back to article Why Microsoft's .NET Core is the future of its development platform

It is just over a year since Microsoft announced the open sourcing of .NET Core, a cross-platform fork of the Windows-only .NET Framework. The .NET Framework is not going away, but it is now apparent that the company's focus is on .NET Core as the future of its development platform. Microsoft's .NET Framework goes back a long …

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Re: How many times have we gone through this?

Joerg.

Ha REAL PROGRMERS input their code directly into the front panel of the mainframe.

Get back into your box you bloody quiche eater.

:)

Ps. Using high level languages does not make us not real programmers.. Many people can do everything you mention but choose high level languages because as has been pointed out optimisation isn't the be all and end all... Alot of people want quick development and maintainable code so they can get deliverables out on time.

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Re: How many times have we gone through this?

Real programmers solve problems, not piss about with technology.

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Re: How many times have we gone through this?

I wore out one of the rotary switches on our IBM 360 from doing console debugging... First thing in the morning I used to depress the Lamp Test switch just to make certain that none of the address or data indicators wasn't burnt out.

Hexadecimal forever!

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.NET Core is not yet ready for prime time

We did an analysis of our product to see whether it would run on .NET Core, using the available ApiPort tool: http://jnbridge.com/blog/why-we-cannot-yet-support-net-core. We weren't surprised that our own stuff wouldn't yet work on .NET Core (as the article says, migrating existing .NET applications to .NET Core is likely to be difficult, if not impossible), but looking at the unsupported APIs, I'd be surprised if many non-trivial, enterprise applications could be created for the new platform. We can only hope that will change, and the number of missing APIs will go down over time, but that remains to be seen.

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Re: .NET Core is not yet ready for prime time

I suspect that Dotnet Core will never replace the full (legacy?) Dotnet. It may get used in some cloud deployments that were written from scratch to use it, but most of the existing business applications will either have existing dependencies (often through third party code) that require the full version, or the application developers won't be willing to foreclose the option in future versions of using stuff that requires the full version, and so will say the Dotnet Core is "not supported", even if it does work.

I think the main thing that Microsoft is looking for is to have a cut down Dotnet running on Ubuntu, Centos, etc., that they can use as a low priced option for specific workloads on MS Azure to compete with Amazon on price.

I'm not sure how well this will work. Mono was a huge flop on Linux servers, with there being little to no interest in C# or Mono amongst Linux/BSD developers, aside from some demo projects (now largely abandoned). I can't see why this would be any different for Dotnet Core.

On Linux, there is a Java community who do everything in Java and there is a "native" Linux community who do everything in Python, Ruby, NodeJS, Go, C++, Rust, etc. The Java community use Linux, but they largely sit in their own isolated Java world. They will still go on using Java until the Sun expands to engulf the earth. The "native" Linux community by and large have zero interest in either Java or C#. They are not going to start using either.

So for who will want to use Dotnet Core, that basically leaves traditional Microsoft developers who want to start dipping their toes into the open source world, or who are looking to shave some of the cost off off cloud hosting costs. In other words, it can be looked at as giving Microsoft a lower tier offering for price sensitive markets that they can use to try to persuade developers to stay with them by offering development tools that are at least someone familiar to them.

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Re: .NET Core is not yet ready for prime time

>it can be looked at as giving Microsoft a lower tier offering for price sensitive markets that they can use to try to persuade developers to stay with them

+1. This is not going to attract non-MS devs.

Has anyone ever noticed that most "appliances" run linux? Linux solves two things: proprietary licensing becomes commercially quite easy and cheap as long as your product isn't modifying GPL code; and the appliance vendor can control the platform. Not having someone else own part of your stack is important. Did you see what happened to Novell? Did you see what happened between Stonesoft and Check Point? Do you see Apple's attitude to anything which is similar to their own stuff? Remember Windows' support of HPFS?

The aggressive pursuit of profit means no-one trusts their suppliers and partners not to compete with them. What happens to .net core when it becomes so successful on linux that it starts making a significant impact on Windows sales? Ah yes, the libraries start to slip out of sync, suddenly things start to get a little easier on Windows than other platforms. Windows gets a few "released first" features and as a .net dev, you have the choice of a second rate platform or specifying Windows as the deployment platform.

Linux isn't just about being a different OS, its a different approach to IT. The open-source is not just a development and support model, its about people with common problems helping each other. That's a world away from MS' business practises. If you just replace "Windows" with "Linux" but the business model remains the same, you probably aren't going to gain the benefit you'd hoped for.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: .NET Core is not yet ready for prime time

Exactly. Linux isn't popular just because of it's technical superiority. This is something that Microsoft will never understand, let alone become.

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A Little Late to the Party

.Net Core seems to be a little late by about 10 years. My navel, not always accurate, leans towards writing code that with minimal effort is inherently cross platform. Slurp is about making everyone do it the Winblows way not necessarily the most competent or standards compliant way.

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Re: A Little Late to the Party

Wait, hold on. I think I'm getting getting it - "Slurp" is "Microslurp" right? Instead of Microsoft?

OH MY FUCKING GOD THAT'S HILARIOUS YOU ARE SO CLEVER

And "Winblows" is like "Windows" but you call it that because, right, it "blows"?

YOU ARE A GENIUS!

Oh wait, not genius. Cretin. That was it.

Grow the fuck up.

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Windows

Re: A Little Late to the Party

Drinking and posting again?

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Re: A Little Late to the Party

Just bored with the name calling. It's pathetic.

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Embrace, Extend, Extinguish

That's one of the standard strategies used by Microsoft. They already did that with the web, now they try to do that with the rest of computing.

Here the strategy is clear, they want to have more .net people working under Linux. Those people usually have the C++/C#/Java mindset which, which has been criticised extensively in many places. In short it leads to projects having lots of code, which take lots of developer resources to develop and lots of resources to maintain. This is why, while you can develop a simple unix flavoured operating system in less than a man year, C++/C#/Java projects typically take large teams and just go on and on for ever.

This is in a way very dangerous of the free software community. While it can currently afford to sustain projects with entities like the Mozilla Foundation, nobody knows what the future will be. Without a large (non profit) company like Mozilla, projects like Firefox would probably quickly disappear as you need large teams to maintain them. In contrast, the BSD people show that it's possible to develop and maintain a whole operating system with just a hand full of people.

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I don't see a problem with this

Of course, will I spend mindshare on it? Probably not (maybe buy the "in Action" book, which will then rot behind a stack of old Avril Lavigne CDs, but I digress) . I'm currently at the state where I begin to retch whenever I hear the "this is the next big thing, invest in this" anthem rise its discordant tones as frankly practically nothing currently "in production" is working particularly well or even at all. But F# is nice.

It is open source though, so it is always possible that the community may come up with GUI frameworks.

How open is this? Is it Open or open?

And would your trust a guy in a GAP hoody? Reeeally???

Now, you will excuse me, I'm trying to compile the XSB compiler here.

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Maybe too little too late

I applaud Microsoft's efforts to be more relevant by making their development software more appealing for the Cloud Computing/Containerization, Big Data Analytics, Mobile applications and Data Center operations, all areas where Linux and Apple in Mobile completely dominate at this time.

However .Net Core provides only a small and limited benefit to those who demand robust and truly complete “cross platform” development solutions, since the environment dtill depands to a substantial on Microsoft only applications like SQL Server, Sharepoint middleware, Hyper-V and other software that do not competently or adequately support Docker Containerization or platform agnostic Virtualization stacks that work more intuitively and adhesively together.

Unless and Until Microsoft's .Net core can compete effectively with Eclipse, Python, QT based and other robust, powerful and especially more secure and complete nulti-platform development ecosystems, Microsoft will only and continually play catchup.

Already Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) based Cloud Computing of Amazon AWS and various Openstack based services comprise combined 73 plus % sales versus about 12% for Microsoft Azure, and the Mobile scene is even more dispersed with Microsoft holding about 5% sales versus more than 93% for Apple iOS and Android/ChromeOS combined, and continues to grow.

Why would any level headed development project now base their effort on faultering technology base?

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AMD recently dropped .NET

AMD used to use .NET for their Catalyst drivers (ie. full desktop app). They've now switched to Qt, gone from 8 second application start-up to 0.6 seconds, with the added bonus of now being fully cross-platform, even on the desktop. It's not hard to see why they made the switch, and .NET Core won't be of any help.

There are better alternatives to .NET, even if your only platform is Windows.

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Look at the way those slobs are dressed. Gives one an idea of their audience.

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it will take 10 years to optimize the framework so programs run as fast as c++ and file size are 3 times smaller before anyone cares

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Anonymous Coward

The Future Of Dot Net Core

Microsoft .NET as a platform which has an open source component and is an evolving platform. Not only .NET Core is an open source, but also managed by a well-managed body namely, the .NET Foundation. In short, future of.Net is really bright. To know more, keep reading.

The future of .NET Core is also very bright and exciting. Many people and organizations are getting involved in.NET Core.

This is a cross-platform, fast, lightweight, updated, open-source framework for developing mobile, Web, and Windows applications and services that can be deployed and run on Windows, Linux and Mac operating systems.

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