back to article 5 reasons why America's Ctrl-Z on net neutrality rules is a GOOD thing

The FCC voted 3-2 Thursday morning to get rid of net neutrality rules. If you listen to the lame-stream press (or tech press, or lawmakers, or attorneys general, or consumer groups, or celebrities, or tech giants), you will have been told this is a terrible thing. But everyone is wrong – EVERYONE!!!!! They are ALL wrong. And …

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  1. MNGrrrl
    Thumb Up

    Go FCC Yourself

    The sarcasm here is fatal.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Go FCC Yourself

      I believe you. Too bad that's basically all it is.

      1. Oh Homer Silver badge
        Terminator

        "will list every service and website you get"

        Sadly, I'm betting El Reg won't make it into our corporate overlords' shortlist.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Go FCC Yourself

      "It's time to unplug and go outside and Play"!

      Just another friendly service provided by the Government.

  2. Palpy

    Well-thought out and well-researched article.

    My best congrats. Excuse me whilst I light a ciggie -- Philip Morris has assured us they cause no harm -- and pop some oxycontin (non-addicting, according to the makers). For after all, corporations always do the right thing, just as you note in your article. Fine work!

    You know, back when I was starting out in the WoW (World of Work, not World of Warcraft) some people thought that the abbreviation "inc" stood for "innit for the cash", and that the only business of business was to make money for owners and investors. Who knew that once the Invisible Hand of Capitalism's self-interest had us tight by the nads, we would ... enjoy the squeeze.

    Because squeeze they will.

    Just as you say, we are going to enjoy it, and smile as the Invisible Hand tightens on our jewels.

    Thank you, Ajit Pai, sir! May yours rupture.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Well-thought out and well-researched article.

      Just to be clear the makers of oxycontin do say it is addictive. The leaflet in the box says it (I think they sometimes use the phrase "habit forming") the prescribing doctor should also warn you.

      No, I don't work for them or in that industry but I have had to take strong pain killers.

      1. Alistair Silver badge
        Windows

        Re: Well-thought out and well-researched article.

        @AC

        This will depend *heavily* on where your Oxycontin was packaged and distributed. It however will *never* use the term addictive.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Great article but I don't think you understand Snowflakes.

    I grew up without stair gates, socket protectors, harnesses and the like, these days kids never get told "no" because there are things that do it for lazy parents. Try going through life without someone saying "no", there is the problem. I feel sorry for kids these days.

    1. Comments are attributed to your handle
      Childcatcher

      By all means then, uninstall your seat belt, air bags, roll cage, etc. and get back to us.

      1. jake Silver badge

        I'll be happy to, Caatyh ...

        ... as soon as the PTB actually force people like you to learn to drive before allowing them to be in charge of a moving vehicle. Those things don't protect me from myself, they protect me from you.

      2. Charles 9 Silver badge

        "By all means then, uninstall your seat belt, air bags, roll cage, etc. and get back to us."

        And while you're at it, take out your horn and install a sharp spike in its place and let Date in sort 'em out. And if you happen to get rammer head on by a drunk ghost driver, we'll them's the breaks.

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        "By all means then, uninstall your seat belt, air bags, roll cage, etc. and get back to us."

        Bravo, you are talking about things that save lives.

        The things I mentioned are there as an extra to stop accidents that didn't occur that often.

        Are any of the things I mentioned enshrined in law? No and ask yourself why.

        Why not teach children from an early age what they can and cannot do? Why rely on some nanny device?

        1. Charles 9 Silver badge

          Because some kids CAN'T learn, yet the parents (their only child and they can't try again) sue.

          1. Aladdin Sane Silver badge

            Re: Socket Protectors

            Actually make plug sockets more dangerous (in the UK at least).

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Socket Protectors

              They're not "plug sockets", they are "sockets" (or "power sockets" to be more precise).

              Where did this modern fad for calling them "plug sockets" come from? </pedant>

              1. CFtheNonPartisan

                Re: Socket Protectors

                Do you mean they are not really 'power points'? !?!

              2. Sam Therapy

                Re: Socket Protectors

                Same place as "Reverse back", "PIN Number" and "Round circle", the Tautology Fairy.

                It is what it is.

                I'll get me outer garment coat.

            2. Sam Therapy

              Re: Socket Protectors

              Correct. Their use is banned in all NHS Premises. And yet, building inspectors will give a warning to any NHS premises that don't use them, so they put them in until someone complains about it, or points out they're unsafe, so they take them out. Then the building inspectors come in and...

        2. fandom Silver badge

          "Why not teach children from an early age what they can and cannot do? "

          Do you want to guess how I learned it is a bad idea to put your fingers in an electrical socket or that using the clothes to climb up a closet gets you to the floor real fast or that it is better not to drink from the bottles your mother uses to clean the house?

          Thing is I survived childhood by pure luck, despite having caring parents, it's no wonder houses get child proofed nowadays.

          And there is still many an ocassion to say 'no' to children if the parents want to educate them.

          1. This post has been deleted by its author

      4. swampdog

        oo! It's Friday and we have a car argument!

        Those of us of a certain age.. managed to live before selt belts, air bags, roll cage, etc and we are getting back to you by virtue of the fact we're still here.

        1. AdamWill

          Re: oo! It's Friday and we have a car argument!

          Unfortunately we are currently lacking a way to include all the people who were killed in crashes involving insanely dangerous cars in the conversation, but we're working on it.

      5. Kiwi Silver badge

        By all means then, uninstall your seat belt, air bags, roll cage, etc. and get back to us

        My car has no airbag (except the occasional M.I.L) and no roll cage.

        I learnt to drive, and make sure I drive well. I also work at watching the road and things around me to be able to see trouble before I'm in it.

        That way, I don't need things like roll cages.

        My bike doesn't have any seat belts either. They're not needed if you use your brains when you're driving.

        If you really think you need all the things you listed to stay safe while driving, then please GET THE FUCK OFF THE ROAD because if you're scared to drive without them, you've obviously far too dangerous to be allowed behind the wheel.

        (I don't think I've even see a roll cage in a stock road vehicle!)

        1. Charles 9 Silver badge

          "My bike doesn't have any seat belts either. They're not needed if you use your brains when you're driving."

          Not even when (not if) you get blindsided by a reckless, speeding drunk driver?

          You have to consider that safety features not only protect you from yourself but also from Stupid, who has a tendency to kill others in his/her wake.

          1. Kiwi Silver badge
            Pint

            Not even when (not if) you get blindsided by a reckless, speeding drunk driver?

            Quite right. I have literally "been there done that".

            And I avoided the crash because, with training, constant practice to reinforce the training and keep me up on how my vehicle handles in extreme situations (means getting out to an empty car park (and gravel and grass etc) and throwing it around), and keeping my eyes and ears open, I was able to notice them coming and NOT be in the same place as them.

            It's not impossible to avoid these things if you have your eyes and ears open, and your brain engaged. And if you practice + know your vehicle you don't have to think about how to react, you don't have to think about how much pressure to apply to the brakes to get the maximum stopping power, you don't have to think about how much to turn the steering to turn suddenly to get out of their path, you've already taught your system exactly how to get where you want to go. Add a positive use of "target fixation" into the mix and there is very little chance you'll ever need to use those safety features.

            I've done a lot of Friday and Saturday night riding through main-road rural New Zealand. I've had plenty of experience at avoiding drunken idiots.

            (actually add watching your food/fluid intake to my list in the previous post - if you're busting for a piss or trying desperately to keep the curry you had for dinner from coming out early, you're not focusing on the world around you - and if you ever do have a "pucker moment", it just got messier...)

            1. dmacleo

              how my vehicle handles in extreme situations

              ******************************************************

              key point. way to many drivers on both sides of the pond have no idea how their vehicle responds in emergency situation.

              while I live in maine I learned how to really drive on the autobahn many decades ago.

              since then with every vehicle I have owned I spent time learning its capabilities.

              while my 2010 mercury marquis will do 155 mph (don't ask but tested on speedo and gps) I KNOW above 130mph the front end capabilities are extremely degraded.

              I know exactly how the rear suspension will handle at a given air pressure (I have rear air bags on suspension for towing) and whenever I get new set of tires I spend many miles testing how they react.

              1. Kiwi Silver badge
                Pint

                how my vehicle handles in extreme situations

                ******************************************************

                key point. way to many drivers on both sides of the pond have no idea how their vehicle responds in emergency situation.

                [..]

                since then with every vehicle I have owned I spent time learning its capabilities.

                [..]

                I know exactly how the rear suspension will handle at a given air pressure (I have rear air bags on suspension for towing) and whenever I get new set of tires I spend many miles testing how they react.

                I learned much of my driving on farm land, so I got a crash-course in traction control. In that I was privileged but that is something people can learn easily. Of course, that knowledge doesn't translate as well as you'd think because all sorts of factors come into play as you yourself have noted! (motorcyclist per chance?)

                A friend of mine got himself a bike with an odd noise in it, and through finding a US forum for that model he stumbled upon a whole world of safety stuff that we never get in NZ (despite many of us trying to get the governments to improve safety the right way, they insist on stupid measures that at best don't work!). He and I started braking practice1 together and it's a real eye-opener to learn the differences in many vehicles between braking hard at 90kph and braking hard at 100kph, especially when the differences in road seals (tarmac vs volcanic chip vs gravel vs packed sand vs mud) and weather and other things start to come into play.

                It's great to know there are other people around who take their driving seriously, and do a proper job of it! I was beginning to think there were very few of us! (actually, sadly, there are far to few of us but always glad to find another :) )

                1 Braking practice : Find an empty car park or other safe area. In stages, get up to speed and slam on the anchors so-to-speak. So see how it performs at 30kph when you brake hard, and increase the speed in stages till you know it's going to be safe to hit the brakes hard at 100kph. Use an area with lots of room because until you know how things react, you can be in for a nasty surprise eg ABS doesn't work on 1 front wheel at higher speeds, throwing your car way off course. As you learn your vehicles characteristics, add in things like sudden evasive steering and so on. Again work it up SLOWLY. Add in obstacles (cardboard boxes other safe-to-hit stuff) and take it on gravel/wet grass/sand etc.

                Also, practice this every other week or so.

                In doing this, you learn your car's handling quite well, and you learn a lot more about how to handle ANY vehicle in bad conditions (though it doesn't always translate well; a SUV will perform very differently to a sedan) including slippery conditions. And as I've said a couple of times already, you teach your body how to react so you don't have to think about it at all. So-called "muscle memory" makes your feet put the right pressure on the brakes or the gas, makes your hands turn the steering and so on to the right angles to get where you want to go. All you have to think is "Oh shit! where's that gap? Oh there it is, I'm through there and safe!".

        2. Kiwi Silver badge
          Black Helicopters

          (I don't think I've even see a roll cage in a stock road vehicle!)

          Wow, the crap drivers who think they're hot are out in force today!

          For those less crappy drivers, I'll explain myself a little better (I hope).

          The first thing you must rely on to protect yourself from a crash is YOURSELF. Be alert. See it coming. Take action. Stop to help any other victims (if any). Drive on in the knowledge that you and your passengers are safe and well, and your vehicle also came out unscathed because you didn't drive in a straight line hoping your protection in your car would save you from the truck coming towards you in the wrong lane, you took action and the truck never hit you.

          I've been close to head-on crashes. Close. Through training and maintaining those skills I avoided being in a head-on. Through training I could already see a number of probably escape routes before I saw the truck suddenly veer, through training I knew exactly how my bike would perform under braking (I do the same for cars - PRACTICE often so I know it's actions and it never surprises me), through training I knew how hard I could swerve, and through observance I knew the truck driver was never getting back into the right lane for him and that lane was clear so I could use it.

          Train so you're prepared, practice so you know how to handle your vehicle, plan for your escape routes, and watch the road so you can see what's coming. And always remember your most valuable resource in your car. It's not brakes. It's not skills. It's not an alert driver (though that should always be). It's not air bags. Nor is it roll cages.

          It's TIME. If you have time to react and time to avoid the crash, you'll be fine. Coming up on a line of traffic that might be stopped? Start slowing. Coming up to a tight corner where the oncoming traffic might not be in their lane? Slow down. Passing a line of stopped traffic where some idiot might pull out into your lane without warning or looking? Slow down. Give yourself TIME to react.

          Then you won't ever need air bags, or roll-cages, or even seatbelts.

          Also think of what could happen around you and take steps to minimise any risk. Mostly that means keeping a sane following distance and allowing more if the person behind you is one of those stupid idiots who tailgate.

          (And yes, I do wear mine in the car, same as I always wear my helmet - I've avoided a couple of major events, dozens of other incidents where I could've been killed and would've been hurt, and quite literally thousands of minor incidents where at most I would've had bent metal and bruised body to deal with - but it is possible that something would escape my attention or there would be something I could not avoid)

          1. Truckle The Uncivil

            @Kiwi

            And learn Judo so you know how to fall properly. I have been a rider since 1970 and while much of what you say is true, it is not enough. There are things you cannot forsee and there are fools who will try to kill you.

            Unless you are Superman riding a motorcycle is a dangerous practice. It an be very worthwhile thoug, if you can maintain your luck.

            1. Kiwi Silver badge
              Pint

              And learn Judo so you know how to fall properly. I have been a rider since 1970 and while much of what you say is true, it is not enough. There are things you cannot forsee and there are fools who will try to kill you.

              Unless you are Superman riding a motorcycle is a dangerous practice. It an be very worthwhile thoug, if you can maintain your luck.

              Luck's not been a part of it since I learned to ride. In the years before I learned to ride I think it was more God's protection than luck because I had some stupid events on the road where I was at fault and should not have come out alive let alone unscathed.

              I know people who've also been riding since the 70's and earlier who've never had a crash. I've been involved in some very hairy incidents yet have only lost rubber and some time (reminds me must do a first-aid refresher). I haven't always been able to accurately predict which car gets hit first, but I have been able to predict who would do the hitting. Keeping your mind on the road and those around you, keeping your exit options open etc, that's what keeps you upright, not luck.

              I'm trying to think what would catch me out. A stalled car or landslip around a blind corner won't - I'm always within my stopping distance (and I keep my bike maintained as well, so I won't have any surprise brake failures etc). A long landslip might (ie I'm in the area covered and don't have time to stop before I reach it nor time to get out of it), someone intending to kill me might (but then if they're intent on killing me all bets are off even if I've got protection of some sort - even the US's SS have failed to protect presidents), a tyre blowout on a truck that doesn't give smoke or other warning might. I've had a person reading the paper at traffic lights who didn't realise his SUV was still moving forward at a decent rate - the car beside me got hit, not me. I was in line but I left myself room and when I saw the SUV coming I pulled up past the car that was in front of me.

              Someone on the wrong side, travelling at speed - not sure on that one. I have avoided it before but that "small voice" that motorcyclists know so well (if they listen to it) gave me the idea to take a wider and slower track on this particular corner. That coupled with a distraction may do, but distractions I tend to ignore until I have a safe place to give them some attention, whether it's stopping straight away or riding slowly to the next town. In the days before I knew how to ride I went off the road by paying more attention to an odd noise from the bike than where the bike was. Huge wide shoulder so I was fine, but I learnt that lesson then.

              It takes effort, but I find the effort worth it. My challenge is to be a good driver always, and that can be very challenging indeed (especially when you're easily distracted!), and every drive I complete with that challenge met is very fulfilling. I also challenge myself to get the perfect line and speed through a corner, and that is just fun.

              I may die in a crash, but it's going to take a sudden medical event without warning or a set of extremely rare circumstances to cause it.

        3. notowenwilson

          @Kiwi

          "I learnt to drive, and make sure I drive well. I also work at watching the road and things around me to be able to see trouble before I'm in it.

          That way, I don't need things like roll cages."

          Your hubris is truly awe inspiring. "I can keep myself safe by my own actions, everything that happens to me is under my control".

          Good luck with that bud!

          1. Kiwi Silver badge
            WTF?

            @Kiwi

            "I learnt to drive, and make sure I drive well. I also work at watching the road and things around me to be able to see trouble before I'm in it.

            That way, I don't need things like roll cages."

            Your hubris is truly awe inspiring. "I can keep myself safe by my own actions, everything that happens to me is under my control".

            Good luck with that bud!

            So.. You're one of those idiots who drive along without paying attention to the road because "technology and armour" will protect you rather than actually taking actions to do things like watch what is happening on the road around you?

            In New Zealand we have things like "defensive driving" courses, to teach people how to be better drivers. I am sure many other countries have the same things. For a start there's the Motorcycle Safety Foundation in the US, and I'm sure the UK has similar organisations. There's also the entire licensing system in many countries that test drivers to see if they are able to, among other things, spot hazards on the road and react in an appropriate manner to avoid an accident.

            Are you saying that all of these things are wrong? What then, oh enlightened sir, should all of these countries use to replace them?

            "I can keep myself safe by my own actions, everything that happens to me is under my control".

            Close but not quite. I do everything I can to make sure everything possible is under my control and I won't get a nasty surprise. I keep my vehicle maintained - that way a sudden failure is unlikely. Not impossible, but unlikely, eg tyres at the correct pressure are less likely to get a puncture than tyres at a low pressure, parts of the drivechain correctly lubricated are unlikely to cease, as is a correctly lubricated and cooled engine. Parts replaced on a schedule or when showing wear (eg wheel bearings) mean they can be relied on to function well rather than failing.

            I take my health into consideration when driving, preferably not while tired or sick but if I have to I allow for slower reaction times etc. And yes, I do consider what I eat and drink so I don't have a situation where I'm desperate for a leak and increasing my speed and decreasing my focus while trying to reach the next stopping point before my bladder decides it's had enough.

            As best as I can I observe drivers around me. There's things about a car that can tell you if you have an arrogant driver or a sane driver. An older person constantly hitting the brakes perhaps has some vision issues and is unsure of themselves. A young person in a car with a loud exhaust (not faulty loud but modified loud) probably has a combination of higher arrogance, desire to show off (if passengers especially teenage male driver and female passenger) and lower experience and skills. A driver with their head craned to one side is quite possible tired, may even be nodding off. A driver weaving around in their lane could be drunk or having a medical event. A driver weaving out of their lane is about to crash - back well off. Window wipers coming on unexpectedly (without washer fluid) show a car the driver isn't entirely familiar with, and they're about to turn off/change lane etc (hit the wrong stalk).

            A smell of diesel can suggest a spill on the road. "Dead rainbows" suggest a slick surface and also that for a little while afterwards your tyres will be slicker than normal. Smells of cattle/sheep manure suggest that there may have been a cattle truck nearby (with waste released) or perhaps a mob has been moved across/along a road. Other smells can tell you a lot about what's potentially coming up.

            It's a matter of paying attention and adjusting your driving to possible risks.

            I'm guessing when there's a pile of bright red lights ahead of you, you don't bother hitting the brakes as 'good luck with keeping yourself safe by your own actions'?

            I seriously hope you don't drive, and if you do I seriously hope you either take some time to learn how to be a safe driver, or end up being stopped from driving until you do.

        4. small and stupid

          Hope you have a donor card

          1. Kiwi Silver badge

            Hope you have a donor card

            I don't,

            I do have a driver's license with the donor field ticked however.

            But because I take care to drive appropriately, I'm not likely to need it.

        5. Kiwi Silver badge
          Paris Hilton

          17 downvotes at this point.

          Would any of them care to explain what's wrong with taking care while driving?

          What's wrong with taking extra driving training?

          What's wrong with being observant of the overall road conditions? (including other drivers)?

          Or can you explain what's right about relying on technology to protect you rather than doing your best to protect yourself?

          Honest question. There are a number of downvotes but not one person suggesting what I am actually doing wrong.

    2. Richard 81

      @OP:

      You do realise Goodwin's Law has been extended to include references to "Snowflakes", right?

      1. IT Poser

        Richard 81,

        You do realise Goodwin's Law has been extended to include references to "Snowflakes", right?

        Actually "Snowflakes" is a corollary. AFAIK this particular corollary has not yet been rigorously defined. Feel free to create one. This information will be very useful as our AI develops psychohistory.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Richard 81,

          Goodwin's law already in net neutrality.

        2. Sam Therapy
          Angel

          Re: Richard 81,

          Hitler was a snowflake!

    3. W4YBO

      Re: Great article but I don't think you understand Snowflakes.

      My first experience with electricity was when I took the metal key that went to the plastic car dashboard and stuck it in a wall socket. I was two, and I never did it again, at least not until I figured out the wide side is neutral.

    4. tin 2

      You know of course that having socket protectors is more dangerous than not? You bloody great pansy.

  4. Bob Dole (tm)
    Pint

    Well put

    Beautiful piece of writing.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      @Bob Dole ... WTF? Re: Well put

      Some of us are old enough to know of the time before the internet.

      That understood that the 'net was a cluster of privately owned networks who connected to one another through peering agreements.

      You host our traffic, we'll host yours.

      The issue wasn't about censorship, but that the peering arrangement was out of wack.

      That Company A agreed to carry Company B's traffic, and vice versa, but that Company's upstream traffic that went over Company B's network was a fraction of the traffic traveling downstream from Company B over Company A's network.

      Where everyone is running around in a panic, they forget that businesses will work it out.

      Did you notice how Netflix, the poster child for NN is now silent on the issue? Its because they did deals with the network companies that became a win/win for everyone.

      Why? Because Netflix is feeling competition from HULU and other streaming services.

      The networks? Because with 5G coming around the corner... you can cut the cable and get good broadband speed.

      There's more, but I expect to be down posted by the snowflakes and marching morons who have been listening to MSM and politicians who have been spoon fed dribble from lobbyists.

      1. veti Silver badge
        Pirate

        Re: @Bob Dole ... WTF? Well put

        "businesses will work it out"? - Oh, that's all right then, whatever were we worried about.

        "People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices" - Adam Smith.

      2. Oengus Silver badge
        Headmaster

        Re: @Bob Dole ... WTF? Well put

        spoon fed dribble drivel

        FTFY

      3. KSM-AZ

        Re: @Bob Dole ... WTF? Well put

        Downotes are from the children that think they have a "right" to unlimited bandwidth someone else paid to put in place. They were no around back in the day . . . After all, the gubmint is better at all this.

      4. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: @Bob Dole ... WTF? Well put

        Hey guys did you hear?

        Netflix have changed their minds, and that can only mean that actually NN is bad.

        Couldn't just be that Netflix isn't the Patron Saint of NN, but actually also just a corporation which needs a good flogging now and again to be kept in check.

        Now if only we could get around to flogging a few of the banks, multinational tax evaders/avoiders (forget which is the totally legal, but still scummy one), we might wind up with a pretty nifty little society.

      5. dan1980

        Re: @Bob Dole ... WTF? Well put

        @AC

        "Some of us are old enough to know of the time before the internet. That understood that the 'net was a cluster of privately owned networks who connected to one another through peering agreements.

        Maybe so but then then things evolved; grew.

        The simple fact of the matter is that, like telephone poles, Internet coax and fibre is placed on public land and the right to do this is given based on the central place that Internet services inhabit in modern life.

        Train lines were once 'clusters of privately-owned' networks and then, once they became more than that, the Interstate Commerce Commission was specifically created to regulate the new networks that had become essential for, well, interstate commerce.

        This exactly parallels the creation of the the FCC, which is unsurprising because the latter was modeled on the success of the former and so carries a near identical purpose: to regulate the (then) new communications networks.

      6. Alistair Silver badge
        Windows

        Re: @Bob Dole ... WTF? Well put

        @AC with the spoon fed dribble.

        I don't need spoon feeding of dribble. The lobbyists in question work for the telecoms companies, all of the *big three(four?)* here in Canada. They all have this one neat trick for making money hand over fist (click here, now to learn it). They have absolutely zero obligation to the consumer, the only obligation is to the stock price/shareholder, and **laws and regulations**

        I recall my first DARPA (9600kb/s modem) connection to a college system. And the attempts to get connected to the "interwebs" in the 90's. And the data costs. At least up here we have the equivalent of LLU, and there *ARE* competitors.

        And I have some little experience with the telecoms industry.

        I sincerely hope that the lawsuits against the FCC steamroller out the issue clearly. I hope that someone sues Pai himself directly into revealing where *EVERY* penny he has ever earned, invested, spent, viewed or been within 10 yards of came from.

      7. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: @Bob Dole ... WTF? Well put

        So please explain to me how having to pay up when Comcast extorted money from them (remember 2014?) is a "win/win" for Netflix or anyone other than Comcast?

        This is the same 'the market will solve everything' bullshit that led to American rivers catching fire due to pollution, there's a reason we have the EPA and it wasn't because 'the market' was making companies do the right thing for anyone except their shareholders.

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