back to article Junk food meets junk money: KFC starts selling Bitcoin Bucket

KFC’s Canadian wing has started selling chicken for Bitcoin. The artery-clogging Bitcoin Bucket “Includes 10 Original Recipe Tenders, Waffle Fries, Med Side, Med Gravy and 2 Dips,” at a cost of however many Bitcoin equates to CA$20. KFC Canada’s page for the promotion helpfully includes live updates of that sum in Bitcoin. …

  1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

    the Facebook page announcing the deal has gone viral. Just like KFC does if undercooked.

    That would be bacterial surely. A new and improved form of "viral" marketing - with extra vomit.

  2. AMBxx Silver badge
    Devil

    >>That would be bacterial surely

    Not with the current flu epidemic. It only takes on sneeze...

  3. katrinab Silver badge

    "the Facebook page announcing the deal has gone viral. Just like KFC does if undercooked."

    Or, just like their kitchens. The Environmental Health Department has shut down two of them near me for having filthy kitchens

  4. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    Oh the irony

    This article is dripping with irony just like the chicken drips with grease.

    Delicious to read.

    On the other hand, I learned something : it costs $50 to make a Bitcoin transaction. Well if it cost me that much to use my Visa I'd be using cash all the time.

  5. MonkeyCee Silver badge

    Re: Oh the irony

    "On the other hand, I learned something : it costs $50 to make a Bitcoin transaction. "

    While I appreciate the point the author is making, that statement is pretty much bollocks.

    https://bitcoinfees.info/ will give you a rough estimate, which is about $20 for a rapid transaction. Maybe $10-12 for a slow one. You can make it effectively less if you have multiple transactions to complete at once, since you can do multiple input/output for a single transaction fee.

    In general I assume that paying for anything less than a tenner with bitcoin would be a bit bonkers. There's (quite literally) thousands of other crypto currencies that are much better suited to micro transactions, both on speed and cost. Plus services that allow you to pay in one coin and have the receiver get their desired coin.

    Why the hell KFC can't offer a payment provider that accepts that, which would actually be useful, rather than a pointless headline grabbing.... oh wait, that's why.

  6. Elmer Phud Silver badge

    Re: Oh the irony

    "In general I assume"

    Bless

  7. Cuddles Silver badge

    Re: Oh the irony

    "about $20 for a rapid transaction. Maybe $10-12 for a slow one."

    Is that supposed to be better? People are generally used to having transaction fees of $0. Even when using cards which technically have a fee, that's usually eaten by the retailer and not actually passed on to the customer (at least not directly). Complaining that a fee of $50 is "bollocks" because it really only costs $20 is rather missing the point that it costs $20 extra just to order a takeaway.

    "There's (quite literally) thousands of other crypto currencies that are much better suited to micro transactions, both on speed and cost... Why the hell KFC can't offer a payment provider that accepts that"

    Cash, Visa, Mastercard, probably a variety of other payment providers depending on location. They accept all kinds of payments that process essentially instantly and don't cost significantly more than the transaction itself in additional fees. What they don't offer is options for all the thousands of fake moneys, because they're not complete idiots.

  8. Claus Møller

    Re: Oh the irony

    So only 20$ in order to "cut out the 3rd party middleman".

    I still haven't figured out why it isn't easier to stick with the middleman. And pay instantly and without any additional costs using my traditional bank payment card and traditional money.

    Maybe I am moronic. But I still haven't seen the point in bitcoins as "money".

  9. handleoclast Silver badge

    Re: Oh the irony

    On the other hand, I learned something : it costs $50 to make a Bitcoin transaction. Well if it cost me that much to use my Visa I'd be using cash all the time.

    KFC could switch to only accepting payment in Bitcoin and the Bitcoin transaction fee could rise to £1,000,000 and it wouldn't make the slightest difference to the amount of KFC I consume.

  10. Desgrippes

    Re: Oh the irony

    If you are paying 50$ you're being mugged. All the same, It is too high right now but new solutions such as Lightning is jut round the corner and there are also viable alternatives that are inexpensive to send such as Litecoin or Bitcoin Cash.

  11. andyp-random-number

    KFC going down hill...

    It seems KFC are getting desperate to make money....may be I'm not the only one that craves for their product to go back to the early days when you picked up a piece of chicken and grease ran down your arms and fell off of your elbow. mmmmmm food.

    They were the days :)

  12. Mark 85 Silver badge

    Re: KFC going down hill...

    What? Go back to the original recipe? The flavor? The grease? I would in a minute. After the Colonel sold the business, he began bad mouthing the new owners for f***ing things up. The chain just keeps sliding downhill....

  13. EarthDog Bronze badge

    Re: KFC going down hill...

    peeling the skin off....

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    You have to wait 100 minutes for a bucket? There's something that rhymes with that.

  15. AndyS

    Truck kit?

  16. jake Silver badge

    Truck hat.

  17. veti Silver badge

    Bouquet?

  18. jake Silver badge

    In 100 minutes ...

    ... one can fry their own. Easily. And a hell of a lot cheaper. Probably healthier. And still have time to do the clean-up.

  19. Kane Silver badge

    Re: In 100 minutes ...

    "... one can fry their own. Easily. And a hell of a lot cheaper. Probably healthier. And still have time to do the clean-up."

    Whilst I agree with you, and also as someone who makes their own fried chicken, the point is it's not me doing it. This is the price we pay for convenience.

  20. whatsyourShtoile

    Re: In 100 minutes ...

    100 minutes is enough time for the fire department to take your burnt out body to the morgue after you put too much chicken in the oil.

    You can't make your own KFC gravy, as that is made from the drippings of thousands of fried chickens.

  21. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Re: In 100 minutes ...

    drippings of thousands of fried chickens.

    I'm salivating now.

  22. jake Silver badge

    Re: In 100 minutes ...

    "100 minutes is enough time for the fire department to take your burnt out body to the morgue after you put too much chicken in the oil."

    No, that's not how it works at all, as millions of home cooks world-wide prove every day. Suggestion: Learn to cook. It'll do you a world of good.

    "You can't make your own KFC gravy"

    I wouldn't if I could. Tasted it once. Once. Never again. Awful, awful stuff.

    "as that is made from the drippings of thousands of fried chickens."

    So make it yourself. After frying your bird, drain most of the grease, less about a tablespoon (15ml), out of the frying container. Leave the brown crunchy bits (BCBs, or "fond" if you're classically trained). Over medium heat, add about the same amount of flour[0] as there is grease. Stir it in for a couple minutes to remove the raw flavo(u)r from the flour. Add about a cup of milk[1] slowly, stirring constantly to dissolve the BCBs. Bring to a strong simmer/low boil and adjust consistency to suit yourself. Salt & pepper to taste. A little bit of your favo(u)rite herb from the garden at the end will impress your significant other; I usually go all traditional & add thyme with a hint of sage.

    HTH.

    [0] I use AP, my grandmother swore by Wondra, me DearOldMum uses pastry ...

    [1] Can use any stock you have lying around instead of milk.

  23. veti Silver badge

    Re: In 100 minutes ...

    Wow, someone who knows how to make real gravy. Now there's something I never expected to see in a thread about KFC.

    Have an upvote.

  24. c1ue

    Re: In 100 minutes ...

    Actually not thousands. Not even hundreds. The gravy - at least when I worked there in the 1980s as a teen - was made from one single fryer cabinet's bottom scrapings. That's maybe a couple dozen chickens.

  25. RobertLongshaft

    Bitcoin's utility these days is solely as a store of value or as a gateway crypto used for buying other alt coins.

    It's strange to be saying this but the technology has moved on and as Satoshi Nakamoto has chosen to remain anonymous bitcoin has not moved with the times.

    There are now a host of technologies which do everything bitcoin does, but faster and cheaper. Bitcoin Cash, Etherium, XRP and IOTA all bringing their own twist on blockchain or distributed ledger.

    Bitcoins dominance of the crypto market cap is declining and it would be no surprise to see it knocked off its perch in 2018

    I fully expect to see wide spread commercial adoption of these technologies in the coming months and years as they solve real world problems, the 'internet of value' is here to stay.

  26. Jedit
    FAIL

    "Satoshi Nakamoto has chosen to remain anonymous"

    He doesn't appear to be making a very good job of it.

  27. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese Silver badge

    I fully expect to see wide spread commercial adoption of these technologies in the coming months and years as they solve real world problems, the 'internet of value' is here to stay.

    Personally, I don't. All of the financial advisers that I have heard talking about this speak of it as a bubble waiting to burst, and are steering people away from it. When financial professionals have that amount of scepticism then I can't see big corporates in too much a hurry to embrace it.

  28. Phil W Silver badge

    Re: "Satoshi Nakamoto has chosen to remain anonymous"

    "He doesn't appear to be making a very good job of it."

    Really, who is he then?

    The Satoshi Nakamoto who really has that name and is a computer scientist isn't the creator of Bitcoin. The weird Australian guy who claimed to be Satoshi Nakamoto blatantly isn't.

  29. Pseudonymous Clown Art

    All of your examples are considerably more centralised than Bitcoin is. Especially XRP.

    Agreed, transaction times and fees may be lower...but the underlying security of the network is compromised.

    Convenience and security are trade offs.

  30. Pseudonymous Clown Art

    Re: "Satoshi Nakamoto has chosen to remain anonymous"

    CSW is not Satoshi.

  31. 's water music Silver badge

    Bitcoin's utility these days is solely as a store of value or as a gateway crypto used for buying other alt coins.

    Surely it's value is mostly as a source of cheap PR and low rent click bait churnalism?

  32. Blank Reg Silver badge

    I don't see any problems that are solved by crypto currencies that aren't solved by other payment methods such as cash, credit and debit cards. But then I'm not a criminal.

  33. Jonathan 27

    Yeah...

    Obviously, Craig Steven Wright is a an idiot who presented patently fake (and publicly available) information as proof he created bitcoin. The only reason his story picked up traction is that so many media outlets never do any sort of fact checking.

  34. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    BTC will become more centralized the more the blockchain grows. Setting up a full node from scratch already takes a long time and requires more space than casual volunteers will easily commit.

    That is a problem with most or all blockchain-based systems. In the end, only specialized banks and mining pools will have the storage and powert to maintain and reboot full nodes.

  35. KSM-AZ

    Agreed

    Most currencies have a government backing of some sort. Historically, the weaker the backing the higher the inflation rate of said currency. Bitcoin is backed by pretty much nothing. There is no government nor body that is behind the value. There are no hard assets behind the value. The fact that zillions of folks invested in a number created by an algorithm strikes me as slightly insane.

    If the balloon goes up, I would be heavily invested in ammunition?, food, tools, metals, land, you know, hard assets that are useful for something. When people don't have enough to eat, or shelter from the elements, even paper currencies fall from grace. None the less paper currency with a government (Army, Navy, Infrastructure, etc, etc) behind it generlly still has some value.

    Just not seeing bitcoin as other than a novelty. I truly expect to see it crash hard. I could be wrong, and plenty of folks will get rich off it either way . . .

  36. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

    Re: a number created by an algorithm

    Interesting analogy here.

    Currency notes have some elaborate geometrical constructions printed onto them. The idea being that the method of independently constructing that curve is difficult to mimic. The design, and planned obsolescence of such notes by necessity takes into account the likelihood of a counterfeiter coming up with a plausible fake within that timeframe.

    There must be a timeframe that would invalidate the value of Bitcoin through shortcuts in generation, or of exploiting vulnerabilties within the blockchain.

  37. c1ue

    I was just at a bitcoin meetup where an ex-Princeton professor talked for 45 minutes on all of the structural problems that Bitcoin (and *all* the other crypto schemes) have.

    Long story short: Visa processes about 4000 transactions per second with a capacity of 65000 tps. Paypal can do 130 tps or so. Bitcoin and its brethren can only do 7 - and there are *no* fixes for this on the horizon.

    And note that this professor was pushing his own blockchain/crypto scheme, so it isn't like he's down on the technology.

  38. Desgrippes

    What a surprise, those with most to lose are steering their clients away? I imagine the horse salesmen were rather froide on cars too.

  39. Desgrippes

    IOT machine to machine transactions, smart contracts for loans with middle men, chain of supply tracement, censorship resistance, you must have your eyes stitched shut or maybe just tunnel vision?

  40. Desgrippes

    open your eyes!

    https://www.stateofthedapps.com/

  41. Blank Reg Silver badge

    @Desgrippes

    You're confusing blockchain with cryptocurrency. There are uses for blockchain, but cryptocurrencies are stupid.

  42. scrubber Silver badge
    Big Brother

    Anonymous Fried Chicken

    Bitcoin is useful if you don't want anyone to know you're buying KFC.

    But then so is cash...

  43. Tom 7 Silver badge

    Re: Anonymous Fried Chicken

    And keeping your fat arse indoors too!

  44. wolfetone Silver badge
    Headmaster

    Dear El Reg,

    This article is poor. There's not one pun about gravy in this article. Such a line as "KFC jump aboard the Bitcoin gravy train" would've sufficed.

    Tut tut tut MUST DO BETTER!

  45. mix

    Hungry?

    Rubbish idea gets large corporation lots of media coverage. a.k.a. Free advertising...

  46. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

    Re: Hungry?

    That does seem the only reason they would do this.

    Who the hell would want to pay for a takeaway with bitcoin? especially given the time and cost.

    Who the hell would offer bitcon payment on a takeaway , given nobody wants it?

    hehe , bitcon , freudian slip there ...

  47. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge
    Coat

    bitbucket?

    Surely their pulling our leg?

    I think someone's been at the spice if they honestly think this is practical in anyway? I also hope the marketing bod gets friered..

    I'll get my coat...

  48. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Re: bitbucket?

    I would have gone for cockchain as a cock is a chicken.

  49. Alister Silver badge

    Re: bitbucket?

    Surely their pulling our leg?

    Or maybe they're pulling our leg.

  50. spold Bronze badge

    Re: bitbucket?

    They will be taking eggthereum next

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018