back to article Google's Project Glass headman answers most pressing question: 'Why?'

The creator of Google Glass sees his baby as being nothing less than the next step in human communications and humanity's "quest for knowledge." "There are two main drivers for why we wanted to make Google Glass," Babak Parviz, who founded and heads up Project Glass at Google, told his audience at the Hot Chips conference this …

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "It sees the world and can eventually smell the world."

When phones transmit smells, I am definitely going to turn that feature off.

I don't think you need bother - some of the curries I've had will probably short circuit the thing and any device receiving that data stream. It's a classic Denial of Smell (DoS) attack.

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Hmm

No. I really think that we will get good and working speech recognition and halfway clever pseudo-AIs first and THIS will be everywhere. So you can just talk to the thin air at home or at work and get answers and get things done. The Moto X is a start for that, at least as far as the hardware is concerned.

Wearing such a device on your nose will never become something you (or at least most people) would be willing to do all day and everywhere. At least I doubt that very much.

I think Google basically is in a very good position to move away from displays and keyboards, they have all the data anyway - they have just not yet figured out how to make their ads work with anything else...

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Anonymous Coward

I don't know whether Google Glass will succeed

Still, it could be interesting to re-read these comments 10 years from now.

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Anonymous Coward

this will fundamentally change the meaning of knowing things

Not sure about anyone else but that scares the shit out of me.

Lets rewrite history

Lets make anything you can use that is anti-capitalism (make your own soap, stupid stuff like that) disappears.

Remove libraries

What will we be left with? Idiocracy?

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Anonymous Coward

They were lucky he was so forthcoming, if it had been me, and they'd asked "Why?" I'd have just asked "Why not?"

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Coat

"Now if I want to know, say, the capital of Nigeria,"

If I want to know the capital of Nigeria I just check my spam folder.

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Re: "Now if I want to know, say, the capital of Nigeria,"

The capital of Nigeria is Abuja.

I gained this information through a special offline process known as "learning". No subscription required!

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"If we ever get there," he said of Project Glass' quest for instant answers, "this will fundamentally change the meaning of knowing things."

He's confusing information with knowledge

Knowledge requires experience to give information meaning

This is why we increasingly live in a reactive, not a predictive society

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Multi-tasking

When I'm walking, I'm relying on my eyesight not to bump into stuff. Audible info would be more useful than visual. Google Lug'ole might tempt me but Glass won't

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Silver badge

Re: Multi-tasking

I'm still waiting to see if Google will acknowledge any of the research done on human ability to multi-task.

The general consensus is that yes it can be done but definitely more than two things will begin to clog the cognition pathways causing a slow down in function and forgetting priorities.

So bumping into things is likely, witness smartphone users, game players and texters in the street stepping into traffic and nutting lamp-posts.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Multi-tasking

You know it's not in your eye-line right?

Like most comments here, they are all written by people that don't know anything about Google Glass, other than what Apple told them about it.

Why not treat it with an open mind, and look at the hundreds of interesting possibilities it can offer up.

A while back a HUD that would give you useful information was a dream for anyone other than a fighter pilot, and now it's going to be a $199 reality.

I don't think it will be something you wear all the time, but more something that you wear in certain situations, where electronic overlays of additional information ADDS to the experience.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Multi-tasking

Actually Google Glass would solve those issues. Those users are looking DOWN at their smartphones, and not having information presented to them at the edge of their field of view.

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Re: Multi-tasking

If it's not in my eyeline, how do I read it? If I'm reading it, it's in my eyeline. Google didn't invent virtual display glasses you know

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Evolution

From the Post Office, to the phone box, to the phone at home and work, to the computer in your pocket, to the computer on your head - to the computer in your head? It has to happen.

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Dubious value proposition?

Has anyone asked Mr. Glass why "one or many viewers" would want to "experience [your] life AT THIS VERY MOMENT" [emphasis mine - TFMR] rather than living their own?

I can see that having a hands-free camera aligned with your eyes may help you shoot a video when you are in Venice. I see absolutely no value in pinging your mates and streaming it to them in real time - I am sure they'll appreciate a little editing (unlike with a video camera that you need to hold and point, I expect you to move your head more freely) and the comfort of watching it at their convenience, even (horror!) at the expense of a bit of a delay. So, the camera may be useful, but not for the stated reason.

It is occasionally useful to share images in real time ("Is this the exact thing you wanted, darling?" sent to your attractive half who is not in the shop and even not in the same country), but we do it with our phones well enough, and "occasionally" means you don't need to keep the stupid thing on your nose.

I can think of two use cases for live, unedited video streaming from your glasses: (a) a SAS commando streaming what he sees to HQ; (b) a bunch of kids around town scouting pubs with the largest number of pretty girls / handsome men and sharing video info to vote on the venue for the night. I don't even know if case (b) will be popular or what the "subjects" will think of the geeks with Glasses snooping around.

I assume concert venues and such will cavity-search for Glasses to avoid 50 people "attending" the concert virtually for the price of one ticket, so we can discount that. Besides, the nearest mast will surely be overloaded by 10K streams (out of 50K attendees).

When we move away from live communication, how often does one need to look something up or obtain additional info? Certainly there is no need for the "enabling device" to be perched on your nose all the time for those purposes. Pull the device out of your pocket/purse when needed. Getting the answer a few seconds faster is not compelling (and how will the Glass eliminate the need to check multiple sources?). Combined with the inevitably more limited interface (and likely more intrusive and less private to boot: how do you search for something, by saying it out loud? [*]) than even your phone, what's the win?

[*] I have never observed anyone searching for stuff using voice interface - on Android or Apple - beyond a first demo to mates ( a few years ago) accompanied by chuckles.

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Re: Dubious value proposition?

It is occasionally useful to share images in real time ... but we do it with our phones well enough, and "occasionally" means you don't need to keep the stupid thing on your nose." - yes, but it would be much easier to show someone something just by looking at it rather than waving your phone at it, plus it's hands free, and if there were a number of things you wanted to check, you could pop your glasses on for 10 minutes, do what you need to do and then take them off, much like the way you'd use a phone/tablet at the moment.

I think they have the potential to become very useful. Maybe not something you'd wear all the time (although some probably would!), just something you put on for a specific task.

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CBN

Re: Dubious value proposition?

"Has anyone asked Mr. Glass why "one or many viewers" would want to "experience [your] life AT THIS VERY MOMENT" [emphasis mine - TFMR] rather than living their own?"

Oh dear. Most of you are so blind - and as others have said before, for a nerd, techie readership it really is sad.

I'm no great fan of Glass, but this is the future. As for why would anyone want to experience someone elses life rather than living their own, just take a look at any of those celeb mags - OK!, Hello! etc!, etc! Countless people with pointless little lives want to live other peoples lives. Can you imagine any of those talentless people like Gaga, or Paris Hilton, or Simon Cowell wearing Glass (or whatever it develops into)? Sure, you'll only get their edited version of "their" life - but I'd bet you everything I own that this WILL become a reality and people WILL flock to this. Just look at Twitter and the hundreds of thousands who hang on the every word of pointless "famous for being famous" people.

Coming to a face near you very very soon.

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Thumb Down

"humanity's quest for knowledge"

I think he meant - "Google's quest for more data"

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Anonymous Coward

The oldest reason in the world

Why Glass ? Because Sergey wanted to shag Amanda Rosenberg and this was the best way to build a relationship.

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Boffin

Glass and glasses

Serious question: is Glass compatible with glasses, or do speccy-four-eyes persons like myself have to live a life devoid of Googley goggley face-mounted tech?

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Stop

I'm very pessimistic about Google Glasses. It's not the technology, I like the technology! I think the eventual benefit and excitement of augmented reality could be mahoosive!

What I don't like, is the Google... having one of their personal data hoovers in my pocket is bad enough, having one on my face capturing everything I see and do is a country mile overstep beyond the 'creepy line'.

If all the data collected was entirely (and I mean entirely) within my control and ownership I'd be more convinced, but this, like all their other services already prove, just isn't how Google works.

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Silver badge

while we're at it.

http://xkcd.com/1251/

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Silver badge

2 things we'd need first

Obviously people are already using computers as extensions to their brains, just like they do with pieces of paper.

However to actually be able to do this you need 2 things:

First of all, such systems need to be free as in free speech. You, the owner must be able to completely control them. That means free and open source software, without any limitations from companies.

Second, to be able to use a computer efficiently, you need to be able to program it. This means your education needs to contain at least a little bit of programming. You need to be able to understand and modify simple programs. Only then you can tell your computer what to do.

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Anonymous Coward

vhs

pov porn.

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Change the world?

Yes, it certaily will. WIth Google glass, Google will have even more access to your personal life and be able to collect even more data on what you do and say. The sales potential of this is incredible. Not to mention how much governments will appreciate the last vestiges of your personal privacy being wiped out.

No Google anything for me. Not now, not ever.

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Voice control

I just had a thought. Since this rubbish will be voice activated, does that mean that when a bunch of mouth breathing tourists are all standing around staring at something and one of them says "Go go glasses camera" or whatever nonsense they program in to make it click and upload, does that mean every other pair of these pointless articles within hearing distance will also click?

Up to an including the hapless sod that jumped behind the wall to take a leak and happened to be staring at his member when the camera went off? If it automatically uploads to whatever facebook style drivelfest that wearer is signed up to and emails all his friends with an update, would that not be slightly emabarrassing?

This sounds very like the XBone with always on Kinect. "XBox ON" is apparently the supersecret code phrase for turning the XBox on. Now if I'm sitting in my living room talking to someone and I say, "That new Xbox is crap and invasive. I haven't turned the XBox on in weeks", then chances are I will hear the jet engine roar of the lurker in the corner firing up.

Voice control is only useful if it isn't going to intrude on your, and most imoportantly, everybody else's life.

I personally will be seeing how this turns out with intrest. Especially if these intrusive little foibles end up being allowed in public places.

If so, then my entrance to any public toilet in the land will be acoompanied by a shout of "Google glasses take picture" and then listen to see how many pervert clicks I can hear.

And any firends who have one will be asked to leave them at the door so the neighbourhood cats can use those as a crapper instead of my lawn.

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