back to article Linux kernel's Torvalds: 'I am truly sorry' for my 'unprofessional' rants, I need a break to get help

Linux kernel firebrand Linus Torvalds has apologized for his explosive rants, and vowed to take a break from the open-source project and seek help. In a mailing list message on Sunday, Torvalds admitted his "flippant attacks in emails" to fellow Linux programmers and project contributors "have been both unprofessional and …

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    1. whitepines Bronze badge
      Linux

      Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

      I'll take and/or ignore the CoC and keep my full rights to use the full source over any of your Orwellian, consumer-focused, data-mining, privacy-invading, disastrously buggy crap any day.

      What happens when Microsoft gets sued for letting one of its cloud renters offend the crowd you seem so convinced will destroy Linux?

      1. Snow Wombat
        Trollface

        Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

        You really think the new Rainbow haired management will have the same commitment to privacy and security?

        They are the first ones to bend over for their corporate overlords.

        Well, I guess if the OS is a buggy, broken, dysfunctional toxic mess, like say... the Node.js and freeBSD communities are right now, that's a KIND of security I guess.

        If you can't get the machine up and running, can't get the data off it.

        1. whitepines Bronze badge

          Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

          What bearing does that have on anything? If the technology gets sloppy someone else will step up and fork it. Too much relies on Linux actually working well for that not to happen.

          Obviously I hope it doesn't come to that, but even if it does, most of the OSS userspace is somewhat kernel-agnostic. At least the sane parts of it.

          1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            "Obviously I hope it doesn't come to that, but even if it does, most of the OSS userspace is somewhat kernel-agnostic. "

            Too much of it on the IoT side is also quality, security and privacy agnostic.

    2. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Devil

      Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

      from article: "vowed to take a break from the open-source project and seek help."

      Damn. I wonder who it was that got to him...

      LINUS! DO NOT LISTEN TO *THEM*! Be YOURSELF, because BEING COMMITTED TO QUALITY and letting those who deserve it have BOTH BARRELS with FULL PROFANITY is actually a GOOD thing!

      That, and it's entertaining when it hits the news.

      1. This post has been deleted by a moderator

        1. 45RPM Silver badge

          Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

          @Snow Wombat

          Partly right. I agree - he’s done a terrific job, and he does sound mentally exhausted. I know how he feels - I feel something similar when I see a bad or incompetent job done and, unfortunately, I react in much the same way. It’s miserable and I know that the problem is partly mine - a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb. I need a break. But…

          I disagree utterly with your assertion that the rainbow haired pronoun crowd will burn everything to the ground. You seem to be suggesting that tolerance of other people’s identity, whether sexual, gender, religious, and anything else, is a bad thing. Live and let live. Provided that they’re not spoiling your day by telling you that you’re living your life wrong, do them the courtesy of letting them live their lives as they choose - and never forget that some of the best engineers in this computing game are gay / transsexual / female / black - and don’t conform to the heterosexual white male stereotype.

          1. Grikath Silver badge

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            "Provided that they’re not spoiling your day by telling you that you’re living your life wrong,"

            Which is exactly what they are doing... but hey..

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

            Sometimes, but not always. I tried that approach with a developer (a Linux one, BTW), who were often at odds with his former team. I tried to "empower" him and encourage him. He just took advantage of it. He kept on being late on delivering code, and what was delivered was barely working. I tried to be kind and encouraged him to deliver better code on time, for himself and the team. He didn't.

            One delivery would have been a failure if I didn't rewrite, fixed and finished his code in time. Of course, that made him even lazier, because he got away with it. I warned management about it, but nothing happened. The delivery was OK, so why take action?

            The next cycle I didn't fix his code - until in a meeting it was discovered - despite my several warnings before - in three months his code wasn't finished and buggy. Just, after listening to his excuses, and be asked how to deliver in time (aka "please write you the code in time"), I lost my temper - and yelled at him.

            I got a reprimand by HR, but at least he asked to be moved elsewhere, where probably he's attempting the same tricks.

            I think Torvalds is luckier and works with far better developers, but sometimes you encounter people who makes you steam, and you need to let the steam go out for your health's sake.

            1. SolidSquid

              Re: "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

              Yeah, or maybe you could have just held him to the deadlines you'd both agreed to without the yelling or letting things escalate? I mean, it sounds like he was pretty bad as a developer, but also seems you weren't any better as a manager

              1. 45RPM Silver badge

                Re: "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

                @SolidSquid. Exactly this. The F-Bomb isn’t necessary, and its use is indicative, perhaps, of a nervous breakdown. And yes, have an upvote, it’s use is very bad management.

                But, after recognising the problem, and fixing it, it should be possible to come back from the brink - and be good at the job again.

                1. amanfromMars 1 Silver badge

                  A gentle word will achieve more than any f-bomb. And Real Gentle Words are Almighty

                  ........ with Immaculate Stringing

                  But, after recognising the problem, and fixing it, it should be possible to come back from the brink - and be good at the job again. ... 45RPM

                  Amen to that Almighty Jewel, 45RPM, and Good to XSS is the Sweetest of Redemptions for the Exercising of Greatness.

              2. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                "but also seems you weren't any better as a manager"

                The issue is it was impossible to held him to the deadlines. He agreed on them - and often I allowed him more time than a skilled developer needed - and then utterly ignored them, producing different excuses. Being kind and remembering him how important it was for him, the team and the company to deliver good code in time was utterly useless.

                He knew someone else would have done his job to avoid issues, as I later discovered his previous team did as well.

                Unluckily I had no power to force him to met deadlines in other ways, because while I was in charge of the technical aspects of the project, I had no power on people because their management was assigned to a "business" manager, not to the team leader. As long as he didn't have "business" troubles, everything was fine.

                And HR didn't want to manage issues, as long as nothing really bad happens, so troublesome people were just assigned to a different team. And incredibly, someone losing his temper is for them worse than someone getting a salary for doing nothing - because in the latter case they can assign the fault to someone else, while a confrontation needs to be addressed by them.

                IIRC he was once kindly asked to work better, but once again, it was useless. Some people as soon as they understand they can get away with it without consequences, they won't change habits.

                I came to a point where I had only two choice: A) Keep on making other team members do his work B) Let things escalate.

                Just, when I saw they weren't going to address the real issue, and just hoped someone would have again written and fixed the code, and nothing else, I lost my temper.

                1. AdamWill

                  Re: "but also seems you weren't any better as a manager"

                  "The issue is it was impossible to held him to the deadlines. He agreed on them - and often I allowed him more time than a skilled developer needed - and then utterly ignored them, producing different excuses. Being kind and remembering him how important it was for him, the team and the company to deliver good code in time was utterly useless."

                  You're sort of posing a false dichotomy here, though. There aren't only two choices: 1) scream abuse at people, 2) be kind to them and work around them at all costs for fear of upsetting their precious sensitivities. (In fact, ironically, in my experience it tends to be the case in broken situations that important people get to yell and scream all they like, while everyone else has to bend over backwards to not step on their precious toes).

                  It's perfectly possible to point out that the developer in question is not doing the job properly, and to progress from there to formal performance review measures and ultimately disciplinary measures if there really is a long-term problem, all without being abusive, hurtful or personally disrespectful. Millions of people manage to be involved in processes like this every day. It's not rocket science.

            2. jake Silver badge

              Re: "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

              "He kept on being late on delivering code, and what was delivered was barely working. I tried to be kind"

              Kind? Why? I'd have fired his useless ass.

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                "Kind? Why? I'd have fired his useless ass."

                In a big company, you may not have the authority to fire people. And those who have it, not always have to suffer the issue those people bring, as long as someone shields them to keep the boat afloat.

                Also, in some countries, firing people is not so easy as in the US - especially where unions blindly protect even the most useless ass - usually because they are from the same category. And who cares if those damages all the people who work hard and conscientiously, and are paid the same.

                Anyway, I can understand someone may have temporary issues and an hard time working properly - so I can try to be kind and wait for the issues to be resolved. But when I find it's just a lifestyle, well, I'm not someone who can accept it.

                1. jake Silver badge

                  Re: "Kind? Why? I'd have fired his useless ass."

                  Oh, horseshit. The useless ass was hire to code. He refused to code. He's thus useless to the company, and no longer on the payroll. Unless you can point me at a company that will happily keep me on the payroll for not doing the job I was hired to do, of course. Note I said "company" not "government" ...

                  1. Anonymous Coward
                    Anonymous Coward

                    "Unless you can point me at a company that will happily keep me"

                    There's a reason why Dilbert has a character like Wally. In large enough company, you can find people who know how to game the system.

                  2. Someone Else Silver badge
                    Pint

                    @jake -- Re: "Kind? Why? I'd have fired his useless ass."

                    Unless you can point me at a company that will happily keep me on the payroll for not doing the job I was hired to do, of course. Note I said "company" not "government" ...

                    Dammit, jake, you just pre-empted my response....

                  3. ryokeken

                    Re: "Kind? Why? I'd have fired his useless ass."

                    "Unless you can point me at a company that will happily keep me on the payroll for not doing the job I was hired to do, of course. Note I said "company" not "government" "

                    UBER?

                    Dunno, I was always under the impression that's how Microsoft made Windows.

                    That I know personally Xerox most definitely does/done that, UBS Warburg it whatever was called in the 00's. can't mention others because NDAs, I've also witnessed this in a few business units where if you're bringing a few millions in sales the person on the receiving end is fired for provoking the bully.

                    I worked as a low end tech for a few years and in catering for a couple more. It's amazing the shit you can witness if you make yourself small and keep your ears open.

            3. oiseau
              Thumb Up

              Re: "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

              I think Torvalds is luckier and works with far better developers, but sometimes you encounter people who makes you steam, and you need to let the steam go out for your health's sake.

              +1

              Exactly ...

              Sometimes DHs will be and behave like the only thing they know how or want to be: DHs.

              And the more responsibility you have on you as theiir supervisor, the less you can afford to tolerate them as it will all eventually reflect on you.

              Cheers,

              O.

            4. AdamWill

              Re: "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

              "I lost my temper - and yelled at him.

              I got a reprimand by HR, but at least he asked to be moved elsewhere, where probably he's attempting the same tricks."

              So, er, you're saying that yelling at him didn't actually solve the problem at all, but just moved it away from where you had to care about it? And that's a reason why it's a good thing?

              "sometimes you encounter people who makes you steam, and you need to let the steam go out for your health's sake."

              ah - so that's the *real* benefit. It was a benefit purely to you, never mind the consequences for anyone else. And hey, maybe you do need to let off steam sometimes. But why not let off steam at the wall, or a sympathetic colleague of choice, rather than yelling at someone, especially if it's not actually going to do them or the project any good at all? Why not consider not just "your health", but the health of the person getting yelled at, and the health of everyone who has to work in the context of the yelling?

              If someone's constantly acting in a way that's a problem for the project, there are practical ways of actually addressing that problem. "Scream abuse at them" is not one of those ways. Also, AFAIK, in most of the cases where Linus lost it at someone, they weren't an ongoing source of problems in the way you describe in your scenario, they were just some poor rando who happened to get their commit reviewed when Linus needed to "let the steam go".

            5. russmichaels

              Re: "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

              I can relate to that.

              Everyone makes mistakes now and then, but there are a lot of people out there who do sloppy work and simply cannot be bothered to check it properly and do not care what problems it causes for others.

              I have worked with such people, and I cannot think of any instances were asking nicely has helped at all, I can, however, think of several instances where losing my temper and delivering an f-bomb did make a difference.

            6. TG2.2

              Re: "a gentle word will probably achieve more than the f-bomb"

              @anon coward .. :-) reminds me of when I got a Cert'd Network Engineer dismissed because not only did I find him posting our network config on-line and asking if stuff I suggested would work, but then he had the nerve to tell me I couldn't publish *internal* DNS records for facebook, myspace, and other time-wasters that our employees were on at the time.

              I got tired of arguing with him in a meeting about it, went back to my desk, created said zones for internal DNS distribution, sent an email to our boss asking him to go to www.facebook.com on his work computer and waited. Boss called me in, asked me to explain what I did .. I created zones in our Active Directory domain, saying only to our internal offices that *we* were authoritative for "facebook" and set it to a 1 page IIS site on the intranet with a big red stop sign - "Facebook is no longer an allowed destination for company users due to chronic productivity loss" ... I then rolled it out to 35 satellite offices along with 15 other domains we found too many people wasting time on. The following day the "Engineer" was no longer with us, adding one more entry to his 15 jobs in 3 years CV.

          3. Jedipadawan

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            I do not sense the Linus is exhausted. He makes it clear he is up and ready to keep on with the Linux kernel.

            Putting side the rainbow nature of the CoC - which I hope gets modified for the Linux world - it sounds more like a wake up moment.

            I spent many years in IT and it is true that those that prepfer to commuicate with machines tendto lack empathy and social skills when it comes to other human beings. I think it's partly personality. Using the Myers-Briggs typology as an indicator - just an indicator for reference purposes - the description of the INTP is virtually THE description of the generic coder. I describe this type as; "You think I'm weird, I think you're stupid. Now let me talk to this machine that is more intelligent than you." I'm at the reverse end of the spectrum (INFP) and had to become less co-dependent and more results focused. There is a need to work on the reverse for others!

            Linux has realised he CAN hurt people and it DOES matter after a while. Programmers might well have rhino hides and have a "if you can't take the heat get out of the kitchen approach" but that rarely works in a management role long timer - which is the position Linus is in. The last company I worked for in the UK I understand has moved to a total rule by fear regime and all the old staff have walked out... some of them literally walked out the door, redundancy pay, leave period be stuffed! Even hard nosed, non-people people developers need some recognition and to be treated as human beings.

            Also not that super-ego Steve Jobs had to learn a little humility through his NeXT disaster in order to come back stronger than before. It does not take a lot of humility to leaven the person!

            I hope the CoC is adapted, Linus only said "will be based" not "will be the CoC" and I hope that he stays in and stays code ruthless! But there are ways of doing it and it's best to act nice and move to nasty in a scale when there is a repeated pattern of bad behaviour rather than going straight to asshole! You save that one for last warning before dismissal!

            1. Tom Paine Silver badge

              Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

              Sorry to break this to you, but Myers-Briggs is widely recognised (at last!) as baloney.

          4. Snow Wombat

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            yes cos things are going just swimmingly over at Node.js, FreeBSD, Python project.....

          5. bombastic bob Silver badge
            Devil

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            " You seem to be suggesting that tolerance of other people’s identity, whether sexual, gender, religious, and anything else, is a bad thing. Live and let live."

            I don't think he meant intolerance. When I read the phrase 'rainbow haired pronoun crowd', I see those who seek to foist their version of morality upon the rest of us through political correctness, "all about feelings", yotta yotta.

            'Live and let Live' works _BOTH_ ways, ya know. It's the "force" part that I dislike about the 'rainbow haired pronoun crowd'. [they can be as gay or straight or religious or not, whatever they want, freedom. Just don't take MY freedom away in the process].

            In any case, the 'rainbow haired pronoun crowd' seeks to create chaos, not solve problems. They whine if you don't use the correct term of the day and add "phobe" to many of the adjectives they use about you (and also add 'mis' as a prefix), always a pejorative accusation, always shrill, always irritating and disruptive, and RARELY correct.

            THAT, I am pretty sure, is what Snow Wombat meant when he said 'rainbow haired pronoun crowd'. It's why I like the term. It's perfect.

            (falling into the 'I am offended' or 'he might be offended' trap is too easy. it's best NOT to even go near it. And I chose to use 'he' because it's grammatically correct. HAH!)

            1. Cavanuk

              Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

              "'Live and let Live' works _BOTH_ ways, ya know."

              No, actually it doesn't. If you have one side calling for tolerance of diversity and another calling for conformity to their idea of normality then it is the latter that has a problem, not the former. Races in a minority did not have to just live and let live with racially offensive words, for example. Rightly, they objected and attitudes changed. The same logic applies to gender and sexuality. If you don't recognize the right of every individual to be who they truly are then it is you that is not following "live and let live".

          6. bussdriver

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            Sometimes people need to be shaken up. The reason you don't swear all the time is because it has no shock value or meaning if you do. But when you do it shouldn't distract completely from the added emphasis it is supposed to create. These PC fools have a Pavlovian response which brings out their inner Stasi .

            Culture. you have a group of nerds with thick skins who communicate by text; getting the seriousness across requires something different over that medium and to that type of person. This was a community of volunteers who are strong willed to be there in the first place. It has grown large and diverse so it's not the same situation as before. Sticking to the past makes sense because it worked and everybody bitching has zero success at building a world changing volunteer project. At this phase, it's a different game - maybe Linus will decide to go start up new community projects which is where his strongest talent is. What keeps him and many other founders from doing that is because TIME is equated to value. He invested his life into it so letting it go is incredibly hard because of the perceived value to him. There will be other people better suited to be in charge of what it has become; however, I do not expect those to rise to that position if we keep allowing the PC bullies to eliminate all forms of meritocracy.

        2. Justthefacts

          Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

          “Rainbow-haired pronoun people”

          He finally looked in the mirror and realised that he created and enabled *people like you*. That’s what this is about.

          In your view, bullying people for their gender and sexuality is not just OK but somehow morally *necessary* as a badge of belonging.

          That’s why most women don’t want to be software engineers, and most gay engineers are *still* afraid to come out in their workplace long after the world changed. How many are there in yours? Don’t know? Because *you* are the problem.

          1. jake Silver badge

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            This line of argument is really fucking stupid. Nowhere have I ever seen Linus berate anybody over their sexuality, gender, (etc. etc.), the only thing he gives a fuck about in this context is the Kernel.

            1. kain preacher Silver badge

              Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

              The OP did not mean Linus but was a shot at Sniw

            2. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

              Bravo. Torvalds might be an excitable, immature and somewhat autistic individual, but he's never gone around making homophobic comments. (Mods, do your stuff please. Not ok.)

          2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            "In your view, bullying people for their gender and sexuality is not just OK but somehow morally *necessary* as a badge of belonging."

            I think the objection is to those who bully others who are simply using long-accepted parts of the English language. Personally, as a male, I suppose I would be entitled to object to "my" gender-specific pronouns being used as non-specific* but it's been that way for a long time so I just accept it. And should my wife object if a customer service person (as like as not female) address us as "you guys"? Personally I find the latter a little over-familiar in most contexts but again it's a generally accepted modern usage so I have to take it in my stride.

            The real problem as I see it is the like of the master/slave row. Trying to rewrite much-used technical terminology is just asking for trouble. The next step in that direction would be to argue about the terms used for handedness of threads - or even the very concept of them being handed.

            *They/their seems fairly natural to me, especially used in a context where the gender or even number of those referred ti is unknown. It was in fairly common use when I was young but I think the grammar zealots consider it an incorrect use of the plural although they seem to consider what has now become standard use of the plural for 2nd person. Actually I think so-called plurality in English is rather more complex than the grammar zealots realise but over the years I've dropped they/their but I'm tending to use it more.

            1. AK565

              Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

              Grammar zealots frequently have poor control of grammar. Asking them to explain the difference between 'who' and 'whom' is frequently quite entertaining.

          3. bombastic bob Silver badge
            Meh

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            @Justthefacts - if you are offended by the term 'rainbow-haired pronoun people' and simply assume it means 'anti-gay' or 'anti-woman', then you just don't get it. It has nothing to do with sexuality nor discrimination.

            It has *EVERYTHING* to do with being a shrill, irritating, chaos-promoting pain in the butt and "political correctness brownshirt" to those that don't conform to your preconceptions of how other people should behave. Saying "Because *you* are the problem" is an example for why so many of us (Linus included, probably) are so EXASPERATED by political correctness. Unwelcome amateur psychology is only an irritant.

            Like I said earlier, "live and let live" works BOTH ways. And if you and people _LIKE_ you plan on disrupting any office you work at with political correctness fascism, please do not apply where I work. thank you. I like getting WORK done.

            [as for race, sex, behavior, religion, and politics, none of those matter to me. just don't be a pain in the ass with any of it. Consider that religious proselytizing at work has been frowned on for decades. Political correctness should be, too. It's about getting work done. Check your feelings at the door (you can stuff them into your coat pocket).]

            1. This post has been deleted by its author

          4. Ronbo13

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            Wow that's a lot of hate and blame... and a lot of hypocrisy too. Maybe you're the guy who would benefit from a mirror?

        3. anothercynic Silver badge

          Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

          @Snow Wombat,

          What's your problem with the rainbow-haired crowd? You won't believe how many rainbow-haired people are excellent and vital contributors to the open source community. And judging people on their hair-colour choice is just... hairist. And why are you so hung up on pronouns? If you want to be known as 'he', fine, or as a 'she', fine... don't apply your binary choices on others who would prefer to be referred to as 'they', or 'it'. Open Source has for a long time been "Live and let live", as long as your code contributes something positive and complies with the rules of the community that you're contributing to. How has it changed?

          As for Linus, it's just about time he realised that he cannot go on like that. If he steps back and takes a breather, then that can only make Linux better. Being a control freak is exhausting... and it's clearly taken a toll.

        4. JDX Gold badge

          Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

          It doesn't matter how smart or valuable you are to a project, there is no excuse for being a bully. You can be utterly committed to quality while remaining professional and not resorting to personal attacks.

          Nobody who had a boss like Linus would enjoy it. Anyone who was like Linus at work should be fired.

          This whole "genius Aspergus" trope is a tired view of computer programmers from 90s movies. We like watching Dr. House on TV but we don't actually want to work with him or be treated by him. We think Sheldon Cooper is funny because it's a joke.

          It's amazing that one man has remained central to Linux for so long, especially someone like Linus. An OS underpinning the entire internet and technology sector, partly under the dominion of one foul-mouthed, very smart jerk.

          The guy at the top sets the tone for the whole ecosystem. Linux has never managed to shake its reputation of impatient, arrogant nerds attacking new users' questions and that's a)probably why it has never made it to the desktop b)arguably all trickling down from Linus' behaviour. A more human Linus could set a far more pleasant culture by example, which could be great for the OSS community and the world in general.

          As for the "rainbow pronoun" comments - sheesh get a grip.

          1. jake Silver badge

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            "Nobody who had a boss like Linus would enjoy it. Anyone who was like Linus at work should be fired."

            But that's just it ... Linus is NOT the boss of the kernel developers. And they are not "at work" in the conventional meaning of the phrase. Applying so-called "normal" standards to FOSS development simply doesn't work. It really is a whole new paradigm. (I shall now refrain from posting for a couple hours, in penance for using the P word.)

          2. TechDrone

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            One man might have be central to the the linux kernel, but the kernel is not everything.

            He says, typing away on a Linux desktop machine running a GUI by someone who never seems to make the headlines for anything other than delivering a pretty stable and reliable product that just works. I'm looking at you Clem.

            And, incidentally, I spend a lot of time reading various Linux forums and lists and most posts are from people genuinely trying to help others and putting a lot of time into their answers and suggestions.

            By your argument, if the guy at the top is such a jerk, why did Windows become so widespread?

          3. HieronymusBloggs Silver badge

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            "Nobody who had a boss like Linus would enjoy it."

            I guess it depends on how thin-skinned you are. I've worked for talented but grumpy people whom I have liked and respected. In those cases it was obvious that any swearing wasn't intended as a personal attack, rather an expression of frustration when things weren't going as well as they should.

            Are most people really so sensitive to perceived criticism that they can't tell the difference?

        5. bombastic bob Silver badge
          Devil

          Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

          "rainbow haired pronoun crowd"

          You know, THAT is such a concise and self-descriptive term that I'm going to have to remember it.

          And yeah I hope Linus just needs a break away from THEM, and not from Linux itself. "They" are EXHAUSTING aren't they? Maybe that's their plan, a form of passive-aggressive BULLYING, wearing down the STRONG individuals until they're too tired to continue, with their constant yapping and nipping at your heels.

        6. fidodogbreath Silver badge

          Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

          I hope he steps away, gets healthy, then kicks back and watches the whole thing burn to the ground as the rainbow haired pronoun crowd destroy it.

          Only abusive straight people can 'do things right?' There's no {point | fun} in even doing something if you can't abuse people in the process? If an abusive straight person is not in charge, Snow Wombat wants the project that runs most of the world's IT infrastructure to crash and burn?

          Lots of bigotry and stupidity to unpack in that statement...

          1. Mark 110 Silver badge

            Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

            Theres been quite a lot in this thread about the "rainbow haired pronoun crowd". Not sure why. Must have been in the original article somewhere.

            Anyway, as an out of the box WASP, could I just say that anyone that says anything derogatory at work about my gay, trans, black, asian whatever colleagues gets put in their box quite quickly by me. If they don't like it they can deal with HR/union. If their work is crap its nothing to do with the colour of their skin, their gender identity, or their sexuality so why the fuck bring it up.

            Out of work I'd be much less tolerant of intolerance. My god kids are mixed race. Family members aren't straight. Watch who you are insulting.

            1. Updraft102 Silver badge

              Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

              My interpretation of "rainbow haired pronoun crowd" doesn't imply anything about bigotry against women, gays, transgenders, racial minorities, etc. Straight, white males (who identify as such) can be (and often are) part of the "rainbow haired pronoun" crowd, while a lesbian mixed-race woman often isn't. It's about the people who put identity politics and virtue signalling in front of actually making a good product (*cough* Mozilla *cough*). That's the thing-- the "rainbow haired pronoun" crowd is the most intolerant group out there. Tolerance, in their view, only flows toward people they favor, not to those they don't... and there are LOTS of people they don't favor.

              I'm all in favor of "live and let live." What kind of person you are attracted to, what you think about your physical sex, where your ancestors came from, etc., are not my concern. Are you a good person? Are you conscientious? Can I trust you? If it is a work context, are you qualified? Above all, do you do your job well?

              Notice how being a straight white male doesn't even factor into that? It doesn't. I am prepared to judge the fitness of a given worker on the basis of their work-- a meritocratic approach. The thing is, that's not what the RHPC want or work toward. They'd rather put out a shit product but have all the right kinds of people working on the sinking ship as it slips beneath the waves.

      2. Insert sadsack pun here

        Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

        "That, and it's entertaining when it hits the news."

        Ahh...so you're saying it's a feature, not a bug?

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