back to article Microsoft has signed up to the Open Invention Network. We repeat. Microsoft has signed up to the OIN

Who would have thought it? Not content with signing with LOT Network, Microsoft has taken the next step in patent cuddling and joined the Open Invention Network. A month shy of its 14th birthday, the Open Invention Network (OIN) was obviously very happy to welcome the beast of Redmond, and 60,000 or so of its patents, into the …

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AAA

or Admiral Akbar Applies.

At times like this, look for giant fish in Admiral's uniform, giving a warning.

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Re: AAA

Perhaps it is the other way around. Microsoft buying Github means they will be distributing a very large amount of GPL software. The cannot do that and charge patent royalties on it at the same time (unless they have a similar understanding of the law SCO).

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Re: AAA

Or given M$'s history, perhaps not.

Though it is said that past actions don't influence future probabilities, or something to similar effect.

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Re: AAA

unless they have a similar understanding of the law SCO).

Didn't Microsoft supply funds to SCO at one point in the trial when SCO were running low on cash?

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Linux

Does that mean?

Does that mean that Microsoft Corporation and its business partners, including but not limited to the SCO Group, will stop prosecuting Linux users (expecially corporate entities) for real or presumed violation of their many patents?

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Re: Does that mean?

No. It means that OIN can raise more money off the backs of others, from large corporations all the way to the little hobbyist.

While I truly do not read into this, some will think now that Microsoft had joined up, the financial motives of OIN might be more visible (but to me it's MS just trying to open doors top customers).

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Linux

Re: Does that mean? -- Microsoft Fearing Litigation?

So many questions. One possibility--which boggles the mind--is that Microsoft might(?) have seen an advantage in gaining the OIN litigation protection for themselves. Wouldn't that be the strongest bottom-line justification? Is there a PR side to this? Do we have to be frenemies now?

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Re: Does that mean?

On 60,000 patents. Not on their other 30,000+ patents.

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OIN(K)... Authentic indeed!

"the litmus test for authentic behavior in the OSS community includes OIN participation”.

Yep. 14 years ago there was no such thing as authentic OSS since OIN(K) didn't exist.

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Trollface

Re: OIN(K)... Authentic indeed!

It's a PR release. Did you expect the truth?

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Joke

Re: OIN(K)...

Those 60000 odd patents must be catalogued for easy retrieval in...

Open Invention Network Knowledgebase

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Re: OIN(K)...

Each one will have it's own Patent Indentifier Guid.

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Windows

Is this a sales pitch for Azure?

You know, a kind of "it's now safe to run your Linux workloads on Azure, because we won't sue you for patent infringement?"

Or am I just being cynical?

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Re: Is this a sales pitch for Azure?

No, More like "we won't sue you now. Later? Who knows?"

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Incredible! This is huge news!

Innovation for the win!

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NTFS in base repos now?

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Trollface

That's what Twoface at Redmond's top echelons would like you to believe.

The other face is like:

So that filth ReactOS forks it over and comes a step closer to fully impersonating our Dear Windows?

No way.

(Of course somebody is going to be like:

root@localhost:~ # ssh twoface@twoface.microsoft.com

The authenticity of the fingerprint of the .... verified. Do you want to connect? HELL YAAH!

twoface@twoface.microsoft.com:~ # systemctl start reboot.target

Connection lost

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Anonymous Coward

"NTFS in base repos now ?"

Don't count on that. It's Windows world and they will milk the cow until the end.

Which, with the advent of steam play may not be far from now ...

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Anonymous Coward

"NTFS in base repos now?"

No, Windows related patents are specifically not included. You can't expect Microsoft to suddenly allow direct ripoffs of their own IP.

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DJV
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Blimey!

Did hell just freeze over?

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Re: Blimey!

No, that's gonna happen when Apple joins said consortium too.

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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Blimey!

I just saw a dog and a cat walking together down the street paw in paw, I think so!

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Re: Blimey!

"I just saw a dog and a cat walking together down the street paw in paw, I think so!"

I'd imagine more likely limping given the difficulty for them of doing that. ;-)

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Re: Blimey!

It's quite easy on two legs.

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Trojan horse?

(no pun intended)

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Trollface

Re: Trojan horse?

More like Redomdian donkey.

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strange indeed

These are strange days ...

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Makes you wonder.

"OIN? let's embrace, extend, ... extinguish."

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Android?

Microsoft makes billions from extorting Android makers on their flimsy patents. Is this practice now going to end?

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(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Android?

Microsoft has, TTBOMK, wound down its Android patent shakedown.

C.

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Re: Android?

Extortion is a serious word to be throwing around.

If anyone has a valid patent and does good licensing deals then I say fair enough. Obvs not all those patent troll firms.

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Re: Android?

The "software" patents were obvious things, which had already been implemented years/decades earlier, just a bunch of "on a mobile device" patents ...

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Re: Phil Kingston

I am confident what you consider a valid patent and the standard of the patents that are actually awarded are very different. The big problem with the EFF's stupid patent of the month is the thousands of thoroughly deserving patents granted each month that miss their chance of fame.

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Re: Android?

There are no valid software patents, so yeah, extortion.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Android?

"Microsoft makes billions from extorting Android makers on their flimsy patents.".

Microsoft has over 200 patents infringed by Android of which a number were tested in court and Microsoft won out on almost every case so I don't see how their claims are in anyway "flimsy".

If you want to use someone else's patented technology its perfectly normal to have to pay for that. You might not like Microsoft but why should Google or its agents get to use Microsoft inventions for free?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Android?

"The "software" patents were obvious things"

Microsoft's android related patents are not in that category. For instance FAT32 is non obvious. Otherwise Microsoft wouldnt have won the numerous court cases in various jurisdictions over these patents.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Android?

"For instance FAT32 is non obvious."

Bad example - there are numerous records of the FAT32 patents in particular being very flimsy. In fact Linus Torvalds himself had actually implemented prior art of one of them.

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Re: Android?

I read that as tittybonk

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Android?

"Bad example - there are numerous records of the FAT32 patents in particular being very flimsy."

Not according to patent courts of several countries.

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Anonymous Coward

In a world of pickpockets, snake oil salesman, scam artists and the like I've learned to be cynical and ask what's the angle; this is no different.

Why is Bernard Madoff offering an investment portfolio ?

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Unhappy

It's a duck

You know the rest.

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Good move Microsoft! Now let's see a properly open implementation of ExFAT.

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Anonymous Coward

Just maybe...

Maybe Microsoft were afraid of getting sued themselves, for using and distributing Linux. Maybe MS are looking at a cost cutting exercise around their kernel team. Maybe hell has indeed frozen over.

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Pint

If it knows it lost mobile, it knows it can lose a heck of a lot more

No panic here for the rest of us, it's just a drowning corporate clutching at whatever it can.

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Re: If it knows it lost mobile, it knows it can lose a heck of a lot more

Amazing that in North America the Windows CE based phones once had 20% + and Nokia was hardly known there yet #1 worldwide. Also that CE dominated PDAs.

I was baffled in 1999 when mostly installing MS and giving Linux training as to why Exchange was so popular.

For the last ten years I've wondered why people use MS SQL and IIS. Even earlier than that we had Apache web server, MySQL and PHP on Windows 2000 server. We moved to Linux Server when the Windows Update Server wasn't needed.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: If it knows it lost mobile, it knows it can lose a heck of a lot more

"it's just a drowning corporate clutching at whatever it can."

You realise Microsoft's share price and revenue are at records highs?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: If it knows it lost mobile, it knows it can lose a heck of a lot more

"why Exchange was so popular."

Easy - high functionality and integration together with one of the lowest TCOs. Exchange + Outlook really doesnt have much competition. Unless you count Notes and that was horrific to use and to manage.

"why people use MS SQL and IIS"

Well a way better security vulnerability record than a LAMP stack plus again far greater ease of use and integration would be a start. Hence why these days IIS has over 40% of all websites versus Apache on 22% according to Netcraft.

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Re: If it knows it lost mobile, it knows it can lose a heck of a lot more

"Hence why these days IIS has over 40% of all websites versus Apache on 22% according to Netcraft." .... you're looking at the wrong metric.

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Re: If it knows it lost mobile, it knows it can lose a heck of a lot more

"integration"

The word you may be looking for is "lock-in".

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Anonymous Coward

Re: If it knows it lost mobile, it knows it can lose a heck of a lot more

"you're looking at the wrong metric."

I'm looking at the exact same metric that was always quoted for Apache when it was popular.

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