: PRC

I think it's going to be DPRK - Democratic People's Republic of Kalifornia.

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Facepalm

I'm moving to Reno if we get Calexit...

Self-indulgent, whiny, university-educated drama queens who are lousy Americans.

If Hillary had won and Wyoming or South Carolina had suggested secession (v2.0 for South Carolina!), Hillary supporters would have been laughing at them. Plus when these high-paid dolts leave and take California's safe, blue-state status with them, they screw over their democrat friends remaining in the rest of the country. I guess its solidarity for me, but not for thee!

And no, I'm not a Trump supporter, but I do believe in our system.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: I'm moving to Reno if we get Calexit...

1: If Hillary had win, you wouldn't have a pervert president. There's a difference between getting someone you don't like, and someone who's not up for the job.

2: Anyone with an IQ over 80 ( although granted that excludes around half of the US electorate, and 52% of the British electorate ) would laugh at Wyoming or South Carolina seceeding; Wyoming is land-locked, and neither have the infrastructure, or economy to go it alone. Trump supporters would be laughing at Vermont or Minnesota going it alone, and Hillary supporters wouldn't be laughing at Texas proposing to go it alone.

3: Your system is what's screwed up here; The electoral college system of US voting means that the Republicans and Democrats have a Duopoly on who's going to be the President of the United States. If the US dropped it's backwards Electoral College system, and embraced Proportional Representation by Single Transferable Vote, people could vote for who they wanted to be President, and not just against the person they don't.

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Trollface

Re: I'm moving to Reno if we get Calexit...

Not clear on the definition of IQ are you there AC.

"When current IQ tests were developed, the median raw score of the norming sample is defined as IQ 100"

Granted, it may be possible as there are lots of Anglo-Saxon types in both countries.

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Re: I'm moving to Reno if we get Calexit...

I'd say LET THEM GO!!! Let the South go - let all the red states go and see what they can put together with their 19th century attitudes and leave the rest of us alone to live in the 21st century.

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Anonymous Coward

Sounds like those oaths of loyalty people make at citizenship ceremonies are meaningless repetitions for some who just want a short cut to a better life. Maybe they should quit the pretence and replace the ceremony with a blessing that may you all get filthy rich. Some disposable midwestern kid can be sent to risk their life overseas paving the way for future profiteering since the military is never used to actually defend America any more.

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Make California Grate again.

I've always found it grating.

If they did,how long would it take before the underclass struggling to afford homes burned out the aloof technocrats.

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California initiative

They just passed Proposition 64: Legal recreational weed.

Initiative? I don't think so.

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Devil

Re: California initiative

"Legal recreational weed."

yeah, the concept of 'revolution' will turn into a lava-lamp-lit room filled with a bunch of zombie-eyed dope smokers staring at the ceiling going "wow, there are patterns in the ceiling, man..."

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Re: patterns in the ceiling

But there *are* patterns in the ceiling, bro.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: California initiative

Are you sure you aren't confusing marijuana with LSD?

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Re: California initiative

The only thing Prop 64 changes is legality, and a new tax base. The stoners will remain stoners, and not a single one of the rest of us will take up the stinking habit.

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Agriculture

I'm pretty sure California is only agriculturally sufficient thanks to all the cheap (i.e. Federally subsidised) water they get from Arizona. How well do they think California's farmers would do if they had to pay market rates for all the water, while being in competition with California's cities.

What happens when all of the Military-Industrial-Complex corporates leave - Northrop, Lockheed, Boeing, BAE, L-3, General Atomics, not to mention NASA, US Marines/Army/Navy/Air Force/Coast Guard?

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Re: Agriculture

Water in California is a funny thing. The H2O we get from Arizona goes into the LA basin, to keep all those swimming pools full. On the other hand, we send our own water down into the desert to grow cotton and rice to feed & clothe the rest of the USofA. Without the rest of the US to feed and clothe, we can afford to lose the AZ water supply.

However, while we have plenty of water if we're not growing crops for everyone else, we'd have problems shifting it around to where it's needed without the hydroelectricity from Hoover.

(Note that I'm not pro or anti "Sovereign California" or "Yes California", or whatever it calls itself these days ... I just view the concept as an interesting "what if" mind game, and have done for about 50 years since I first heard about the idea.)

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Re: Agriculture

"What happens when all of the Military-Industrial-Complex corporates leave - Northrop, Lockheed, Boeing, BAE, L-3, General Atomics, not to mention NASA, US Marines/Army/Navy/Air Force/Coast Guard?"

What makes you think they'd leave?

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Re: Agriculture

An excellent, accurate, and essential observation.

The Colorado River water (that is, the water from Arizona) indeed goes into the swimming pools and lawns and carwashes of SoCal.

Meanwhile, the water for agricultural here in the Central Valley is from annual snow-runoff from the Sierra Nevada mountains. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, for more than a century, has diverted mountain rivers into artificial reservoirs to capture as much as possible in order to slake the thirst of the Central Valley's massive agriculture.

As for domestic water use here in the Central Valley, my municipality has doubled the price of water in the past two years. My front yard is brown. And so shall it stay. As for the pool, I bought the house not because of it, but in spite of it. Surprisingly, the pool demands much less water than a green lawn. And at least the pool means the rest of my backyard is concrete, not lawn turned brown.

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Re: Agriculture

I'm pretty sure California is only agriculturally sufficient thanks to all the cheap (i.e. Federally subsidised) water they get from Arizona. How well do they think California's farmers would do if they had to pay market rates for all the water, while being in competition with California's cities.

Kind of like NYC, then. The the big nasty stinkhole down there likes to head upstate and demand everyone run *their* lives just so NYC (which sits on the shores of an OCEAN, mind you) and sip tea in their posh sidewalk cafes on Park Avenue. Yeah, cut them off and let them run their own desalination plants instead.

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Thumb Down

Re: Agriculture

"How well do they think California's farmers would do if they had to pay market rates"

Errr, what? Rivers flow where they will. You don't have to buy water from an upstream country if the water flows on down to yours anyway.

Unless you think Arizona is planning some big dams and some rather large inland lakes.

Yeah, there might be problems with amount of flow and who uses which amount of water and that might cause some tensions, but still, the water will generally flow where ever the geology makes it go.

There are plenty of countries around the world who mange to live and use the water from rivers which originate in other countries, sometimes passing through more than one other country.

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Some Democrat!

As such, he thinks the state should go its own way because he doesn't like who has just been elected to the top job in the country.
Doesn't believe in democracy obviously!

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Californians out-of-touch with other Californians

This scheme *would* cause civil war-- *within* California.

California, culturally, is completely polarized.

The California one sees in the movies and on TV (that is, L.A. and S.F.) is a misrepresentation. Culturally, California is *not* a "blue" state.

The aforementioned schemes to split California into upwards of four states are grounded in the following: California is two big blue islands (again, L.A. and S.F, and for convenience I include Silicon Valley with S.F) in a sea of red. Sacramento is an atoll that is "blue". The rest is: San Diego and Orange county (both educational and economic powerhouses), a massive rural agricultural and petroleum output in the Great Central Valley (aka, San Joaquin Valley), isolated forests and mountains, and isolated coasts. In these latter areas, the folks may be few in number in contrast with the populations of the two aforementioned "blue" islands, but they are "red" staunch conservatives who couldn't be further culturally-alienated from the citizens of the two "blue" cities..

Indeed, these rural Californians would take up arms upon any serious attempt by California to secede.

I used to enjoy the stunned looks upon the faces of midwesterners arriving here in Central Valley: "This isn't what we've seen on the tube or in movies!?!"

But for a Californian, such as the sponsor of this secession initiative, to be so completely out-of-touch with his own state is not at all funny.

Sign me,

Lived and worked almost all over California for 36 years.

(and I happen to be "blue" in the sea of "red" that is the Central Valley-- so I just keep my mouth shut and shun bumper stickers on my car. Yes, I am a coward.)

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Devil

Re: Californians out-of-touch with other Californians

"This scheme *would* cause civil war-- *within* California."

and guess WHICH half owns MORE guns...

heh - time to pick up a rifle and start-a-shootin' - YEEE-HAAAAAHHHHH!!!!!

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Re: Californians out-of-touch with other Californians

The "divide" between the Red & Blue California isn't all that great. Rural needs to sell food, and urban knows they aren't equipped to produce their own. It's all a bug love-fest, actually.

Besides, we're united in our hatred for Sacramento politics.

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Re: Californians out-of-touch with other Californians

Your entire observation is absolutely correct .

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SMH

So these rioters wanted their guy elected, and now that they're not getting that, they're throwing a fit? And they want to tell me how to live my life? I'm no Trump fan, but the irony is thick!

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Anonymous Coward

Trump seems a bit thick.

He was moaning about not having CFC in his effing hairspray, because he was only going to use it indoors anyway!

How effing thick can a man be? Put him on some basic science classes for god's sake!

A intellectually lazy bullshitter with a talent for talking, and talking, and talking. Would fit right in as commie leader -or any kind of "never stops talking"-dictator.

I can't see him being very effective as prez.

Puppet POTUS with a Liberace hairdo.

And, BTW, if you know you are thick as a brick, DON'T EFFING VOTE!

You will only make things worse. Just abstain. OK?

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Trump seems a bit thick....And, BTW, if you know you are thick as a brick, DON'T EFFING VOTE!
As thick as you AC? You are supposedly living in a democracy. Yet I just saw on the TV news so-called Democrats calling for the deportation of their fellow citizens for not voting the way you wanted them to. Frankly, I find that disgusting.

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Anonymous Coward

I don't vote on matters I have no clue about.

It makes sense not to.

I do that voluntarily.

"Democrats calling for the deportation"

Huh? What does that have to do with me? Strawman, much?

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"How effing thick can a man be? Put him on some basic science classes for god's sake!"

To me, this seems to be one of the downsides of the US political system. An incoming President surrounds themselves with all of their own advisers and political appointees. So even as President, they don't really ever see the other side of the coin.

Is there anyone in the Whitehouse with actual clout who stays across administration changes?

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"And, BTW, if you know you are thick as a brick, DON'T EFFING VOTE!"

Just how many people do you think are thick enough not to vote but clever enough to realise it?

I suspect you didn't think this one through very well.

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Anonymous Coward

If you don't understand a thing, and therefore get enraged, when educated people talk, then you know you are thick.

If you get exited when someone shouts "get them out of the country", then you know you are thick.

I find yourself shouting and flailing with your arms when some orange baboon agitates from the podium, then you know you are thick.

Any one of these indicators is sufficient evidence.

Simples

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"Is there anyone in the Whitehouse with actual clout who stays across administration changes?"

The kitchen staff.

And before you scoff, watch My Fellow Americans.

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NO.

The thing about being thick is that you don't KNOW you're thick. That's why you're thick in the first place: nothing gets through to you, not even the idea that you're thick.

It's like with stupid: a self-reinforcing loop that's extremely difficult to get through. It usually takes a crisis to do it, and if even that doesn't work, odds are they won't be alive to realize it.

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Devil

That I would like to see...

Texas I could see leaving because well its The Lone Star and F@#k everyone, but California they'd have to leave their drum circle to go vote to start with.. But I would be happy to be proven wrong.

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Pint

"I thought when Texas joined there was some sort of written agreement that allowed the state to secede?"

Err, no.

"Or was it just to be able to break up into five smaller states?"

Yes, kind of.The resolution adding Texas as a US state does say that Texas can be split into as many as 4 additional states, with a comment that any split has to follow the US federal constitution. But that provision was just a meaningless marketing stunt added to impress the ignorant commoners in Texas. The US constitution has always permitted existing states to be split into multiple states if both that state and congress agree - and it has happened a few times (e.g. Maine, West Virginia). The provision didn't add any special new rights to Texas. But that meaningless provision has grown into a "Texas is so very special" myth perpetuated for 150 years by Texan ignorati.

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The point on states splitting with Congress' approval is the sticking point here - Texas' clause allows them to do so without.

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re: Texas

"The point on states splitting with Congress' approval is the sticking point here - Texas' clause allows them to do so without."

No, it does not. Maybe you should read the &%^$#% thing before commenting - even the educated in Texas understand that "under the provisions of the Federal Constitution" means that they have to follow the same process as any other state that wants to split into pieces. Stop perpetuating an ignorant myth.

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Anonymous Coward

So it may be.

Actually Texas is the only state that can cesede from the union. But on another note, California will suffer if the manage it. Though they are a maker energy producer they still have to import almost 23 percent of thier power. That will hurt them badly. Yes that have a decent agriculture base, but not enough to support the population. They would have to impose strict border laws or suffer hugely when people come flock to California to immigrate. Import taxes out the nose. We don't need any electronics because those can be imported elsewhere cheaper. Since they wish to be independent, they will be considered a foreign product and not domestic. So they can't climate made in the USA. They have the entertainment industry, some agriculture, electronics and wine. All things we can live without from them. They also have the one of the highest consumer bases. I want to see how free education and Healthcare work out in the Republic of California.

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Pirate

I'd like to see them rule the Internet

...when we server their backbone, including the Trans-Pacific cables.

Without internet advertising revenue, the People's Republic of New California will be an impoverished shithole like North Korea.

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Re: I'd like to see them rule the Internet

The states of Washington and Oregon will join California - and maybe Nevada too. I would wish they'd like to have Colorado as a nom-contiguous member and perhaps New Mexico too. That configuration would have a decent chance of surviving. Self sufficiency is not required, just the means to make enough money to be successful globally - you can trade for things you don't make/grow yourself.

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