back to article Kepler finds three Earth-sized exoplanets, but they're too hot to handle

Astro-boffins poring over data from Kepler's K2 mission have spotted two new solar systems, one of them sporting three planets roughly the same size as Earth. The bad news is that all the latest discoveries are likely too hot for us, with temperatures between 100°C and 327°C. Announcing the results in a paper in the Monthly …

"K-239 is about 160 light years away" Experiments keep confirming Einsteinian Relativity, so since it's all down to the observer, K-239 is roughly twice to Earth as close as Europe is to NZ (cattle class, of course)

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And still no messages from the stars....

Again this helps provide actual data for the Drake Equation (discounting the fact the search method does skew things in favor of gas giants).

So thumbs up for that.

Although the Fermi Paradox remains as paradoxical as ever.

Now all we need is the FTL/deep hibernation transport system to go there.

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Re: And still no messages from the stars....

I'm still waiting for a research physicist looking for his missing socks in the laundry to discover wormhole technology. Hibernation is no good for me , I always wake up in a bad mood.

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Re: And still no messages from the stars....

@John Smith 19

"Although the Fermi Paradox remains as paradoxical as ever."

"Now all we need is the FTL/deep hibernation transport system to go there."

Your second line is one reason why the Fermi paradox might not be a paradox (i.e. long distance space travel may be very difficult / not worth the effort)

.. alternatively if a civilization has mastered space travel, then maybe they have plenty of technology meaning they can "cloak" from our puny tech or study us from huge distances without us being aware.

I could go on, lots more reasons why it might not be much of a paradox (if human belligerence anything to go by, big destructive wars trashing your civilization such that it never reaches such heights again is a possibility - as a lot of stuff is "one shot" - on next go after calamity the low hanging fruit of easy fossil fuels etc. that make advances "easy" are probably long since gone, harvested in earlier civilization rise)

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Re: And still no messages from the stars....

'on next go after calamity the low hanging fruit of easy fossil fuels etc. that make advances "easy" are probably long since gone, harvested in earlier civilization rise)'

If there's a long enough pause between the civilizations, the earlier one becomes the fossil fuels for the next. The rest of the fossils might be a clue to the future archaeologists that something went horribly wrong last go around, perhaps they should be more careful this time?

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Re: And still no messages from the stars....

"If there's a long enough pause between the civilizations, the earlier one becomes the fossil fuels for the next. The rest of the fossils might be a clue to the future archaeologists that something went horribly wrong last go around, perhaps they should be more careful this time?"

Maybe that's what happened to the Dinosaurs? And we are just too arrogant to admit it?

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Re: And still no messages from the stars....

Hence Pterry's dinosaur with a placard reading "End Nuclear Testing Now"

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Windows

Re: And still no messages from the stars....

@tiggity:

if human belligerence anything to go by, big destructive wars trashing your civilization such that it never reaches such heights again is a possibility - as a lot of stuff is "one shot" - on next go after calamity the low hanging fruit of easy fossil fuels etc. that make advances "easy" are probably long since gone, harvested in earlier civilization rise

Museums. Make them temples. The moties had the right idea.

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If either of those places don't have venomous spiders or giant rats that will punch you, they sound like an upgrade on Australia.

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Bah!

I renew my objection, M'lud, that if Pluto is not a planet because it "has not cleared its own orbit", and if, as is indisputably the case, we cannot determine by the current state of the art in telescopy whether or not these so-called "exo-planets" have cleared their orbits, we must regrettably deny them the appellation "planets" by the rules established by the likes of Mr deGrasse Tyson, considered an expert on matters of orbiting body classification those who care about orbit-clearing.

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Too hot for us

But not necessarily too hot for life. I wasn't aware the Kepler was searching for future homes for humans...

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Re: Too hot for us

It's not, it's looking for future vacation spots for Elon Musk.

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Holmes

"She turned me into a NYT"

Even if they weren't far too hot for us, distance would rule out the planets as destinations for rich people leaving “this wretched planet” (as the New York Times put it)

Ah, the New York Times.

They will be moaning about the utter lack of diversity on the space station and condemning implicit racism from above and why can't black people get affirmative space action?

(Unless it's a space station from that Mel Gibson movie, then uniformity is needed to attain universal balance because ... you know ... reparations ... and Trump)

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Joke

Combustion point for beach towels

If there was any chance of pools of liquid water, you can bet the Germans have already put out their towels.

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Re: Combustion point for beach towels

With the correct aiming method the British can use the 'Bouncing towel' to get their towels across the pool in front of the Germans:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuIJqF8av6I

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