back to article Google's Android 8.0 Oreo has been served

Google on Monday released Android 8.0 Oreo, the latest update to the world's most widely used operating system, as measured by internet usage. First released as a developer preview in March, when the code was designated by the letter "O" instead of a trademarked confection, Google's mobile operating system hasn't piggybacked …

Silver badge

Yeah, right

I have an HTC phone which has not been upgraded since 5.something. The news that HTC will be shipping or upgrading devices indicates to me that they will expect me to spend £600 to replace a perfectly good phone with something marginally better(?)/different.

Ain't gonna happen

32
1
Silver badge

Re: Yeah, right

Android device vendors didn't have the best reputation for regular updates even at the time you bought your HTC.

3
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Yeah, right

Lenovo just pushed the upgrade to 6.0 for my tablet last month... not quite up-to-date, but better than nothing

8.0? Not gonna happen!

1
0
WTF?

Re: Yeah, right

Moto promised an upgrade to Nougat for my g4 play when I bought i earlier this year, however the service preventer (EE) is failing to make it available. I did wonder about slipping a SIM from the one service provider with an upgrade availability to see if it would deliver the package. The phone was bought as SIM free and has previously worked with that service so it might be worth a punt.

3
1
Silver badge

Re: Yeah, right

Wileyfox have just pushed the Android 7.0 update to my Spark X (to replace Cyanogenmod). Do you think it's working? No. My phone is telling "Oh you want Android 7.0? Ain't gonna happen pal".

1
1
Silver badge

Re: Yeah, right

@Wolfetone

Wileyfox pushed 7.1.1 onto my Swift months ago. Works fine (for some values of fine).

There was a horrible push feed called "Zen" that everyone screamed about until Wileyfox introduced a setting to let you disable it (which just about everyone did).

Truedialler with its annoying ads has mutated into Truephone, which is even more annoying. I have yet to find a way of totally getting rid of it short of rooting my phone (which I'm reluctant to do). However, I have managed to replace the dialler and replaced the call screening with "shouldianswer" which gives me much more control over what info about callers I choose to let the screeners have. But I still worry about Truecaller being spyware and a bloated, battery-wasting piece of shit doing fuck knows what behind my back, so I wish I could get rid of it completely.

The drawer is a big comedown. I loved the letter bar on the old drawer and the new drawer doesn't have one. But Jina is a lot better than even the original drawer, fully configurable and does everything you want except give you a BJ. You'll have to replace the Foxhole launcher with Nova in order to have Jina replace Foxhole's drawer, but Nova is a better launcher anyway.

You can't get at UI Tuner any more. Which is really annoying because I used to have cursor left-right arrows pop up on the navbar when the keyboard appeared. But you can get at UI Tuner via third-party apps and sort of get the cursor keys back. You can't tie them to keyboard activation (so they're always on) you have to supply your own icons, and things are buggy enough that the icons vanish (but the hotspots still work) after a reboot. Only fix for that (that I've found) is to go to UI Tuner again, swap two of the hotspots, save, swap them back, save.

Other than those annoyances (most introduced by Wileyfox themselves, stock Android has a better dialler, better drawer and lets you get at UI tweaks) it's all good. Android 7 is better than Android 6. Wileyfox's version of Android 7 is less so.

When Wileyfox will push out Oreo is anybody's guess.

2
0
Silver badge

Re: Yeah, right

@handleoclast

I've seen as much, but I'm suffering from a few performance issues with Cyanogenmod at the moment so was hoping the upgrade would help it. Interesting you mention Truecaller, that thing has stopped working for me. Every time I go to open it it closes. So I can't block any callers now.

I'm going away tomorrow and I was hoping to have it all done by then, but I might just muddle through it until I get back and buy a no-name cheap thing from AliExpress and be done with it.

1
0
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Re: Yeah, right

Hang on, I thought sim free phones would get updates from the handset manufacturer rather than the service preventer (As they are free from their guff)?

2
0
Silver badge

Re: Yeah, right

@wolfetone it looks like only the Swift and the Storm have official builds of LineageOS 14 (the replacement for CM). If this is the case then there is either no maintainer (unlikely in the case of Wileyfox), or there are significant problems with the hardware. If it is the hardware then it must be something pretty odd considering that things like the Samsung SII is officially supported.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

"service preventer"

Heh. Notwork provider was ours.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Yeah, right

Yep, already running android 8. Updated later night.

Perhaps you bought the wrong device???

2
0

Re: Yeah, right

Why is it that EE can block the update on my phone! I don't download it from them or via 3/4G so they can F off. I'd try that tactic of putting another SIM in if you know a provider is allowing it.

0
0
Silver badge

"Whether mobile carriers will take advantage of this change to provide more timely updates has yet to be established."

Well then, please allow me to establish it for you.

No, it won't.

Anything else I can do for you?

36
0
Silver badge

Google Need Them To

And it maybe that they get their way. If all bespoke device drivers get ported into Project Treble, then Google can update literally everything else on the phone, including the kernel, without any input from the manufacturer. or at least that's the idea.

I think people have gotten so used to Android being unupgradable that most people have little idea that it could be different. It will be interesting to see how it goes.

It will place a lot of pressure on those manufacturers that doctor the user interface on their phones. They will still have to do a ton of work to move up OS versions. Those who just stick to the stock Android experience and who put all their drivers into Project Treble will be making phones that are more upgradable by Google. Word will get around.

Of course, they might all just decide to ignore Project Treble and keep things as they are. Cartel...

22
0
Silver badge

Re: Google Need Them To

If upgrades start coming to end user devices then they have to deal with the consequences/complaints when they don't go well. Apple has only a handful of hardware configurations, all of which they control themselves, and their upgrades aren't always trouble free.

There's no way Google won't have many more problems than Apple has had if they start sending upgrades directly to phones, considering the massive number of hardware permutations out there and their lack of control over the hardware. It might end up a situation where the upgrades are available but most people disable them because they've had problems in the past or know people who have.

Google has to tread VERY carefully if they think to start upgrading directly without carrier/OEM involvement!

4
0
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: Google Need Them To

then Google can update literally everything

Ah, but what can they practically update?

5
0
Silver badge

Re: Google Need Them To

Google has to tread VERY carefully if they think to start upgrading directly without carrier/OEM involvement!

Not really. They've been pushing abstraction for a few years now and this will probably restrict Android 8 to configurations they can manage. After all we're only talking about officially licensed versions of Android, not the heap of stuff based on AOSP coming out of China.

5
0
Silver badge

Re: Google Need Them To

Search/chrome/etc already update from the play store. Adding more features to that, should not be a problem.

1
0
Silver badge

Re: Google Need Them To

It is lower level updates that will bite you. You can't brick a phone updating its browser, but you can if you update its kernel or drivers.

0
0
Silver badge

Re: Google Need Them To

But as noted, Google can take a different approach with the hardware. First, they can take the Apple approach and only sanction certain classes of hardware for which knowledge is mature and abundant. Second, we know they're also taking the Microsoft approach with an abstraction layer that can help smooth out differences in hardware by giving the hardware driver writers a common set of targets. This may well have basis in the Server Base System Architecture: an ACPI-like system being developed as ARM progresses into the server market.

These approaches together with contract terms concerning carrying Google Play Services and Google could well coerce manufacturers to comply with new standards that force them to relinquish update control.

0
0
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Google Need Them To

This may well have basis in the Server Base System Architecture: an ACPI-like system being developed as ARM progresses into the server market.

It's almost certain that the chips are all close enough to some kind of reference design from ARM because it's too difficult to customise it; there are still only a handful of designers of phone SoCs. There might still be problems with custom drivers, but given how well things like LineageOS cope with the relevant blobs, this shouldn't be too much of a problem when it comes to running an upgrade, though it's possible that some apps might no longer work. That could lead to some interesting battles: "Google broke our camera app with a security update…" but I suspect most manufacturers that care will be pleased to see Google taking the lead here.

0
0
Silver badge

Re: Google Need Them To

The trick is that ARM isn't responsible for a lot of the peripheral hardware: only the CPU architecture and usually the GPU that's paired with it if it's a Mali. All the rest has historically been handled by custom memory maps that ARE in control of the SoC manufacturers, and they ARE motivated to make things unique to each SoC to keep poaching down. With things like SBSA, however, the mapping can be standardized so that you don't have to compile a custom system for each iteration.

0
0
JLV
Silver badge

Re: Google Need Them To

>>then Google can update literally everything

>Ah, but what can they practically update?

Ah, but what _will_ they _factually_ update? Not their own late 2013 Nexus 5, that's fer sure. Abandonware for a year already.

0
0
Linux

Next Gen

Continuing the choc' and lollies theme and needing one starting with 'P'; may I suggest 'Penguin', the well-known chocolate bar.

16
1
Silver badge
Meh

Re: Next Gen

I can think of other words beginning with 'P'...

Peanut Butter!

I'm waiting for them to put some 3D skeuomorphic renderings into the base system. At least some shadows around the buttons, for crying out loud!

until then... meh [and don't force me to download/upgrade unless I _WANT_ to dammit!]

1
6
Silver badge

Re: Next Gen

Continuing the choc' and lollies theme and needing one starting with 'P'; may I suggest 'Penguin', the well-known chocolate bar.

Good idea! ...

... but I would almost bet money that they go for "Popcorn". You read it here first!

7
0
Silver badge

Re: Next Gen

But I wouldn't really classify popcorn as a candy. At least Gingerbread can be classed as a sweet. My money's on Popsicle, and I had it right on Oreo.

2
1
Bronze badge

Re: Next Gen

Can they pick something that those bastards at Mondelez/Kraft don't make please. After reneging on their promise to keep the Somerdale factory open if they gained control of Cadbury I want nothing to do with Kraft/Mondelez.

1
0
Silver badge

Re: But I wouldn't really classify popcorn as a candy.

Froyo and honeycomb aren't really candy either though, and they've both been used.

0
0

Re: Next Gen

@bombastic bob

why are you always whinging on about 3D UI's ?

0
0
Anonymous Coward

awesome I cant wait for this latest version of android to run 10 times worse on the same hardware, nag me till I acidentally hit update and reduce some previously usable hadware to the capabilities of paperweight or doorstop.

8
8
Gold badge

I've recently upgraded some KitKat handsets to LineageOS, which is effectively Android 7.1, and I haven't noticed any drop in performance ... at all.

5
0
Silver badge

Already here

My Nexus 6P got the update last night.

0
1

Re: Already here

Mine (Pixel XL) had the update ready to go this morning. I've been using the beta for a while and it is a noticeable improvement on battery life and data usage.

0
1
Silver badge
Gimp

Re: Already here

I notice we both got downvotes. Looks like there's an Apple Fanboi in the room...

0
1
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

Oreo

Right again. I really should do the lottery this week.

1
0
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Oreo

Same here - I predicted "Nougat" correctly here a while back too. I think the next one could be "Peanut Brittle", or possibly something to do with pineapples if "brittle" gives the wring connotation.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Oreo

Peppermint (Pattie). You heard it here first.

0
0

Re: Oreo

I'm going with Popcorn. It's not sweet really, but it is snappy and sounds like something Google likes.

0
1
Silver badge

Re: Oreo

Nah, I say Popsicle.

0
1
Silver badge

Re: Oreo

Remember, Android 5 was Lollipop, so they've done generic treats on a stick before, and 4.0-4.1 was Ice Cream Sandwich and 2.2 was Frozen Yogurt, so they've also done cold stuff before.

0
0
Silver badge

ANSWER_PHONE_CALLS?

Why, in heaven's name? The only conceivable reason I can think of would be to automate 2FA; and realistically how many people use the 'Please phone me' option with that.

Balancing this against the massive potential for abuse; premium number callback and snooping to name the first things that come to mind..

17
0

Happy to let an app deal with my calls

Let it deal with "microsoft support", "you've had an accident", "ppi", "the mother in law support call", "wife"

If I could train it to speak and sound like me, I'm onto a winner

4
0

Oh when will Google allow us to revoke permissions to apps. If an app that has no business being able to send and receive texts or voice calls, or access mobile numbers etc. still lists them in their required permissions, we should bloody well be able to turn those permissions off.

4
10
Silver badge

> ANSWER_PHONE_CALLS? Why, in heaven's name?

An on-device answer-phone, perhaps?

9
0

Unless I'm misunderstanding what you mean, Google included the ability to set & revoke each app's permissions on a fine-grained level in Nougat. It works in the almost-stock version that came on my Moto E4, at least...

10
0

@Richard 81

You can. That functionality has been present for at least a couple of versions now.

10
0

Oh when will Google allow us to revoke permissions to apps.

I can't actually remember how long I have been able to do that, but it turned up in Android 6 (Marshmallow I think it was)

Maybe you need an OS update

2
0
Silver badge
Happy

Maybe you need an OS update

Well, they have an Android phone so the chance of it being up to date are pretty fucking slim....

1
1

Quote: Oh when will Google allow us to revoke permissions to apps.

Settings > Apps > Select an App > click Permissions.

You just turn on and off as you want. Obviously switching off a permission could break the app, but apps are required to play nice, and when launched, it should simply ask for the permission again if it really needs it.

Also permissions these days are on a 'when needed' basis. i.e. Apps should only ask up front for a specific permission, if that permission is needed immediately. Otherwise permissions should be asked for as needed.

As an example, I've got Amazon Shopping on my phone, it has 7 permissions listed, such as Camera, Contacts etc. Not one of them is enabled, as I've never used a feature than needed them (I just check orders, and occasionally buy something).

0
0

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017