back to article Boss sent overpaid IT know-nothings home – until an ON switch proved elusive

Why look at that! The end of the working week is upon us, which means it’s time to dip into the mailbag to bring you another instalment of On-Call, The Register’s reader-contributed tales of tech support trauma. This week meet “Abraham” who was once “called in to move a big printer.” Abraham was a proper techie, not a …

Page:

  1. GlenP Silver badge

    Way Back...

    I'm not sure whether power sockets on PSUs just weren't very good but slightly unplugged power cables weren't that unusual. As first (and second and third, small company) line 'phone support you'd go through the rigmarole, including asking them to unplug the power lead and plug it back in, then if that failed try a different lead. We'd also warn them that if an engineer was called and it turned out to just be an unplugged lead they would be charged. It's amazing how often the engineers found the power cables almost hanging out of the sockets.

    The software I was supporting was sensitive to unexpected power downs. I had one user insisting that no, there was no way the computer had been turned off, however the symptoms said otherwise. An hour or so later I had an apologetic phone call, her boss had accidentally turned the computer off and switched it back on hoping nobody would notice*!

    *No logins on PCs in those days, they were set up to boot straight in to the software.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Way Back...

      yep, still happens daily!

    2. JimboSmith Silver badge
      FAIL

      Re: Way Back...

      Yeah I had at least a couple of clients who either had "no need" or a lack of understanding regarding power cables/power switch. The "best" client I remember from back when I was freelance had a new computer in their home office. I was asked to go round and set everything up including the scanner, router, mouse etc. I was also asked to install some software. Almost finished I told them that I was going to go for a very late lunch and when I got back I'd finish everything. Just reached the local sandwich shop and I had a text "the computer isn't working get back immediately." I returned with some haste and discovered that the computer was working fine no issue with that. They were unable to use the Internet though and the router on the other hand was now devoid of any lights, it had been functioning fine before I left.

      It was still plugged in so the mystery deepened. After a few minutes I asked if they'd changed anything because I couldn't find the fault. Denials all round and much complaining whilst I'm told that the power obviously isn't an issue because the light is plugged into the other socket. To demonstrate this point as it was starting to get darker outside someone flicked one of the the light switches by the door. The desk lamp came on and the router also sprang back into life, it dawned on me that the power socket was controlled by the light switch. Amazingly no one had thought to mention the fact that that double socket was independently controlled by the light switch before. They found it much easier and they were far more comfortable just blaming me. "I wasn't aware it needed electricity though you never mentioned that." I was given an apology and lunch with drinks in the local pub.

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Way Back...

        "I was given an apology and lunch with drinks in the local pub."

        The power socket controlled by a light switch? I might have gone to the pub for lunch and drinks but not gone back to the house afterwards.

        1. Stevie Silver badge

          Re: Way Back...

          This is required in New York by code. At least one socket must be controlled by a switch in each room because there is no requirement that the room be fitted with light fixtures.

          You guys need to get out more.

          1. Jean Le PHARMACIEN

            Re: Way Back...

            I have one of these sockets in my house in France...no 'New York code' involved though (Statue of Liberty excluded)

            Unfortunately said socket is under the stairs furthest away from where any sane person would put ..say a lamp (nearest socket for that is ..er.. not 'room switch controlled) . It is, however, very conveniently close to my UPS / Comms cabinet. Needless to say there is a long cable top a lamp standard and an equally long cable in the opposite direction feeding the the UPS ('onduleur') ...

            "Vive La France!"

            1. macjules Silver badge

              Re: Way Back...

              Urgh, French electrics. There does not seem to be any standards for wire colouring in France at all: I have regularly changed light switches or power sockets only to find that the Blue wire is Live and the red wire is Earth, or the black wire is Neutral and the green wire is Live.

              As they say, "Vive la Différence"

              1. Piro

                Re: Way Back...

                I'm always surprised to see how relatively poor installations are in the rest of Europe compared to the UK. Odd.

          2. Alan Brown Silver badge

            Re: Way Back...

            "This is required in New York by code."

            It's relatively common in the USA and rare as rocking-horse shit in the rest of the world.

            1. Soruk

              Re: Way Back...

              The opposite is quite common in China. Sockets with switches, where the socket is permanently live and the switch operates a light.

              Of course, the socket can be wired through the switch, but it's not guaranteed, even varying from socket to socket in the same house.

            2. Stork Bronze badge

              Re: Way Back...

              Not that rare. I have come across it in Portugal

          3. Cpt Blue Bear

            Re: Way Back...

            "This is required in New York by code. At least one socket must be controlled by a switch in each room because there is no requirement that the room be fitted with light fixtures."

            Aha!

            Thank you for solving a mystery that has been with me for 20 years. Coming from Oz, where every mains socket has to have its own switch, I had assumed it was a cheapskate measure to save a few bucks on switches. If it had been in a private home rather than a hotel I would have assumed it was the work of an amateur electrician (my Grandad was one and not one light switch in his house worked as expected).

        2. JimboSmith Silver badge

          Re: Way Back...

          The power socket controlled by a light switch? I might have gone to the pub for lunch and drinks but not gone back to the house afterwards.

          There's nothing wrong with a socket controlled by a light switch I've got a lighting circuit in my living room that does just that. In this case it was intended to be used for the desk lamps and not kit that was supposed to stay on. Had I known that beforehand I wouldn't have used that socket.

          1. TRT Silver badge

            Re: Way Back...

            That's why they still sell the 5amp round pin sockets and plugs in the UK. Makes it obvious that it's NOT a regular power outlet.

            1. Harman Mogul

              Re: Way Back...

              Yup, got some of them in my home

            2. Alan Brown Silver badge

              Re: Way Back...

              " Makes it obvious that it's NOT a regular power outlet."

              That's the rub. If there was a regulation colour for these sockets, or even if someone had the foresight to _label_ them a lot of angst would be saved.

              On a slightly larger scale version of this, about 25 years ago I solved a similar problem which had been flummoxing our staff for years. A site was reporting critical equipment (radio-operated phone system long before the days of mobiles) failing over the weekend and when we got out on site it was always working perfectly. As it was a safety requirement needed to talk between the customer's base and ships anchored about a mile offshore taking their bulk product (titanium ore) it was causing major problems and the faults were becoming more frequent.

              The site was about 100 miles from base, so callouts were difficult and the customer wasn't willing to pay callout charges in any case for what they felt was our problem.

              One friday evening, I'd finished late at a remote site about 200 miles from base and was heading home when a call came in that this site had just reported a fault and as i was about to pass it, would I call in and see what's up?

              Late on a summer's night (10pm sunset) is spooky on an ironsands mining barge when everything's shut down, but once on board I made my way to our equipment cabinet to find what was apparently a power supply failure. 5 minutes of prodding and poking later established that the dedicated socket installed and labelled for the equipment ("Do not turn off at any time") was dead and further prodding/tracing revealed that the socket was wired back to the "Non-essential" power cabinet - and had been since our equipment was installed 20 years earlier.

              Guess what happened at 5:30pm every night? The hint's in the name "Non-essential power"

              Thankfully there was a live socket about 2 metres away, so phone service to the ship visible on the horizon was quickly reestablished. The following week someone went out and replaced the lead-acid battery in our cabinet which proved to be thoroughly trashed. 20 years of being discharged overnight every night and deep discharged every weekend/public holiday had taken its toll and it was lasting about 15-20 minutes at best. I don't know if the dedicated socket was ever rewired to the correct power cabinet or whether the short extension cable to the essential outlet was left in place.

              Checking the installation documentation it was clear that the customer had signed off on the requirement that our kit was on an "essential" power feed and that over the years they'd verified it wasn't connected to the non-essential power when we asked them to double check. (The plug was labelled as "essential power, do not switch off", but the circuit label on the socket was in site convention for their non-essential stuff(*) and we verified it actually went back to the breaker it said it did)

              (*) Site caretaker electrician "That's a non-essential circuit designation, they get switched off at 5:30" - to which my response was "It's supposed to be on essential power, we're going to have to verify this"

              The customer got a report. They still complained about the length of time that it'd taken to diagnose the fault, despite the fact that due to the nature of the power "failure" (and the responses of their supposedly qualified day electricians) the problem could only have ever been diagnosed onsite at the time it was happening. I was the first out-of-hours visitor _ever_ and they'd been the ones to refuse out of hours callouts due to the charges they'd incur. The only reason I was there was because they called it in whilst someone was still in the office _and_ someone was in the area who knew the site (it was regarded as dangerous due to the bailey bridge used to access the barge, so going there needed a familiarisation trip) and it had such a long and frustrating history of "no fault found".

              1. jake Silver badge

                Re: Way Back...

                "about 25 years ago (radio-operated phone system long before the days of mobiles)"

                My DynaTAC is a couple months shy of its 35th birthday.

                (No, I didn't purchase it new. The company I worked for did. About 8 of us were presented with one, and a couple spare batteries/chargers, and told that we were to stay connected 24/7 ... at which point we all said "more money, please". With threats of quitting en masse. The company finally agreed, and we were compensated the princely sum of $1.75 for each hour of "out of the office" on-call hours. Doesn't sound like a lot today, but in 1985 $11K/yr wasn't chump-change. Especially for essentially doing nothing. I was allowed to keep the thing when the company "retired" them a couple of years later.)

                1. Alan Brown Silver badge

                  Re: Way Back...

                  > "about 25 years ago (radio-operated phone system long before the days of mobiles)"

                  >

                  > My DynaTAC is a couple months shy of its 35th birthday.

                  You missed the part further down where I explained it'd been installed for 20 years.

                  At the time I finally diagnosed it, mobile service in that country had only been up and running for about 5 years and only in major cities. As soon as it activated in the area (about 6 months after my visit - the site visit I was coming back from at the time was part of commissioning the AMPS system), the old clunky single channel VHF phone system was dumped and the ships were given mobiles.

                  Thinking back, it was '88-89, so closer to 30 years than 25.

              2. jake Silver badge

                Re: Way Back...

                "If there was a regulation colour for these sockets, or even if someone had the foresight to _label_ them a lot of angst would be saved."

                The switched plug(s) is/are supposed to be mounted upside down. Easy to see in a 3-prong (grounded) socket, but a trifle harder to notice in a 2-prong polarized socket.

                1. albegadeep

                  Re: Way Back...

                  "The switched plug(s) is/are supposed to be mounted upside down."

                  Where do they do that? In my part of the US, there's no rule about which way is up! Most houses '90 and older are smiley-face orientation for all outlets (ground pin down), but more recent ones are sometimes ground-pin-up. Wiring the garage, I specifically researched this topic; apparently it's electrician's preference here. Switched outlets are not uncommon, are almost never marked, and can be either both outlets switched or just one.

                2. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

                  Re: Way Back...

                  The switched plug(s) is/are supposed to be mounted upside down.

                  Citation? My code books don't agree. Admittedly, they're somewhat old, and (in the US) local codes often supersede the National Electric Code1, but I've never heard of this rule.

                  One book I have, Wiring under the National Electric Code, suggests that electricians often wire grounded outlets with the ground pin at the top so that if a plug is not fully seated and something (e.g. a loose metal box cover) drops onto the pins, it will rest on the ground pin and not come into contact with the hot. That situation seems unlikely to me, but not impossible. In any case, the author was unable to find any other argument in favor of the practice, except legend and custom.

                  Conversely, I've seen licensed electricians recommending that switched outlets be marked by writing "S" on them in permanent marker (between the holes), which rather suggests that there is no code-sanctioned way of indicating them.

                  1Which isn't "national" in any sense except that it's promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association, a private trade body. It's widely adopted by state and municipal jurisdictions in the US, though, albeit with variations.

            3. Martin-73 Silver badge

              Re: Way Back...

              Originally they used the 2 amp ones, each estimated as 1/2 amp draw (2x60w bulbs at 240v) so you were allowed 10 of them on a 5 amp circuit... That was back in the 40s.

              Have been bitten by the outlet switched by the lightswitch rigmarole in the US before.... using the same outlets for both is bloody minded. They could at least LABEL them

              1. Dodgy Geezer Silver badge

                Re: Way Back...

                Congratulations!!

                I thought that few people could beat my 'old fogey' rants of 'This is how we used to do it in the '50s (very late 50s!).

                But to have someone referencing the 1940s...... Well Done!!!

              2. Alan Brown Silver badge

                Re: Way Back...

                "using the same outlets for both is bloody minded."

                I've run into US double wall outlets outlets where one is on the light switch and one is not.

                Talk about mindfuckery.

                1. Fatman Silver badge

                  Re: Way Back...

                  <quote>Talk about mindfuckery.</quote>

                  Once, back some 30 years ago when I was a sparky, I was wiring a custom built home, and the owner wanted to ability to convert any bedroom outlet into a 'switched one'.

                  My helper (assistant) stated that it can't be done.

                  I knew better, and told that yoof to pay attention.

                  From the wall switch, I ran a 3 wire (plus ground - earth for you on the other side of the pond) from the swicth to the first outlet, and then from there looping to each outlet in the room. In the USofA, three wire cable colors are green - ground (earth), white - neutral, black (usually the """hot""" wire) and red - which is what I used for the switched outlet. I then called in the owners and laid it out for them. All outlets get both the green and white wires, the green one going to the green terminal on the outlet, and the white one to the silver terminal. Now, if you want the entire outlet hot, connect the black wire to the brass colored terminal and cap off the red; if you want the entire outlet switched, then connect the red wire to the brass colored terminal and cap off the black.

                  Only if you want one half hot and the other half switched, must you break the tab that joins the two halves together, and put the black one on the half you want hot all of the time, and the red on the half that you want switched. Each outlet can be set up independently of the others, but all switched outlets are controlled by the wall switch. I even drew a diagram for them.

                  Yoof was impressed. He had only seen the way switch controlled outlets were done with running a two wire cable from the switched outlet to the wall switch (one of the two wires being hot and the other one being the switched return.

                  For his education, I made him pay for drinks on the way home.

                  1. Stevie Silver badge

                    Re: In the USofA, three wire cable colors are

                    green - ground (earth), white - neutral, black (usually the """hot""" wire) and red

                    Maybe in *your* part of the USA.

                    In mine they are white, red, black and unclad (ooer missus).

                    For them out of the know one uses such wire to cable an electric cooker. The electric supply to the house is on two "phases" - sides of a center tapped pole-pig in reality, call 'em "up" and "down". Your breaker box has twin lines of breakers (or places to put them) and they alternate up-down-up-down as you descend each line (in NY). A 220v breaker straddles two slots. Your unclad/green wire goes to the box frame as your ground. Your white goes to the center tap as your "neutral" (NY code does not use the term) and the red and black are connected to the up and down live. So now you have red-black giving you 220v to power the burners, and black-white giving you the 110v for the oven light.

                    Unless you have bought your house from a miserable bodger who used three (aka four) wire cable for two (aka three) wire cable jobs, which means every wiring job is a voyage of discovery and pants wetting as you try and figure out whether the red wire is actually doing a) anything and 2) what it was color coded for.

                    Many years ago I was going to surprise my wife by installing a laundry room while she was visiting friends for a few days. I read the code carefully (being from the UK I was confident but properly nervous about differences in taming-the-volts approach). "Every grounding electrode must have its own space in the ground connector bar" it said. I opened the breaker box, unfastened the breaker panel and swung it out, and a rat's nest of wire tumbled out at me. Clearly the last electrician to muck about in there had been lax about code best practices. But there was worse horror to come.

                    Once the dangly wires were all dragged out of theater, I could see the ground bar, with every position crammed with three or four wires under the securing screws. Luckily I had a spare bar and room on the mount to install it, but I still ended up having to leave some wires sharing - albeit only two wires per position.

                    Feeling good about having made things better I looked closely at the wire tangle, and then saw that there was a red wire just dangling free. So I spent an afternoon confirming that Mr Sparksen-Flashen had just used the wrong cable type for the job at hand and the red wire hadn't simply snapped off its breaker with age/poor installation procedures.

                    Then I moved a breaker and I don't want to talk about the chaos that caused any more.

                2. Jtom Bronze badge

                  Re: Way Back...

                  Not unusual. My living room has two of them. The switched sockets are for table lamps, while they unswitched halves are for clocks, TVs, whatever. They are a pain to work on, though, and you need to make sure power is off to both halves before tinkering with them.

                  The switches, themselves, come made so you can have separate powering to each socket.

                3. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

                  Re: Way Back...

                  I've run into US double wall outlets outlets where one is on the light switch and one is not.

                  Quite common. Standard duplex receptacles in the US have breakaway bridge tabs between the two outlets so that they can be separated and wired individually, for just this purpose.

                  Many electricians frown on it, but code allows it, at least the last I checked.

            4. Martin an gof Silver badge

              Re: Way Back...

              That's why they still sell the 5amp round pin sockets and plugs in the UK. Makes it obvious that it's NOT a regular power outlet.

              Yes, the expectation of many people (in the UK) that you can draw 2x13A from a double socket(*) and I bet it'd not be long before someone plugged a heater into a socket designed for a lamp and running from the lighting circuit. I realise that some other countries don't traditionally have separate lighting and power circuits in a room.

              It's also quite easy to see some DIY dimwit deciding to use a light switch in the standard sockets circuit which (again, in the UK) will be fused at a minimum of 16A, quite possibly 20A or 32A (if a ring). Light switches in the UK are rated to 10 Amps at best and some cheaper ones are still 6A only (10A as "normal" has only really happened in the last few years).

              M.

              (*)It's a common misconception that you can't draw the full 26A from a double socket, usually explained as being a limitation in the design of the socket itself. On a 32A circuit it is eminently possible to draw 26A and unless it's a very cheap brand you shouldn't have any problems. There are three considerations though. Firstly, if the socket is on an "unfused spur" from a 32A ring circuit, it will be run using the same 2.5mm2 cable, which is only good for 27A under ideal installation circumstances and could have a capacity of 20A under some installation conditions. Secondly, the design of a ring circuit relies to a large extent on current flowing both ways around the ring. If the ring is large and the socket in question is closer to one "end" than the other, this may not be the case and it's possible to overload the shorter arm of the ring.

              Lastly, 16A / 20A radial circuits are common even in the UK :-)

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: Way Back...

                As a new sysadmin at a site I found several servers in a rack running from two 4-gangs in series which was quickly replaced. Before I shut down I first had to repair the backups. The power down was quite nerve racking.

    3. Alan Brown Silver badge

      Re: Way Back...

      "slightly unplugged power cables weren't that unusual."

      Not just on PeeCees and still a thing today.

      Supposedly technically competent users (even actual technicians) put them in so they're (barely) working and don't give them a good hard shove to get that last 3-5mm home. Result being an intermittent connection.

    4. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Devil

      Re: Way Back...

      RE: light switch on a power outlet...

      On a related note, the old 'National Technical Schools' TV repair correspondence course included some basic notes on house calls. In that chapter they pretty much pointed out that (more often than not) the TV will get unplugged so that someone can plug in a vacuum cleaner, and then be 'left that way' followed by a house call of "my TV is broken". This apparently happened so often that TV repair people basically needed to impose a 'minimum charge' just to show up or they'd invariably be giving time away for 'yet another pointless house call'.

      Additionally, the U.S. Navy Electronics Technician school has you always begin your troubleshooting by making sure the equipment is correctly powered up by examining the input fuses [which light up when the fuse blows] and making sure that the "O.N./O.F.F." switch is in the "O.N." position (and the equipment is plugged in and the outlet energized, if that is part of the equation). Because "power supply" is one of the most common reasons for failure. [they also had you basically 'play with the equipment' and put it into 'test mode' and observe what happens before opening up and doing measurements, etc. because in a lot of cases, doing 'test mode' like that narrows the cause of the problem pretty fast].

      1. JohnBoyNC

        Re: Way Back...

        US Navy ET (Electronics Technician) school (and BE&E prior to--that's Basic Electronics and Electricity training) have stood me in good stead over the years.

        It still pisses off the Missus when I ask her "is it plugged in/turned on?" after 44 yrs of marriage. And she still thinks it's lame that I ask her "when's the last time your PC/laptop/tablet/phone was rebooted?" when the object is acting flaky.

        Non-techies have no idea how many times those two questions (and their answers) magically fixes things.

  2. Tom Watson 1

    Happy Endings at work

    Are frowned upon in Asia

    1. Symon Silver badge
      Coffee/keyboard

      Re: Happy Endings at work

      Not just Asia.

      https://youtu.be/VKH9ECC_Qa4

      Mildly NSFW.

    2. wolfetone Silver badge

      Re: Happy Endings at work

      They're also frowned upon by me in Prague, when you go in to a massage parlour as a teen and you've no idea what a "happy ending" is.

      Imagine my surprise when the lovely masseuse started massaging part of my anatomy that I didn't know could be massaged in such a prim and proper establishment.

      1. frank ly Silver badge

        Re: Happy Endings at work

        When she asked you why the juice wasn't flowing, did you tell her to plug it in?

    3. JimboSmith Silver badge
      Gimp

      Re: Happy Endings at work

      On a trip to Poland I sat next to a nervous flyer who explained this to me in great detail. He said on one business trip elsewhere he'd had a longer flight ahead of him. A friend had suggested getting a massage once he arrived to get rid of some of the tension. So he'd asked a colleague who knew the city well if he knew of a masseuse who visited hotels. Needless to say the lady who turned up offered "other services" with "Happy Endings" and the hotel security didn't think very much of her. When he found out he he was very embarrassed having to explain that he really only wanted a massage. The hotel had a masseuse in their Spa who as well as being cheaper was also qualified. He hired her and felt both the tension and embarrassment melt away.

      Said he gave his happily married colleague some funny looks when he got back.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

    Reminds me of a similar situation. Basically, the angry client rolled over the vital Ethernet patch cable with his office chair. The cable defect resulted in weird packet loss, but "almost everything worked" - "only your HTTPS site doesn't work". Everyone was accused, and in the end after days of checking and debugging all software, hardware and infrastructure, the slightly defective cable was found and replaced.

    1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

      Why was a patch cable unprotected in a situation where it could be rolled over - or tripped over? Sometimes elfin safety have a point.

      1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

        Re: Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

        elfin safety have a point

        Especially in an ork-place.

        (And it's usually lots of small, fast-moving points. Attached to wooden sticks and propelled by a device incorporating wood and some exotic string..)

        1. Stevie Silver badge

          Re: Especially in an ork-place.

          That's warg place. At least round here it is.

        2. Alan Brown Silver badge

          Re: Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

          "Especially in an ork-place."

          You have to watch the elfins around the Cow-orkers

      2. ecofeco Silver badge

        Re: Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

        Why was a patch cable unprotected in a situation where it could be rolled over - or tripped over?

        Because often IT has no control over facilities or someone's personal office or very bad building design such as one port on the wrong wall 15ft away behind something heavy and awkward and no budget for proper cable and covers.

        1. Trygve Henriksen

          Re: Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

          That's what Hot-melt glue and duct tape is for...

      3. Tom 7 Silver badge

        Re: Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

        Elfin safety often dont work in Grade1 listed buildings which are lovely to work in but near impossible to add ducting too, both legally and physically. I worked in one 14thC place where you could just about get the cable down the gap between the oak floorboards but a couple of foot were on the floor and we had to cut the lever thingy off the etherrnet plug so it would come out easily rather than send the tripee flying. We tried those cable covers your can get but they just flipped the wheelie chairs during races and getting things from the printer without getting up.

        1. J.G.Harston Silver badge

          Re: Angry client rolled over the Ethernet patch cable with his office chair

          I worked in an Listed Building and we used sticky pad clippy things to "clip" the network cables along unintrusive bits of wall. The electrics, however, had been put in about 50 years before it was listed.

  4. Mycho Silver badge

    Why to be patient with idiots

    There is no point getting upset over somebody who is inevitably going to kick his own arse through sheer stupidity before long.

    Much better to stay calm and eat out on the stories.

  5. Francis Boyle Silver badge

    Was the boss Billy Connoly?

    Because if it was he got one of his best routines out of it.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "The manager had formed that opinion after reading consumer technology magazines that left him convinced that he knew all about IT and that pros knew far too little to justify their pay packets. Or even their existence."

    Do many times did I notice this behaviour ... Yet, every time, those people end up changing their opinions ... or at least, be ridiculous about it ...

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019