back to article Foundering Nokia pushes 10,000 bods, 3 veeps overboard

Nokia will shed another 10,000 staff by the end of next year, and has shuffled its VP pack in the ongoing struggle to make money against increasing competition. It's not just the workers getting the boot this time around, three existing vice presidents are "stepping down ... to pursue other opportunities outside of Nokia", and …

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Living on IPR income?

"...eventually one of the large players will get fed up of paying the fees and just buy them out."

Three guesses whom my money's on (clue, should you need one: Elop used to work for them (and from his actions, some might forgiveably ask if he ever stopped)).

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Anonymous Coward

Just a bit of pruning

before the MS takeover...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Just a bit of pruning

Spot on, but it'll be a while yet, after their cash mountain has run out and they are nearing administration. Why pay top price when you can wait and get all the IPR for a bargain?

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Facepalm

Foundering?

Floundering, shurely.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Foundering?

(of a ship) Fill with water and sink

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Re: Foundering?

Foundering? Floundering? Fill a ship with water, to sink?

Any derivative from the word "(s)cuttlefish"?

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Er, I don't get it

The story reads to me that Nokia is getting rid of 10000 staff that it suddenly realised it doesn't actually need in order to operate. What were they doing anyway - surely not 10000 in R&D, and what else is there.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Er, I don't get it

I've no idea about the detail but one thing they are doing is shifting phone manufacturing to the Far East like Apple and Android suppliers and the rest have already done. I'm not convinced about the need to drop manufacturing in the West but Nokia is only following the crowd in which context staff reductions make sense.

They'll still be paying about 45,000 employees which represents a good contribution to Western economies for a firm now valued at about $10 billion (less than 15% of Facebook valuation).

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Stop

"Nokia aims to further develop its Series 40 and 30 devices..." they're like an addict that can't give up. Is there really a profitable market for 50 quid phones?

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Anonymous Coward

Yes

Just because there isn't a market you see, doesn't mean there isn't one... Lots of Africa would be a good starter.

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Stop

@Nokia: Still Missing C or C++ APIs for Series 30

No, J2ME does not cut it.

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iPhone

Even my plumber has an iPhone now! "It's great, whenever a customer doesn't have their boiler manual, I just download it to my iPhone from my ftp server!" OK, how many plumbers have an ftp server, but still.

Nokia certainly had problems before they hooked up with Microsoft and may have ultimately gone down the drain anyway, *but* it is safe to say they have alienated their fan base by talking down Symbian and dumping Maemo/Meego. I won a N900 in a "Nokia raffle" and I think it's great. Unfortunately, the navigation is rubbish and now of course it will never be improved. In the end I bought a second hand E7-00 off Amazon to replace my E90. At least it has up to date navigation and a real keyboard.

When Symbian is finally killed off, I don't know what I'll get in the future. Everyone at work has Android phones of course.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: iPhone

Not me, I have been a Nokia user since my second mobile in circa 1995, I stopped when I'd had three stinkers in a row. The last one the 5800 xpress music (IIRC) was the last straw, promised lots, delivered sod all, chunky, easily scratched, resistive touchscreen, crashy, bad sync to PC, would duplicate users and events, generally stank. I replaced it with an HTC, which was great. I look forward to trying out some new Nokias when I replace the HTC.

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Re: iPhone

Similar to Ben: except for my first mobile (a Phillips Savvy) and an excruciatingly bad experience with a Sony Ericcson (which I was given when my nephew upgraded), I have always had Nokias (four or five in the last 15 years (okay, I buy my own, and tend not to change until I really want to. My current one is a 5230, my first smartphone. It is true that navigating the Symbian OS is ... well, shall we say long-winded, and the auto-turn control needs resetting every now and again, but otherwise, it is great. Nokia Maps is better than any dedicated satnav I have ever used, and doesn't need a connection to the internet to use it (which Google/Bing maps do, surely). The phone is rugged, drags in a good signal, and is small enough to fit in the same holster (yes, I know, but they are practical and keep the phone protected without filling up a pocket) I used for my previous Nokia 32-something (see, I told you I don't change stuff often!)

I will probably change the phone in the next 12 months, because there are too many useful programs (I hate the word "Apps") for the main OSs that Symbian doesn't have. However, none of the options look good - Android seems to be a tracking program with some functionality as an OS; I have no intention of joining the iCrowd because of the walled garden; and Windows ... well, shall we say that I have yet to be convinced. Where is the decent Linux (proper Linux, that is) phone?

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Re: iPhone

"Android seems to be a tracking program with some functionality as an OS"

This is nicely put. I really used to like Google but it's hard not to be suspicious of them now. Maybe it was the slogan "Don't be evil" which made me look at their behaviour more closely; this claim that they are ethically better than other companies almost demands closer attention.

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Re: iPhone

Thanks, 5.antiago. It's depressing, given what Google could have been, but suspicion is now the default when dealing with them.

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Thumb Up

The real question I have is why they did not even release ONE Android handset., like almost every other handset manufacturer.

The answer lies buried somewhere in their agreement with Microsoft.

With android they would have been to market sooner, and given the people what they want.

I have no sympathy for them whatsoever, let them fall.

Best scenario would be an android consortium of google and handset manufacturers to buy the patents to further protect Androids growth.

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Anonymous Coward

Why no Android phone? Isn't it obvious? Microsoft.

Microsoft.

I'm quite sure that according to the terms of the 'strategic partnership' between Nokia and Microsoft, Nokia is banned from releasing any Android phones. Even the promising Meego was killed in its cradle.

Even the 41 megapixel Nokia 808 PureView running Symbian, obviously a niche phone for photography enthusiasts, has its worldwide availability deliberately limited.

Do you honestly think that Elop the Microsoft trojan horse will allow any form of competition with Windows phones? You now the answer, I know the answer.

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Mushroom

They need to drop ELOP

Fire the former Microsoftie !

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Silver badge
Coat

Re: They need to drop ELOP

Why should they? The rundown of Nokia is proceeding according to plan, the MS Plan.

Get the share price so low they can be seen as riding in and rescuing them from death.

However their market share is getting so low these days that MS might have a battle on their hands to acquire Nokia.

There will be a number of other companies who could stump up the cash on the nail to get hold of Nokia even if it is just out of spite.

Mines the one with a 6310i in the pocket.

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Devil

Microsoft peers through periscope torpedo sight

^ There FTFY.

No charge.

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Anonymous Coward

Ulm closed?

Isn't that where Meltemi is being worked on?

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Re: Ulm closed?

Yes. Meltemi joins the list of Nokia OS's beginning with 'M' that have been tossed overboard. If they were going to release Meltemi in a device they would have released it before now, and they wouldn't have released so many phones with S40 on them recently.

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Anonymous Coward

I take it those VP's walked, or else Jo 'Directionless' Harlow would/should have got the bullet too.

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Anonymous Coward

WP8 'Apollo'

Windows Phone Summit. By this time next week we'll know a lot more about WP8 and possibly how WP7 fits into the picture for low budget phones. How this fits into the Nokia strategy is of somewhat more interest than the fate of a few execs.

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Silver badge
Facepalm

"We intend to pursue an even more focused effort on the Lumia"

Carry on digging, Steve...

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Windows

Had to go outside to stop laughing...

* "At the press conference, Nokia's leadership stressed the ongoing importance of the Salo facility, although some 80 percent of its staff is being made redundant."

You couldn't make this up!

*http://yle.fi/uutiset/elop_nokia_is_not_leaving_finland/6181561

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Had to go outside to stop laughing...

Stephen Elop should quit the IT industry and consider a career in politics.

He has mastered the art of doublespeak very well.

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Anonymous Coward

Please sack Stephen Elop now

Any dunce can lay off plenty of workers, discontinue products/services just to make the already dismal corporate results look more palatable (e.g. Carol Bartz during her stint at Yahoo).

But Elop is killing Nokia now. He is a disaster. And now, he has brought in another ex-Microsoftie (Chris Weber).

Eradicate this cancer now, Nokia board. How long must you wait before you wake up?

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Silver badge

Re: Please sack Stephen Elop now

It's too late, I bet most of the board have been replaced by body snatchers too.

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Windows

Holy upside down equity, Batman

Nokia market capitalization as of right now: $8.1 Billion

Nokia cash and short term investments as of 3/31/2012: $12.5 Billion

I'm not optimistic about Nokia's prospects, but there's something wrong with this picture. This is not a sustainable condition.

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Windows

Denial is often the harbinger of truth...

Elop's statement:

"Nokia is not leaving Finland".

Why did he need to reiterate that, unless it's in his mind? Further I read "The company's most important product development work and headquarters will remain in the country, pledged CEO Stephen Elop on Thursday afternoon"

That leaves an awful lot out. What about the slightly less important product development work, or slightly lesser office functions (HR, services, etc)?

You can't blame Elop for all the company's woes. The rot set in when Simon Beresford-Wylie joined with Siemens to form NSN (Nokia Siemens Networks) in 2007. It meant - and still does - a huge drain on Nokia's balance sheet. Much less cash to fight with.

Ref: http://yle.fi/uutiset/nokia_in_finland_a_giant_becomes_a_weight_watcher/6182380

Oddly, I was made redundant in 2007, for 'headcount reduction' reasons. I smirk when I see the light blue (NSN) on the graph after '07...

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WTF?

Competitive industry dynamics

That must be norwegian for "our phones suck a$$"

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The thing is...

Nokia is now one in a long long LOOOOOOONG list of companies who have "partnered" with Microsoft only to go down in flames because of it. Maybe it's not too late for them... maybe... But it will take many many years for them to come back from the MS partnership.

They were doomed the minute they hired a Microsoft exec as their head honcho.

You can argue the quality of the Ms product into the ground... it doesn't matter. History doesn't lie.

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