back to article UK's new Data Protection Bill will be 'liberal' not 'libertarian', says digi minister

Digital minister Matt Hancock has confirmed that the Data Protection Bill will be published tomorrow, in a speech promising internet laws "based on liberal and not libertarian values" that "cherish freedom yet prevent harm to others". Speaking at the UK Internet Governance Forum, Hancock said the forthcoming data protection …

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"Speaking at the UK Internet Governance Forum, Hancock said the forthcoming data protection regime will bring the internet into “the twenty-first century, giving citizens more sovereignty over their data, and greater penalties for those who break the rules.”"

Bullshit will it.

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@wolfetone

I'm sure the "greater penalties" part will. Citizens will be breaking the rules afterall. I don't think I even need to quote the Cardinal.

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Re: @wolfetone

What does that even mean though? Sony got £250,000 fine. What would Equifux get with these new powers? A £250,001 fine?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: @wolfetone

"What does that even mean though?"

Turnover based fines and criminal charges, rather than the current fixed civil penalties.

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Devil

Yes, "you no longer own your data, we own your data and any attempt to use said data will result in severe penalties!"

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Facepalm

"For starters, we have equalled the penalty for copyright infringement to be the same online as offline. We are supporting further copyright reform to support rights holders and help close the value gap."

Yeah, lets start protecting British citizens, by protecting the IP rights of multinational corporations! Yay!

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If he meant "Liberal with your privacy, security, safety and other miscellaneous rights" then I'm inclined to think he might have been telling the truth.

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If he meant "Liberal with your privacy, security, safety and other miscellaneous rights" then I'm inclined to think he might have been telling the truth.

It all sounds too much like "light touch regulation" to me; remember where that got us.

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giving citizens more sovereignty over their data

But not enough to stop GCHQ trawling through any of it whenever they feel like it.

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RE: Sovereignty

In this context "sovereignty" means being spied on by GCHQ in your own sovereign nation, as opposed to the data being shipped overseas for NSA/CIA or some other foreign agency to spy on you

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Re: RE: Sovereignty

I think you mean in addition to. Pretty sure the Great Firewall of Cheltenham will have straight feed into other five eyes.

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Re: RE: Sovereignty

In this context "sovereignty" means...

Property of the crown, and outside the EU we'll be subjects, not citizens.

I'd be honestly surprised if there's anything 'liberal' about anything they decide to enact.

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Unhappy

But not enough to stop GCHQ trawling through any of it whenever they feel like it.

From a purely personal perspective I am much less concerned about that possibility than I about the fact that there is a good chance that there is more personal information about me sitting on a server in the US belonging to a US company and thus effectively beyond the control of any UK legal oversight. I have no fundamental objection to someone keeping a file noting my creditworthiness as long is contains nothing beyond what is a matter of public record; CCJs, bankruptcies and so on. If it contains anything like bank details, NI / NHS numbers and so on - none of which have any connection with my underlying reliability - then I find that highly objectionable.

I fear that Matt Hancock will remain silent if matters like that are brought to his limited attention. Is he happy that US citizens have more sovereignty over my data than I have?

I suspect the answer is that he doesn't give a shit, really...

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Big Brother

Any mention of when he's going to tackle the police's illegal mugshot and DNA databases?

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It will be protected sovereignly

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Any mention of when he's going to tackle the police's illegal mugshot and DNA databases?

Why would he do this? When the minister who was responsible for turning as much of a blind eye to this as possible this is now the PM and her fuckwit crony is the current Home Secretary. Nothing positive is going to happen until these police state wannabees are ousted from power and influence.

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Meh

Liberal democracy... O'Rly?

That'll be why MPs made some grand speeches then spinelessly got the EU Withdrawal Bill through its second reading without making any amendments to it on Monday and then the government appointed a majority of Tory MPs to all the committees despite not having a majority in Parliament yesterday. Now the bill is going through to committee the government can reject all of the amendments there and then just stare down the House of Lords.

Or to put it in geek terms, this is an Android app with all the permissions set. You just wouldn't trust it enough to install it.

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Boffin

>Hancock said the forthcoming data protection regime will bring the internet into “the twenty-first century [...]

I'm guessing that'll be about three centuries from now, given the UKs track record with implementing technology.

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"Sometimes we do need regulation, like with the age verification laws to prevent children viewing porn easily online, just as they do offline."

If children are viewing porn easily offline is he also introducing similar regulation for the offline world?

I know that is not what he meant but it is what he said.

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@ iron

I was also going to point out the difficulties of applying effective age verification especially on servers outside the UK. Surely this should be an educational thing and not a 'banned for your own freedom' thing.

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What ???

"personal data" to include IP addresses, internet cookies and DNA.

Erm, where to begin? Damn, not here, I'd be preaching to the choir (probably at length).

I hope that quote is a journalistic simplification, because that would leave scope for having consulted someone who knows what (s)he is talking about, and a law whose detail makes a bit more sense.

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Anonymous Coward

Whaa?

There are some MPs that make you think; Why would anybody vote for that pillock? Handcock is one of the same.

Next they'll be telling us, as they vote themselves a nice rise, that we need to pay to get the best! Herd of Harlots

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I just hope they provide a bit less ambiguity to the 'Legitimate Interests' clause. Some commentators are taking that to mean - as long as I have (our company has) a legitimate interest (our interest) in doing it we don't need consent.

other commentators are saying that this is extremely narrow and only when explicit consent would have been impossible. I suspect the meaning should be the latter and very narrow. However it was also muddied by recital 47 which stated "The processing of personal data for direct marketing purposes may be regarded as carried out for a legitimate interest." which has caused major confusion. Everything seems so clear and quite black and white and then they throw this curve ball.

I can only think this was included as a lobbying measure. There's been a lot of commentary about it but the most informed seem to suggest that direct marketing when the is no explicit consent is not allowed as a rule.

Hopefully the DPB will clear all this up - I doubt it and looking at the IP/Cookie thing could cause even more confusion.

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It won't. It'll be left to the Courts. And the English courts will inevitably disagree with the EU courts. And then you'll get people like Andrew Orlowski complaining about judges meddling with the law.

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fairer economic landscape online

Matt Hancock needs to start looking at better digital ownership laws.

One of the most important law cases that didn't happen, was the misreporting that Bruce Willis was going to sue apple over the lack of digital inheritance with his massive iTunes library. A cynical person might say those with influence in this area told him not to pursue the idea. Its a shame, someone of his influence could have made the digital landscape a lot fairer for consumers.

Right now, in the UK I'd guess there to be hundreds of millions of pounds of digital assets owned buy consumers. iTunes tracks, google play videos, Steam games, amazon eBooks and so one. None of which the consumer has any defined rights of ownership. You die and you next of kin have no right to them.

Things like Steam impose ridiculous restrictions. Own 2 computers and 100 games, play 1 game on one computer and the other 99 are locked out from any other computer.

We desperately need digital ownership laws to give consumers basic rights that have been taken away,

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"Sometimes we do need regulation, like with the age verification laws to prevent children viewing porn easily online, just as they do offline."

We have laws & regulations to enable children to view porn easily offline? Very liberal I must say.

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Paris Hilton

Seems a little confused

He seems to be confusing data protection with the protection of property rights or just merging them all together because they also use the word 'protection'.

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Re: Seems a little confused

Yes, I noticed that. I don't know if that's standard politician tactic - merge two issues and claim to support one you need the other - or sloppy reporting. The data protection bit wasn't in the quote, the juxtaposition is El Reg's.

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Re: Seems a little confused

He seems to be confusing data protection with the protection of property rights or just merging them all together because they also use the word 'protection'.

So maybe we're going to have to issue some DMCA take-down equivalent to prevent the likes of Facebook, social media and quasi-governmental agencies from playing footsie with our personal information.

I'm betting this will end up just reinforcing the castle walls for those that already have them, and the villagers will be left with the usual shoddy lean-tos at the foot of the raised drawbridge, as usual.

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Anonymous Coward

As the UK leaves the EU we will ensure we have one of the most robust systems for protection of intellectual property anywhere in the world

So that equates to 20 years hard labour then for downloading one MP3, that should please Android Oreolowski.

Copyright, a perpetual licence to megacorps so they can beat people up and take their money. Make it fair, 20-50 years.

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