back to article Empty your free 30GB OneDrive space today – before Microsoft deletes your files for you

Microsoft is cutting its free 15GB OneDrive cloud storage space down to 5GB, and eliminating the 15GB free camera roll for many users. Files will be deleted by Redmond until your account is under the free limit. Back in November, Microsoft announced it would no longer provide free unlimited storage for Office 365 users, …

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Re: Ransomware

As far as I know the Ramsomware can also encrypt your cloud files too especially if the local files are all set to sync.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Ransomware

Then wouldn't you be able to revert to a previous version with some of the providers? (e.g. Dropbox)

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N2

Just a new type of

Ransomware

You'd think that paying shit loads of cash for their orifice 365 would grant sufficient space to store your files, paticually as they are so friggin large.

Well, if this is the so called future, you can shove yer cloud where the sun don't shine.

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Re: Just a new type of

It does - this is the "free" OneDrive storage that comes with a free MS email account. If you've got Office 365 you get 1TB storage on OneDrive.

And if you saw the link, signed up and protested the change last year when it was mooted, you got offered Office 365 free for a year (complete with the 1TB storage). <smug> Which I did. </smug>

During that free year, I'll be pulling my data down onto my NAS, naturally. I'm not actually going to *pay* for cloud storage.

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Happy

Re: Just a new type of

But the cloud IS where the sun don't shine? :)

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Re: Just a new type of

Could have waited until this year and indeed at least as recently as last week though my friend. Same offer being provided, and the storage allowances have remained as they were until now, so your free year would only just be starting. Which would be more smug.

The smuggest people don't use Office 365 to start with.

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It is a corporate problem.

Some high ranking member , speaks to a "new hire" who just wants some new shit on his CV for the next position they move too.

Thinks the 'old timers ' are past it and not uptodate with technology, and shit like this keeps happening.

I'm all for hot shit that can help running a business, but where does the risk analysis begin?

Clearly with the new hire who just pays lip service.

What happens to all these 'services' when governments change or companies go bust?

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Meh

mega.nz

50GB for free (or until they change their mind)

AND it's encrypted there and in transit.

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Re: mega.nz

Uh... yeah...and it'll keep your data safe, secure, and forever. I was born at night, but not last night.

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Re: mega.nz

"50GB for free (or until they change their mind)"

Great, and it's never failed before either.

No wait.

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Re: mega.nz

Actually I give them the same trust that I give Microsoft and even more than I pus on Google but it's 50GB vs 15GB and a cleaner sync client that doens't go deep you throat analyzing your content and offering brainded proto-applications (Google Docs) to view or edit. So I'm with Mega but only for convenient short time/ephemeral storage or transfer.

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Re: mega.nz

Blu Ray storage is cheaper. About 40 cents per 25GB - one time fee.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: mega.nz

I only have 1 TB of data, not much I know but some of it started out on an MFM drive 25 years ago and made it this far; it's all I felt I needed to keep along the way.

Only around 40GB of it is what I would consider important.

Out of that, only around 500MB it really, really important.

The rest is stuff like films and music that I would be disappointed to lose but not the end of the world.

So, I have a 2TB drive in my desktop, which is mirrored to my laptop drive, for convenience more than anything. The same data is mirrored to our server.

The important stuff is stored in a Veracrypt volume which goes to Mega - the VC volume is unmounted by a script and split into 50 MB files which means 9 times out of 10 only one or two files need to be re-uploaded after a change.

The really important stuff gets encrypted, split to 50 MB files and stored in Dropbox as well as Mega.

That may or may not be your cup of tea, and I'm sure someone will see a problem with my way of doing it, but my point is that one cloud vs. another, or HDDs vs, Blu-Ray vs. punched card is pointless. I believe distributed storage is the only way.

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Let's be reasonable

Some years ago a mate in IT responded to my loss of data with a "[Preach mode on] Always keep a backup...blah blah blah [Preach mode off]" speech which stands the test of time. It really could not be simpler. Cloud is another form of backup for which purpose it has a number of advantages. Disadvantages? Sure, but nuffink's perfeck. Problem is average user does not know,, does not think, is not told and will not set up a home NAS even if he knows he should - Now there's a thought to save the drive manufacturers if every home comes with running water and NAS. Won't happen.

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Re: Cloud is another form of backup

Stop right there : Cloud is not backup.

Not when the providers can authorize themselves to delete your files without your permission.

A backup is supposed to be reliable : the Cloud is not. At this point in time, there is not a single cloud storage provider that can be trusted to not lose your files, delete your files or not hand your files to any TLA that mentions your name in passing.

Yes, the Cloud could be a perfect backup service, but relying on it today is just putting your data on a straw rowboat and hoping it won't sink before you need it.

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A few bad apples

"The changes in OneDrive were necessary, Microsoft claimed, because a few bad apples were abusing the system and storing vast amounts of data in their cloud. "

It it is "a few bad apples" that are causing the issue, punish them. What this suggests, M$, is that you really didn't scope out the cost/value of your offering before you offered it. If I am paying for a certain amount I should be entitled to continue paying for that amount at the "contracted" rate. If I am a new customer I get the offerings available when I start my service.

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Re: A few bad apples

"If I am paying for a certain amount I should be entitled to continue paying for that amount at the "contracted" rate."

And as the saying goes: "Good luck with that".

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Re: A few bad apples

"I should be entitled to continue paying for that amount at the "contracted" rate"

Yes, you should, but you don't actually have a "contract". What you have is Ts & Cs that can be changed anytime by the provider, in other words, you've got an empty promise.

A contract is a binding agreement between two parties, agreement that cannot be changed without the consent of both parties. It was decided, somewhere at the beginning of the IT industry, that this model did not correspond to the Internet, and now here we are : companies are all-powerful, can change offers at a whim, and the only thing you can do is lose and go somewhere else if you don't accept the new terms.

One of these days, Joe Public is going to have to wake up and realize that he's being taken for a fool. That day, somebody might think of doing away with the EULA nonsense and Ts & Cs that only the paying customer cannot change. That day, the law will once again enforce the proper idea of "contract".

In the mean time, bend over and try to enjoy it, because that's the choice we have.

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Re: A few bad apples

' If I am paying for a certain amount I should be entitled to continue paying for that amount at the "contracted" rate.'

A couple of problems with that. First, if it's free then you're not paying and it's doubtful whether there's a contract at all. Secondly, remember the old saying: if it's free it's worth every penny you paid for it.

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Re: A few bad apples

First, if it's free then you're not the customer.

There - FTFY

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Problems with OneDrive run much deeper than the bait and switch marketing

Windows 10 seems particularly badly affected:

http://www.deltics.co.nz/blog/posts/2449

(Full disclosure: That's a post on my own blog, but easier to link to it than to re-produce the details here).

Bottom line: Windows 10 + OneDrive = recipe for deleted files, no matter how much storage you are officially signed up for/entitled to.

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WTF?

Re: Problems with OneDrive run much deeper than the bait and switch marketing

Christ on a bendy bus, that's absolutely fucking ridiculous

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Facepalm

Re: Problems with OneDrive run much deeper than the bait and switch marketing

As Sorry that handle is already taken says, that's utterly ridiculous.

However, my guess (bearing in mind I only read it very quickly) is that the sync from Windows 10 is doing exactly what it thinks it should. It's not that it's deleting difficult files, but a case of it "synchronising" the remote storage with the local storage: Making sure the remote location contains the same files by deleting those that aren't local. i.e. the perfect example of a SNAFU.

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Facepalm

Re: Problems with OneDrive run much deeper than the bait and switch marketing

I might try the Windows 10 method* of deleting OneDrive files.

I delete them manually from OneDrive but then find the WinPhone has put them back. I then delete them from the WinPhone and find OneDrive has put them back. I don't use either enough to worry about this but it's a bit of an 'oh no, not again' moment when deleted picture come back from the dead.

*Actually I can't. My old MSI motherboard desktop has a Creative Audigy card in it and between them they crash the Win10 install process. (A really nasty HDD sector ruining crash. Well that's who I'm blaming for the outbreak of bad sectors.)

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Stop

Well this is the way of MS - just think to the future

Well this is the way of MS - Think of Win 10 - ROFL

To continue to access abc - $$$

To continue to use xyz - $$$

To login to Win 10 - $$$

ROFL

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Re: Well this is the way of MS - just think to the future

Exactly, the Windows subscription model has taken another step forward.

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Dropbox

I use Dropbox myself, mainly because it integrates with my Android phone, my Linux computers and my Windows computers. I have 50GB of space available for free, of which, I have used about 2GB.

What do I use it for? --> It's real handy when I need to copy a file from one computer to another. I have some music on there as well, that I can share amongst my computer.

Do I store important files on there --> Hell no, I have an external drive that I use for keeping important files and doing backups to.

Would I be upset if Dropbox were to suddenly disappear? --> No, I do not keep anything of important on there, and what is there, is also saved elsewhere.

To keep it on the topic of OneDrive, the OneDrive main page says it connects all your devices, but then does not give any info on how to integrate it into a Linux system.

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follow the numbers...

75tb / 14000 is just over 5gigs avg.

bullshit it was problem users... they just needed to find the amount most people would need/use and then give away slightly less.

i'm one of the few that clicked to keep my 15gig... not that it really matters, i'm moving away from my M$ ecosystem.

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Ahem

They are making usb drives with, get this 128gb these days...

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Anonymous Coward

Hey Microsoft

I feel bad about this. I bought a Lumia 1020 and part of the deal was 30gb of camera roll space on OneDrive (SkyDrive at the time). We concluded that deal years ago and now here you are cutting my storage. I feel like you came round my house and ripped out the memory from my phone. I hope you enjoy the 25gb you got off me. And yeah I backed up, but OneDrive use is closely integrated into the 1020 to the point I can't remove the app. And last time I looked, the page advertising the 1020 still said it comes with 30gb of OneDrive storage.

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Re: Hey Microsoft

part of the deal was 30gb of camera roll space on OneDrive

Probably too late now but you could apply to keep a certain amount of space that was being reclaimed (can't recall the details), but I'm keeping 25GBs plus photo roll (I think). Maybe look into it.

As for a 'few bad apples', absolute tosh, don't offer unlimited storage space, it's obvious some people are going to abuse the offer, it's fucking human nature! 15GB free storage space is astoundingly generous anyway and I doubt anyone would complain if that was bundled with O365.

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Anonymous Coward

Here we go again

People moaning about something they get for free. Not happy, ask for your money back

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Here we go again

True, but to the general population without the cynical, untrusting, megamind el-reg commentard experience of real world this is a real problem.

Most people I speak to really have no idea where their data/cat pictures/inappropriate selfies or in the case of office365 the important letters from school/lawyer/employer etc are stored and are surprised that they have nothing left when they upgrade their phone or PC, let alone what gets to someone's cloud storage.

Also setting up a home NAS with Wi-Fi auto sync is not always straightforward for these people to set up.

Cloud is just vapour and that's where the important stuff stays nowadays, and even paid ones can be just as bad...

Old school methods still work but they need knowledge people don't have and younger people are encouraged to ignore by tech pushers...

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Thumb Down

Re: Here we go again

A promise is a promise. That fact that the price was zero does not change the fact that people were promised something, got used to using it in the given parameters, and now are being deprived of the usage they were promised.

Boiling it down to a "free" thingy change is you missing the point.

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Re: Here we go again

There is free, as in free beer, and free as in bundled in at no extra charge.

When I bought my big telly, it came with a free extended warranty. It was one the of the reasons I bought that particular model of TV from a particular dealer. If, after say six months, the dealer came back and told me that the free extended warranty was not going to be honoured and I should just suck it up and stop whinging because it was free, then I think I would have a legitimate complaint. I wouldn't have bought that telly in the first place.

The only good thing is that people are learning the value of Mircosoft's promises. As my transatlantic friends would say, " that, and a dollar will get you a cup of coffee."

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Anonymous Coward

The Cloud...

Other people's computers you have no control over

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Re: The Cloud...

I attended an Executive Committee meeting a few years ago and certain chaps were getting excited about The Cloud and how it was going to save us £gazillions and was like, totally cool, man. I asked someone to offer a description of what he cloud was. Stalling. I was asked for mine. I replied "someone else's servers" and the Risk and Compliance got all silent and sniffy and we retained our well-run, beautifully managed racks etc. because they were, in fact, cheap and secure. This was an investment bank.

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Headmaster

Re: The Cloud...

Going for your definition. The control is purely contractual, and subject to the feasibility of the link, and capacity of the provider. But there are Works and Tasks that need this kind of Service.

A lot annoyed of 'Propaganda' presenting 'Cloud' as a kind of panacea.

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Windows

Re: The Cloud...

"Someone else's servers" have been contracted from the Internet beginning. The only sound idea behind it is the professionalization of the Service. This MS 'frog jumping' on conditions of Service is far from professional, indeed.

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Owncloud

I use OwnCloud precisely because I don’t trust any of the others to (a) keep my data intact, (b) keep my data secure and (c) keep their promises.

I know that involves running a (Linux) server at my home office, but that is a lot less of a headache than losing your data or being beholden to a third party who keeps changing the rules.

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Re: Owncloud

If you have likeminded friends or relatives, you can have cloudy personal storage in each others homes to give geographical separation.

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Re: Owncloud

That is just what I have done. I chose Plusnet as my ISP for FTTC because they gave me good upload speed (20Mbit/s upload and 40Mbit/s download) which made fast bothway data transfer feasible. Now Plusnet are "improving" my service by halving my upload speed.

The lesson for me is that if you don't get shafted by your Cloud provider, then it'll be your network provider that does it. Either way you get shafted.

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Typical Microdick

Bait, switch, abandon, yet people still defend and use them.

You can't fix that kind of stupid.

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Glad I don't keep all my eggs in one basket. I am an Office 365 subscriber with a Tb of OneDrive storage but, after losing some old and irreplaceable photos a couple of years ago, I am paranoid about storage now.

So I use my 1 Tb OneDrive but I also use my 1Tb of Amazon cloud storage and 1Tb of Dropbox storage to hold duplicates of photos and documents. Just for safety I also keep a 1Tb external HDD with me which also has a duplicate of this data.

If all that fails then I figure I've bigger things to worry about than a few lost photos.

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Paris Hilton

Bait and switch

I'm sure there are laws about that kind of thing...?

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The family snaps, gone in a flash.

I have photos of my ancestors, taken in the very early years of the 20th century. Looking at them, some faded and dog eared but entirely usable, I have wondered what will happen to family shots taken today. Stored not in shoeboxes or albums but on hard drives, optical discs and USB sticks which will surely fail or become incompatible with future hardware.

Now we have the cloud and our heritage may be in the hands of greedy idiot philistines like Microsoft -- either to be deleted at will or held for ransom.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The family snaps, gone in a flash.

And when you pass on - no one will know passwords or how to retrieve images in old formats from legacy cloud services. all these images and no history...

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Happy

Re: The family snaps, gone in a flash.

> I have wondered what will happen to family shots taken today. Stored not in shoeboxes or albums but on hard drives, optical discs and USB sticks which will surely fail or become incompatible with future hardware.

Select the best ones, print them out, and put them in an album. I don't even bother with owning a photo quality printer: it's easier to use a local print shop. You can then write names, places and dates on the back so that future viewers will have some context as well.

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Re: The family snaps, gone in a flash.

Another good thing about using a professional print shop is that it's more likely the photos won't fade too badly. Modern domestic photoprinters may be better, but qutie a few of my older (3-5 years) home-printed photos are looking a bit rubbish compared to 20-year-old film-based snaps.

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Windows

Re: The family snaps, gone in a flash.

All my old color photos now 'washed' and dim. But not my old 640x480 HP Photosmart shots printed on Epson 'pigment' inks.

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