back to article This THREESOME is a HANDFUL: It’s the Asus Transformer Book Trio

No matter what sort of tablet you prefer, be it an iPad or an Android slate, there will be times when you will also need a good old-fashioned Windows laptop too. Asus, which has form when it comes to cooking up strange combo designs - witness the PadFone - obviously thinks that’s the case as the new Transformer Book Trio is both …

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Anonymous Coward

Poor phrasing

" there will be times when you will also need a good old-fashioned Windows laptop too "

No Alun, there won't be, if my experience from the last 19 years is anything to go by.

I've nothing against Windows or any other platform, but your statement is incorrect.

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WTF?

How much?

So they took a bog standard £500 laptop and put in it:

An Intel Atom (why Android x86? Did they get CPUs on BOGOF from Intel or something?). Equivalent ARM SoC would be say $20.

2GB RAM: $15

16GB flash: $15

Battery 19Wh: $30

A dock connector: $5

And want to charge £900 for the privilege?

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Re: How much?

>And want to charge £900 for the privilege?

Some years ago I formulated Harvey's Law. From about 1975 to about 2000 any desirable computer cost just about a thousand quid, because that was how much the chap in the shop needed to take off people to make enough profit to pay the rent and rates.

Then we had the laptop-price-crash and people were buying machines for £350. The trade doesn't make enough money like that, they needed to take a grand off folk, hence the rise of things like this and ultrabooks (which are only slightly better than a netbook, for four times the price).

It ain't the components. It's the rest of the business that costs the money!

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I have one

I picked one up from John Lewis when they first came out.

Am not sure about the Windows vs. Linux debate.... Anyhoo, I must agree with most of the comments from the original review: Lack of backlit keyboard is a bit of a pain, it is rather heavy and yes it is trying to do lots of different things and not all of them entirely successfully.

For me: First and foremost I wanted something to replace a bulky desktop and to connect to an existing monitor. I also wanted an occasional laptop and the use of a large screen Android tablet. So, in my order of priority the Trio works well. More often than not the tablet / screen is disconnected, and only occasionally used just as a separate Android tablet, although Android does actually take longer to fully boot than Windows 8 with an SSD. The Android / Windows integration has been much lauded, but I must confess that I have not even tried that; I can save shared files with Microsoft or Dropbox, and I don't have a huge list of websites to share.

However, it could really do with an SD card slot and despite the 2x USB3 ports, docking stations are still a bit light on the ground (none available with SD, why not?!). There is a slight whine from the fan when it has been run for a while but not that bad, hopefully it doesn't get worse over time. Also, there can be issues with OS switch / screen drivers, hence why I have resisted Windows 8.1. With this being such a niche product I wouldn't be surprised to have to wait a long time for them.

I had actually been holding out for the Thinkpad Yoga, but I think the screen would have just got in the way when it came to using it with the external monitor. Yes, I know £900 is a bit spicy but it's still cheaper than the Thinkpad Yoga and for what I want I'm am very happy with my purchase.

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Anonymous Coward

Owning an Android Transformer and occasionally using an old Acer Aspire One netbook, this looks like it could be an ideal living room machine.

Connect to TV when needed, the tablet is still usable.

Use as laptop when needed.

My only concern is that the 'switch' looks bolted on, it reminds me a bit of an Amstrad MegaPC which was a 386 PC with a Megadrive bolted on, rather than sharing.

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I remember that old Amstrad mash-up well. It worked well if your use case was "PC = Office, Sega 16 bit = games", and even supported the CD through a funky adapter cable. The 386 was getting a bit old by then though, if your intention was to maybe try PC gaming too. Plus I don't think it had a VESA slot for local-bus graphics. I think some review mags were a bit upset that you couldn't use it as a console dev platform (as if) and that it was, in the words of one magazine, "a Megadrive, a PC, and a roll of sellotape."

And IIRC, the only 486 option was an SLC. Eurgh.

Still, it did what it did well enough, and the PC half of things stayed awake while you were playing. Plus playing console games on a monitor was a massive upgrade to the usual RF lead, composite video or big block o' SCART.

And yep, it's the first thing I thought of after reading the review for this thing.

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FAIL

Windows FAIL

It's not the "best of both worlds." It's the perfect tablet ruined by the presence of the Hitler-like abomination called Microsoft Windows. Asus Transformer is totally awesome with Android and ONLY Android. How dare they ruin it with Windows, the operating system that slaughters kittens and children while crashing all day long.

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