back to article What happens to your online accounts when you die?

What happens to the numerous user logins you've accumulated after you die or become too infirm to manipulate a keyboard? Some people have a plan, the digital equivalent of living will, or have chosen "family" option in a password management package such as LastPass or have entrusted a book of passwords to a family member. But …

Silver badge
Devil

IMHO

"That’s because you’re buying into a licence to use a thing, as opposed to buying the thing itself."

This is the Devil's work of the 21C

59
1
Anonymous Coward

America 'Fall-Of-Rome' moment:

"Americans Own Less Stuff, and That’s Reason to Be Nervous What happens when a nation built on the concept of individual property ownership starts to give that up?"

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2018-08-12/american-ownership-society-is-changing-thanks-to-technology

12
1
Silver badge

Re: America 'Fall-Of-Rome' moment:

There is an interesting bit on this on the BBC.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-44829976

Dave Lee describes how his life in the USA is virtually free from posessions.

Owning nowt means that only the mega corps will own anything. Ownership is power.

26
1
K
Silver badge

Re: IMHO

"That’s because you’re buying into a licence to use a thing, as opposed to buying the thing itself." ...

Unless you purchased it as a subscription, then that B$, the argument here ultimately exactly the same as used-games and used-DVDs.

If I have paid for a product, which has supplied a physical media or downloadable copy of content (that I can store).. then I own that particular copy of that product. In which case, upon my death, I will hand ownership of that, to whoever I please. As for digital products, such as Steam, then ownership of this account will transfer to my Kin.

9
6
Anonymous Coward

Re: IMHO

Strictly speaking, this has been the case for a long time, at least as far as software, movies and music go.

It's just that in the past they had no way of enforcing it because there was no connection between them and the item you "bought". Now...there is and they can and they will.

11
2
Bronze badge

Re: IMHO -- The Subscription Model

Microsoft and others are tired of gambling on who will upgrade. The subscription model is simply guaranteed automatic upgrade, which is effectively forced on the users--reducing the gamble for the provider and also reducing the users free market influence.

But, then I'm one of those who has been traumatized by every Windows upgrade that employers put us through.

14
1
Silver badge

Re: IMHO

If I have paid for a product, which has supplied a physical media or downloadable copy of content (that I can store).. then I own that particular copy of that product. In which case, upon my death, I will hand ownership of that, to whoever I please.

Be aware that if it's an Apple app store buy, they will absolutely NOT transfer the purchase from the deceased's account to a living person's, not even if you can produce the relevant death certificate. YMMV with Google Play.

12
1
Silver badge
Joke

What About The Pron On Your Computer?

Clip from The Man Show - cleaning up after you die for the single guy:

The Rest Assured service - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_QA7M2vQBw

"Your family will remember you by what you've left behind... when you're gone, it's too late to hide any evidence of your hedonistic lifestyle (get that goat off the bed!)"

6
1
Silver badge

Re: IMHO

"If I have paid for a product, which has supplied a physical media or downloadable copy of content (that I can store)"

The physical medium the product was supplied on you own. You own the physical medium on which you stored the download although your use of the download itself maybe defined by the terms you agreed to (possibly without reading) before the server would deign to start the download; in this case your rights to pass on the stored download might be less than you assumed. A product which is streamed is going to be subject to T&Cs which forbid you from capturing it even if DRM doesn't prevent you from physically doing so.

The T&Cs will determine whether you can legally pass any of that onto your kin or anyone else.

7
1
Silver badge

Re: America 'Fall-Of-Rome' moment:

"Americans Own Less Stuff, and That’s Reason to Be Nervous What happens when a nation built on the concept of individual property ownership starts to give that up?"

Some of the stuff the linked article lists as objects you own are ephemera - most people don't keep the newspapers or magazines they bought - today's news is tomorrow's chip wrapper. Books are more likely to be kept but personally, I'm about to send a consignment to the local charity bookshop.

Even the more solid stuff like furniture can have a finite life. Whilst the extremely solid oak bookcase we bought years ago and has been dragged after us round two countries is by now a potentially valuable antique; the Ikea bookshelves are never going to achieve that status.

The thing I really find interesting is the discussion of ultimate lack of ownership of iThings, Office 365 etc as Apple and other vendors can control the fate of them by controlling their subscription software. In contrast here I am, with my Linux kit, LibreOffice etc., all that stuff which its more extreme critics used to label communist, in undisputed private ownership of my own stuff. Does that make me a capitalist instead of a neo-feudal villein?

13
0
Silver badge

Re: America 'Fall-Of-Rome' moment:

>Owning nowt means that only the mega corps will own anything.

Yes the one thing missing from Dave Lee's piece is the monthly pay cheque that enables much of this; stop getting the monthly pay cheque and suddenly owning nothing but a whole bunch of monthly payments becomes a lot less attractive. So the subscription model helps to keep everyone busy looking out for the next pay cheque rather than watching what the mega corps are doing...

12
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: The search for the pay cheque

You make a good point.

What happens not if but when the Robot takes your job and the income stops?

You lose your job, all your stuff that your leased on the 'never never' gets taken away and you have nothing to sell to delay the inevitable 'get out of my house' eviction. Property prices will drop by 90%.

We are heading for a huge meltdown in society.

We won't have a few tens of thousands living on the streets, it will be 40%-70% (at least) of the population.

The 'have's' will zoom by in their Level 5 flying pods totally ignorant of the plight of the rest of us.

The end is nigh.

We are doomed.

The majority of the population will have no money to buy anything including food.

Vive la Revolution.

6
2
Anonymous Coward

Re: America 'Fall-Of-Rome' moment:

"iThings, Office 365 etc as Apple and other vendors can control the fate of them by controlling their subscription software. "

You seem to have omitted systemd from that list.

Others have chosen to omit systemd from their systems. And for good reason.

2
4
Pirate

Re: IMHO

"That’s because you’re buying into a licence to use a thing, as opposed to buying the thing itself."

Thats why I will not buy any music or movies that don't come with physical media. I read a while back about someone who had several thousands of pounds worth of music on iTunes and after they died a family member who tried to claim the departeds music collection was left to them, Itunes promptly informed them that the licences were not transferable and locked the account.

Its something that I tell everyone when buying music from itunes or similar.

14
0
Silver badge
Meh

Society devolving back to feudalism

Not just in America, but pretty much everywhere, we're becoming a society of tenant serfs who never really get to own anything, but only have the temporarily privilege of using things in exchange for labour. The only difference between now and the days of actual feudalism is that today this exchange is usually indirect - i.e. you work for one entity, but use the money earned from that to pay the "rental" fees for, increasingly, your entire existence - not just your home. More direct examples include prostituting yourself to advertising in exchange for "free" apps and online services, again none of which you own or have any control over (a fact that will only bother you when they pull the plug, or when they ban/demonetise/censor you for violating their arbitrary "terms").

And the primary driving force behind this devolution is intellectual monopoly. It's literally enslaving us.

This bothers me in principle, because the idea of working for nothing but the ability to pay bills is not only utterly demoralising but literally slavery. In practice it'd bother me more if I had children, because I'd be painfully aware that not only would they be born into this slavery but I'd also have nothing to bequeath them, since you can't bequeath rented property.

But as someone with no children, and frankly unlikely to ever have any, whatever little property I have will simply end up in a landfill site when I die anyway, so it's probably pointless me having any. I certainly won't be in a position to care about what happens to my digital footprint after I'm gone.

I would hope that would not apply to most people.

8
0
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Society devolving back to feudalism

"And the primary driving force behind this devolution is intellectual monopoly."

no, it's the willingness of people to surrender a part of their freedom to others, i.e. to "the elite", whether it's governments or corporations. Certain "evil" corporations are only just a PART of that, when driven by motives that are NOT "give the customer what he wants and make a profit". When it becomes "drive the customer to do what WE want, and make them PAY US FOR IT" - that's the problem.

Right, Microsoft?

6
2
Silver badge

Re: Society devolving back to feudalism

there are accounts that need to be passed on though. Think of online insurance portals, my other half is covered under my car insurance for example. Or the family annual holiday insurance. Netflix is another and so is the gas and leccy. Plenty are "in my name" for the online account but not necessarily in just my name for the ownership.

1
1
Silver badge

Re: Society devolving back to feudalism

"there are accounts that need to be passed on though. Think of online insurance portals, my other half is covered under my car insurance for example. Or the family annual holiday insurance. Netflix is another and so is the gas and leccy. Plenty are "in my name" for the online account but not necessarily in just my name for the ownership."

It's not obvious to me that car insurance, even if it covers two people, is transferable upon the death of the person who signed the contract. Unless you both signed it, which I don't think you did, because that's not how insurance normally works.

2
0
Silver badge

Re: IMHO

Thank you for the advice. Was about to try that with Apple regarding a deceased relative. They didn't event return the enquiry.

1
0

Re: IMHO

I'm not sure I see it as so much of a problem.

The world is changing fast and your kids don't like the same music/movies/games as you and generally don't want to *own* digital content in the same way older generations are interested in owning things. In fact, apart from houses and the odd sentimental keepsake, I reckon people will be increasingly less interested in inheriting things from their parents at all.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Scam

As far as I know Facebook has not extended it's reach to heaven or hell, though they probably have made good inroads to the latter.

If I got a message from a dead relative I think that I would be rather more likely to categorize it as a scam than a message from beyond the grave.

17
1
Bronze badge

Re: Scam

"If I got a message from a dead relative I think that I would be rather more likely to categorize it as a scam"

However rational you are, the insensitivity of scammers will not likely be a comfort to you. If you are like me, it will only fuel your pessimism about the future of humanity.

10
2
Silver badge

Re: Scam

However rational you are, the insensitivity of scammers will not likely be a comfort to you. If you are like me, it will only fuel your pessimism about the future of humanity.

In my case it was the insensitivity of ordinary sites that, after I asked to no longer pay the monthly charge for the product for my late wife (and said why), sent a "Please come back" plea to her email address. I was coldly polite about it (including pointing out that I had my own subscription to their service and therefore didn't need to use hers, and got an apologetic and understanding email from an actual human, and nothing further from them to Mrs Cynic's email.

The worst was Elsevier, the scientific journal publisher. It took me ages and ages to convince them to stop sending stuff, since any one "unsubscribe" unsubscribed from only that one thing.

And I already have a surfeit of pessimism about the future of humanity, thanks.

24
2
Anonymous Coward

Get a Power of Attorney

before it is too late.

I'm struggling with getting just over a £100 back from Mastercard on my Mothers account. Due to the onset of dementure, she paid her bill twice. Now and because she would not sign a power of Attorney, they won't pay the money into her bank account (at the same bank as the card issuer).

It looks like I'm going to have to wait until I have a death certificate to get the money from them.

The whole thing with situations like this and online accounts is a frigging nightmare. And it will only get worse.

21
1
Anonymous Coward

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

Sad situation, but the same a friend of mine is experiencing - his wife has Alzheimers and cannot sign anything anymore. He was able to get an attorney, a medical examiner and some friends as witness and got a Power of Attorney to sign for her. I guess this would be considerably more difficult if she has passed away.

16
1

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

When my Mother passed away, she had an account with Tesco Bank. Her brother-in-law called Tesco, but they refused to close the account because they would only talk to the account holder. When my uncle explained that the account holder was dead (he offered to send a copy of the Death Certificate), they repeated their position of only talking to the account holder and no-one else. So we asked the solicitor to talk to Tesco Bank - he got the same response!

Luckily, there was only a couple of pounds in the account, so we gave up, but the moral of the story is: It doesn't matter what position you are in (even death) - if the company doesn't want to do something - it won't!

15
3
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

Respectfully, I'm not convinced on this (IANAL). When someone dies the executors of their estate gain control of it via the process of Probate assuming they don't die intestate (i.e. without a Will) which complicates things. Once the executors have completed the process of probate they can (along with a death certificate) gain access to the affairs of the deceased (things like ownership/possessions/property/financial affairs) so they can close down their estate. This is all done in writing so I suspect the problem you faced is that you tried to do this over the phone (the solicitor should have known better). I can understand the call centre droid declining to talk to someone on the basis of "The account holder has died, honest" even if the scripted reply sounds a bit odd. On the other hand I would be quite surprised if Tesco Bank were routinely disregarding the legal process of Probate without censure, and organisations like this usually have specialist bereavement teams to deal with this process. AIUI once the executors have completed probate an organisation like Tesco Bank could only challenge their access to the accounts by challenging the probate itself (again IANAL).

26
1
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

Having had to work through things like this when my father died, and with the prospect of having to do so on my mother's demise, I can honestly say that this sort of wuckfittery is standard and normal. When someone dies, a legal process is set in motion which is constrained to follow a certain course, the steps therein being responses to age-old con tricks played to gain control of living persons' money.

So, you have to go through a series of steps to obtain a death certificate; when you do so I would strongly advise obtaining a dozen or so legal copies as this is cheaper at the time of issue rather than later. Most financial institutions will do precisely zero unless and until they get sight of a certified death certificate; this is legally mandated. Once they have a death certificate, some behave efficiently, some require prodding and some flap around like wet hens and have to be prompted every step of the way.

Once all this has gone through and you have obtained final accountings of all the deceased's assets and debts and have paid them all, then you can make a list of everything they owned and stick it on a probate form. It is the making of the list that is the difficult bit; gathering all the info is the time-consuming part of it. Actually filling the form out is dead easy, especially as the instructions and guidance are pretty much idiot-proof. Unless everything is horribly complicated or you have the IQ of an aubergine, you don't need a solicitor to hand-hold you through filling out a form.

Obtaining probate then gives you a certificate of probate. Once again, obtain a number of certified copies of this since no company will move unless they have had one of these certificates in their hands; they are legally required to act this way. They are not legally required to act like incompetent idiots who have never even heard of the concept of customers dying; this is merely part of the (dis)service that many offer.

One useful trick I found for applying boot to buttock in such cases is the Letter of Instruction, which is a letter with that wording as a title, signed by all executors, declaring who you are, what has happened, what certified proof you have and what you want to happen. Generally this gets things moving nicely.

35
1
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

@Dr Dan "I would strongly advise obtaining a dozen or so legal copies [of the death certificate]". A good post throughout but this is spot on advice. Everyone and his dog wants to see the original death certificate before lifting a finger so if you've only got one you'll be years sorting everything out. Get 10 or so copies and the paperwork become much easier to plough through.

26
1

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

What you have said is all very well provided that the executor:

- can access the deceased's password protected computer/phone/etc.;

- has or can ascertain from the PC/phone/etc. a full list of all sites on which the deceased has accounts, and means of contacting the providers of all such accounts (even when they are huge US conglomerates);

- can access the deceased's e-mail to be aware of and attend to incoming correspondence, etc.; and notify appropriate people of the death;

- etc..

I have read stories of a family who son was killed on active service, and who wanted access to his e-mails (describing his active service), photos, etc. in order to remember him - but where Yahoo refused on the grounds that email accounts were not transferable, until Yahoo lost a US Court case invoked by the family.

Also, does the deceased's Will state what they want to happen to any collections of, for example, photos, projects, research, etc. residing on the device?

Those are a few of the issues that are not readily handled by a standard probate process. There are also now a number of websites & books that do address these issues:

http://www.yourdigitalafterlife.com/

https://www.techlicious.com/how-to/how-to-manage-your-online-accounts-after-you-die/

https://www.lifewire.com/your-online-accounts-when-you-die-3486015

https://www.everplans.com/#/

https://www.hacker9.com/pass-your-online-accounts-after-death.html

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/one-simple-trick-will-share-online-account-access-death/

http://www.thedigitalbeyond.com/

https://mashable.com/2010/10/11/social-media-after-death/?europe=true#JSQhLkc6eGq9

The following comments from YouGov (https://yougov.co.uk/news/2015/04/13/widespread-confusion-over-who-owns-online-accounts/) are interesting:

"The research revealed a serious lack of understanding over who owns digital content after death. Over a third of adults online (36%) believe that Facebook own content by default after death; 20% think that next of kin inherit the content; over one in four (27%) don’t know; whilst 17% believe that no-one owns the content.

"The survey also suggests that apathy amongst digital service users may be fuelling the risks. Almost half (48%) of respondents admitted to not reading the T&Cs before opening an online account, whilst 40% admitted to not reading them and continuing to use the service when contacted about a T&Cs update. Only one in five (20%) claimed to fully understand the terms and conditions before they opened an online account.

"The research revealed that people are not sharing their digital passwords with loved ones or in their will. More than half of adults (52%) said no-one, including friends or family, would be able to access their online accounts should anything happen to them."

The issues may not be as straight-forward as you suggest.

5
1

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

Yes, many copies. Just going through this after my father' s death. The solicitor has been completely useless, HSBC's bereavement service an utter shambles, and more than one party we have had to notify have needed a second death certificate after loosing the first one.

10
1
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

"And it will only get worse."

Until we start getting nasty with them and start taking them to the small claims court and then send in the bailiffs when they ignore that.

2
1
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

"I guess this would be considerably more difficult if she has passed away."

It ought not to be as the power then automatically passes to the executor. There would, however, be a delay until probate's granted. The real problem lies in customer service scripts not having a section for dealing with probate or powers of attorney and their ISO9000 insistence on repeatability means that they repeatedly fail.

3
0
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

"if the company doesn't want to do something - it won't!"

If you're prepared to go the full legal route they will when the bailiffs go in. Especially if the bailiffs start by seizing the receptionist's PC and phone.

4
1
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

"Generally this gets things moving nicely."

But only once you get past the wet hens in customer services who have neither a script for that nor an escalation procedure.

2
1
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

"organisations like this usually have specialist bereavement teams to deal with this process"

Working there isn't likely to be a sought-after job by the organisation's brightest and best. You need to factor that into your dealings with them.

1
1

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

Sometimes people have accounts in more than one name, for example they might use a shortened version of their name, or at some point they decided they disliked their given first name and started going under their middle name or another. BEFORE you get the death certificate, check all accounts you can to see if this happened and get all names and spellings they used put on the certfificate.

3
0
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

You have clearly never had to deal with the morons who work for Tesco bank, I spent 20 minutes on the phone to them about an over fee charge that the call centre droid promised me was a mistake and I would not be charged for as their text alerts doesn't seem to bother sending me messages despite it being set up to do so. 3 weeks later the charge appears on my account along with a letter in the post, phoned up to speak to someone again and they had no record of my previous 20 minute conversation or the promise that the fee would not be charged to me and had to go through the whole thing again.

They then promised they would waive the fee and give me 25 pounds as compensation, which never showed up meaning I need to phone them AGAIN to sort it out.

3
0
Bronze badge
Boffin

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

Wouldn't a PC and phone be considered tools of the receptionist's trade?

0
0
Silver badge

Re: Get a Power of Attorney

Wouldn't a PC and phone be considered tools of the receptionist's trade?

Nah, just the handgun.

0
0
Childcatcher

My carefully curated online presence

Really?

I'm dead - don't GAF about my 'carefully curated online presence.'

And so long as none of my surviving family are simple-minded enough to fall for scams by their deceased relative, I won't have to turn in my grave with embarrassment at how anyone in my family could be that retarded.

Seriously...

Sort your finances out and any associated property matters and nothing else matters.

If you want to pass your Netflix account to someone then do so before you die (duh). If you can't because you went senile in the meantime well, you know what, we never found where my grandmother buried the gold sovereigns in the park either - life's a bitch.

*sigh*

My carefully curated online presence?

Talk about first world problems.

19
12
Silver badge

Re: My carefully curated online presence

There is the issue of occasional contacts and social groupings whom you would like, perhaps, to be advised of your death.

In t'good old days it was often a question of delving through the deceased's possessions[1] to find an address book, and then get busy on the phone/letter writing (had to do that a couple of times) but in the absence of email/whatever passwords that could become a lot mode difficult.

[1] Strictly, I don't think you have any possessions once you're dead. But I'm not a thanatalogical lawyer.

6
2
Silver badge

Re: My carefully curated online presence

Your family might GAF if accounts are used to steal someone's ID or as part of a Russian retweet campaign in the next elections.

When somebody dies, the estate should be able to download any data attached to the accounts. Now that GDPR has come along this is easier.

Next, depending on the nature of the account it could be deleted (e.g. online shopping) or left up for a period of time before being removed (e.g. social network). After deletion, the account ID shouldn't be reusable to prevent ID theft.

This is where the Internet clashes with the real world because how does an estate prove that it should have the rights to twinkletoes@hotmail.com whose address is down as Buckingham Palace.

7
1

Re: My carefully curated online presence

> the issue of occasional contacts and social groupings whom you would like, perhaps, to be advised of your death.

There is that, yes, but you can always put up an online memorial to the person in question for interested parties to find when researching whatever happened to that person they (in a completely uncharacteristic manner) haven't bothered to call for six months despite having been in regular contact for the last thirty years - and if they weren't in contact with you frequently enough for them to notice that you haven't spoken in six months and make enquiries, just how significant is it that they don't hear of your death anyway?

Besides, what about the people in ye oldene dayes who didn't keep a written contact list either? How did people resolve the issue then?

Or those who hid the key to the chest?

Or didn't mention the combination to the family safe before getting run over by a bus?

Seriously, you'd think this were a whole new class of problem that had suddenly arisen thanks to the advent of technology when it isn't - Malibu Stacey has a new hat and that's all there is to it.

Yes it could, under the right circumstances, be a serious matter if someone can't log into your online account but, no, it's not new, it's just the same old issue of your heirs not having the combination to the safe containing the deeds to the house because you never gave it to them and (sensibly) didn't write it down in a little, black book with entries like "Mistress who will need to know why I'm not paying her rent any more", "Secret gay lovers who might want to attend my funeral", "Blackmailers I'm paying not to mention my paedophile activities to anyone" or "The combination to the safe behind the rather tacky Constable Haywain print in the ugly frame on the back wall of the study on the second floor of the house."

This is all a fuss by people who really have nothing better to do than pick lint out of their navels. The problem here isn't one of technology but of information distribution and the solution is the same as it has ever been: give someone the information required to deal with whatever issues they (not you) might be confronted with upon your demise and the job's a good'un.

If you're worried about them abusing the privilege then keep a list of all your accounts/passwords with a solicitor/lawyer and update it whenever you add/delete/change account details and they can give it to your appointed next of kin upon your death.

But worrying about your 'carefully curated' online presence? Get a job!

8
2

Re: My carefully curated online presence

@Dan 55

The fuss being made about people's 'online presence'? I hate to use the term 'snowflake' (and generally don't) but seriously, in this instance, it's just first world problems for those with nothing better to worry about than what the neighbours will think of their hairdo.

The rest of your points, fine, although see my reply to Neil: this isn't a technology problem but simply the same problem that has always existed and the solution is the same as it has ever been: make sure that the necessary information will be made available to those who need it when the time comes - use a solicitor/lawyer and keep their records up to date.

But as for

> Your family might GAF if accounts are used to steal someone's ID or as part of a Russian retweet campaign in the next elections.

Talk about trying to shoehorn in some pointless prejudice. What next? Nobody had my R.S.P.C.A. account password and the E.U. destroyed some dogs as a result?

Russia has sweet FA to do with any of this but even if it did, if it really wants to steal my ID, it isn't going to wait until I'm dead.

8
9
Anonymous Coward

Re: My carefully curated online presence

"[...] a little, black book with entries like "Mistress who will need to know why I'm not paying her rent any more"

For many years an elderly neighbour would entertain me with choice details from her life. Having worked in a local legal office all her life she knew the scandals of the local high and mighty. One particular task was to facilitate the regular "anonymous" payments to what in those days were termed illegitimate children.

When she died she had left instructions for her life's collection of daily diaries to be destroyed. Her daughter decided to read them first.

In her own retirement the daughter embarked on the project by learning Pitman shorthand - which was loosely what her mother had used. She then discovered a new challenge - any reference to love affairs was in coded entries. The daughter was already privy to the general details - but eventually broke the code as well.

The daughter did make one serious faux pas after the funeral. She knew her mother had been very candid with me - so it was assumed I knew "everything". She then made a reference that was a bombshell. Oops! I didn't know that one - even though I should have guessed from the facts I had already.

9
1

Re: My carefully curated online presence

> She then made a reference that was a bombshell. Oops! I didn't know that one - even though I should have guessed from the facts I had already.

Eva Braun secretly had Hitler's love-child without his knowledge and you are its grandchild?

8
1
Silver badge

Re: My carefully curated online presence

Eva Braun secretly had Hitler's love-child without his knowledge and you ate its grandchild?

is how I read that - even more 'US' tabloid than the intended 'Sunday Sport' one.

4
1
Anonymous Coward

Re: I'm dead - don't GAF about my 'carefully curated online presence.'

A colleague passed away in 2011. Some miscreants got hold of his username/password for Skype some time ago and sent several spam messages (with a bit.ly shortened URL, if I recall) from his account.

It was sort of amusing, since one the senior managers that worked together with him got very upset about receiving a message from a colleague that died years ago, and asked for our Evil IT Team for support. We suggested him to get his computer exorcised. That's what our deceased friend, a well-known prankster, would have wanted.

5
2

Re: My carefully curated online presence

Your comments: "Sort your finances out and any associated property matters and nothing else matters. If you want to pass your Netflix account to someone then do so before you die (duh)." rather assume that you are aware of your imminent death. What about the many people who die suddenly and unexpectedly?

6
4

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018