back to article Just delete the internet – pr0n-blocking legislation receives Royal Assent

The Digital Economy Bill 2016-17 has received Royal Assent, and with Her Maj's rubberstamp it shall henceforth become a requirement for all pornography-serving websites to verify the ages (and thus identities) of all of their visitors in the UK. ISPs may be forced to block sites which fail to do so, and the fact that many such …

Anonymous Coward

Hardly surprising

Government suggests legislation. Consultation tells government idea is stupid.

Government ignores consultation and pursues legislation into law anyway. Congratulations democracy!

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Re: Hardly surprising

Such a waste of time.

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Fire up the VPN

We're going abroad

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Re: Hardly surprising

Congratulations democracy!

The worst form of government except for all the others.

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Re: Hardly surprising

"The worst form of government except for all the others."

Doesn't prevent democracy from being insufficient in and of itself, though.

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Re: Hardly surprising

"Government ignores consultation and pursues legislation into law anyway. "

And a short while later some MPs and civil servants involved all headed off to various dungeons for a spanking and domination.

Bloody hypocrits the lot of them. What is the hang up people have with sex? So its no big deal for kids to watch a stallone/vin diesel/van damme/arnie film and see people get blown to pieces and murdered in various unpleasent ways, or those rather graphic crash videos on youtube or live feed, no problemo! But some adults engaging in consensual sex acts? Quick, wall off the web, its a moral crisis! And while you're at it cover those piano legs!

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@tmTM -- Re: Fire up the VPN

"We're going abroad"

Choose wisely. It would appear that you lot managed to get this "approved" before our "wisdom" here in the States.

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Devil

Re: Fire up the VPN

There is not going to BE an "abroad" for much longer. Yes, it is currently still nearly trivial to skip into some different jurisdiction to escape any one particular decision, but the walls are closing in from all sides and all governments around the world are queuing up to take hints from each other on how to regulate and restrict internet access further and further. All the restrictions enforced through China's firewall weren't "a big deal" as long as VPNs were an option - then they flat out forbade those too and now they kinda are.

There is less and less time remaining for us to cryo-freeze someone so that in a hundred years he can say "back in my day we didn't need a special authorization to open up a blank browser page and another one to call up Google and another one to follow the result link" (and be promptly called a liar and get laughed at incredulously).

When do you think the American Wild West is going to come around again? Barring WWIII happening - NEVER. You have witnessed its online equivalent first-hand - cherish that opportunity, because none of your descendants will get to experience the non-locked-down non-spoon-fed non-sanitized version ever again. For their own good, natch.

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Re: Hardly surprising

Government suggests legislation. Consultation tells government idea is stupid.

Government ignores consultation and pursues legislation into law anyway.

Under the NZ National gubbermint it's more like "someone suggests legislation that hurts poorer people/increases wealth for the gubbermint's cronies/increases spying power/reduces rights, later that day it is passed under urgency".

Democracy? Just another thing national thinks should be banned.

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Re: Hardly surprising

You guys are no more a democracy than we are.

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Easy

Username: johnsmith

Password: password123

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Re: Easy

How'd you hack my details?

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Re: Easy

http://bugmenot.com/ - find & share logins, real useful for when you find that obscure/obselete driver file for that old bit of kit you have but the website you found it on requires signing up to access said file.

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Re: Easy

"bugmenot"

...was never of much use frankly. All the websites that you cared enough not to sign up for did in turn care enough to "opt out" of Bugmenot and because they did honour such an option, you got zilch. Lately, it has become utterly useless even against the "mildest" sites - I guess it's just slowly becoming sufficiently unpopular for any targeted sites to notice and ban logins much faster than new ones become available...

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Re: Easy

Indeed.

Maybe it isn't about the porn, but about getting another datapoint on people to help with mass surveillance.

Or maybe its just morality theatre.

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Oh how we laughed in NZ...

I live in the capital within sight of the parliament building... 6Mb/s and no chance of improvement for another 3 years!

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Pint

Re: Oh how we laughed in NZ...

I live in the capital within sight of the parliament building... 6Mb/s and no chance of improvement for another 3 years!

Not far away from you in Lower Hutt. Getting Fibre in my area now, another month or so. But I've known plenty of people on Fibre - use the Chorus/tele$cumSpark speedtest sites and WOW this is fast. Use anything else (other speedtest site, YouTube or other streaming), and it's a whole lot of expensive meh, probably faster on ADSL.

Got mates in Porirua who have to wait till 2019 to get Fibre or VDSL speeds, though admittedly their ADSL speeds are at the top of the range.

Funny. I remember not to many years ago (well, in the 80's/90's) how NZ had one of if not the best communications networks on the world. Amazing how much "privatisation" has advanced us! :(

Actually, your problem might be a physical as well as virtual wind problem. All the blow coming from the politicians is sucking up all the bandwidth!

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Devil

Well, looking forward to the data breach

That reveals which MP's and MP's family members are looking at pr0n.

And I guess you could cross reference that with the ICR database leak to see exactly what sites they are looking at.

In fact, maybe that legislation itself is some kind submissive/exhibitionist self abuse by conservative MP's!

In which case we should ban that filth.

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Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

It is a nouvelle form of a 3 line whip.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

"That reveals which MP's and MP's family members are looking at pr0n."

Nope. MPs (and their families and staff) are exempt from the provisions of the DEB and their ICRs are "expunged".

Perhaps there is some other way we can get at them? [Hack Icon Required]

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

That reveals which MP's [...] are looking at pr0n.

And I guess you could cross reference that with the ICR database leak to see exactly what sites they are looking at.

Well, they're MPs, so I'll take a wild stab in the dark and say "child pornography" for $500, there, Alex.

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Re: ban that filth.

Tory MPs? Fantastic idea!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: ban that filth.

"In which case we should ban that filth."

MPs ? Great idea. Not party specific - they're as bad as each other! Manifesto promise vs Daily Mail headine, both main party leaders chose the headlines over their own consituents' wishes, iirc.

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Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

"Nope. MPs (and their families and staff) are exempt from the provisions of the DEB and their ICRs are 'expunged'."

And were they able to explain, with a straight face, just why they should be exempt? (The cover reason: obviously there's going to be one rule for the elite and one for us plebes. Just unusual to have it written down explicitly.)

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Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

"MPs (and their families and staff) are exempt from the provisions of the DEB and their ICRs are "expunged"."

I fail to see how that can be possible. Presumably *everyone* is protected against arbitrary publication of their internet habits and equally presumably MPs and their families are trawled just the same as everyone else in the big dragnet collecting the data in the first place. Since any data breach is, by definition, something that shouldn't have happened, it is hard to understand how MPs' records are any less likely than mine to be included in such a breach.

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Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

"I fail to see how that can be possible."

It's as possible as every other fucking clueless desire that comes out of their empty heads.

They decided it would happen, therefore it will.

If we are lucky they will pass the "no gravity for MPs" bill in the next session...

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@spacecadet66 -- Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

And were they able to explain, with a straight face, just why they should be exempt? (The cover reason: obviously there's going to be one rule for the elite and one for us plebes. Just unusual to have it written down explicitly.)

The old chestnut of "research"... That's the excuse given by political types here in the States for all sorts of similar exemptions from various laws for themselves.

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Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

Of course, Labour politicians would never be caught doing anything that can bring themselves into disrepute, being so pious and pure.

Whilst I realise it's heartening to live in an echo chamber where you and your kind have screamed vocally how righteous your opinion is so that only similar voices to yours can be heard, thus legitimising your idiocy and validating your bigotry. But if live outside that echo chamber, people like you just look and act like total pricks.

The problem with just attacking the Tories on this issue is that you ignore the other parties policies, which, if you check, are just as fucked as the Tories.

I always question the sanity and intelligence of those who scream abuse at one group, whilst ignoring their own is equally as repugnant.

The words abject hypocrite and sanctimonious don't do it justice.

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Re: @spacecadet66 -- Well, looking forward to the data breach

I'll have to remember that for next time. "Yes, your honor, I did break into that car, but I was only doing research into what people keep in their cars."

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Re: Well, looking forward to the data breach

Nope. MPs (and their families and staff) are exempt from the provisions of the DEB and their ICRs are "expunged".

Is that a lifetime exemption including grandchildren as they grow up or is it just while they are "on the job" (fnarr fnarr)

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This is nothing to do with porn or child protection...

Remember when Cameron said that the police and security services needed - and would be given - the capability to know exactly which individual is using any internet-capable device at any given time?

Yeah. That.

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Anonymous Coward

Police state

That is because we are increasingly living in a police state, also an increasingly undemocratic one.

I refused to take part in that very same scheme for Spain, I told my company it was unethical, and my career stopped there.

In case you are wondering, yes, they do match all kind of data.. including mobile phone location and who is near you.. so even if you dont speak to then using internet/telephone, as you hang arround them, they know they are your friends...

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Re: Police state

Where's the age verification in Spain?

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Re: Police state

You could always hang out with me, off-property, of course. No mobile spying devices here ;-).

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Re: Police state

"You could always hang out with me, off-property, of course"

Remember that Bradbury novel where he's becoming suspicious for taking a walk on foot, without a car? I think he meant "(powered) phone", not "car". Why would "1984" be the only one that comes to pass...

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Re: Police state

That wasn't a novel. It was a short story called, "The Pedestrian." The man was taking a walk outside when everyone else was home watching TV. An automated police car happened upon him, questioned him, and demanded he climb inside to be taken for psychiatric evaluation.

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Anonymous Coward

'non-conventional'

Two points.

1. I'm sorry to be living in a place where the partially elected government thinks it can outlaw stuff (and I'm not just talking pron, anything) that's consentual but 'not conventional'. Who are they to say what's conventional or not? They only got 37% of the popular vote. Who do they think they are?

2. I'm happy to be in a world where thanks to technology, it's simple to get around any pathetic, impotent, Helen Lovejoy inspired laws they want to pass.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 'non-conventional'

"They only got 37% of the popular vote."

The FPTP system favours the two large parties. Even if Labour won - their authoritarian streak would be no different.

Only the Lib-Dems have shown any concern about privacy issues. No matter how well they might poll this time - they aren't going to win anything like a proportional number of seats.

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Re: Who do they think they are?

The Ruling Class. They're Tories, don't you know? Born to rule over us plebs etc...

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Re: 'non-conventional'

I do wonder what constitutes "non-conventional". For some in the fruitcase fraternity this presumably includes anything other than the missionary position: no more blow jobs and even having a wank could land you in hot water; female orgasms can go back to being mere myths.

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Re: Who do they think they are?

--The Ruling Class. They're Tories, don't you know? Born to rule over us plebs etc...

What a shame they are only capable of asset striping the country.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 'non-conventional'

"For some in the fruitcase fraternity this presumably includes anything other than the missionary position:"

...through a hole in their nightwear - with the lights out.

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Re: Who do they think they are?

The Ruling Class. They're Tories, don't you know? Born to rule over us plebs etc...

That was a good movie - one of finest Peter O'Toole performances. Any resemblance to some of the members of May's government is most likely purely coincidental.

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Big Brother

Re: 'non-conventional'

'I do wonder what constitutes "non-conventional".'

Sodomy, for starters. Which is insertion of the penis into any orifice other than a vagina. Yes, sodomy does legally include BJs.

However, titty-fucks do not consist of penetration of an orifice, so do not constitute sodomy. That's why they're classed as gomorrahy (which is similar to sodomy but in a different place). Definitely non-conventional. Even if you're married to Dolly Parton.

Since MPs created the law, their behaviour must define what is classed as conventional. So having sex with your own wife is also non-conventional.

And, by anybody's standards, watching grumble flicks of Donald J Trump being pissed on by Russian hookers is non-conventional squared. Getting turned on by watching it is non-conventional cubed.

Apropos of nothing at all, I had to laugh a year or two back when Tesco sold a yellow climbing rose called "Golden Showers." You can get them from the Royal Horticultural Society (amongst many other places) for only £14.99. I have no idea why I just thought of that.

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Re: The Ruling Class

Thank you for that. I'll fire up my VPN and go looking for it.

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Pirate

Re: The Ruling Class

"I'll fire up my VPN and go looking for it."

yeah, about that... ISP filtering doesn't work well when people have access to VPN or Tor. So as it is over here across the pond, a stupid law that tries to prevent people from doing things that fall under the blanket term "vice" ONLY punishes those who are willing to obey that law. And those who circumvent such things will simply laugh at it.

The USA had an "experiment" early back in the 20th century called 'Prohibition'. The rise of organized crime and widespread DISREGARD of the law (and unofficial increase in Canadian and Mexican liquor imports) drove its repeal a decade or so later.

A similar law was passed in the 1970s, restricting highway speeds to 55mph. It was widely violated as well. California highway speeds typically moved at 65-70mph while that law was in effect, and police knew that traffic moving along at the same speed was SAFER than randomly pulling people over and citing them for doing more than "the maximum speed". The 1990's power changeover in Congress, under Newt's leadership, REPEALED that [Reagan had orchestrated a partial-repeal in the 80's but couldn't pull off a full repeal - that took a majority in Congress].

Anyway those are TWO examples of attempts to legislate against the will of the people, and the LAUGHABLE and widespread willful disobedience of the law that resulted.

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Re: The Ruling Class

Ah, but China has shown a way to deal with VPNs. Just restrict ALL encrypted traffic that can't be decoded by the State. And if your system is able to parse other formats, you can also put a pinch on steganography. Control the points of ingress and egress, and you can prevent "conspirator" routers from helping as well.

Unlike with Prohibition, the borders CAN be patrolled pretty effectively if the State really got around to it.

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Re: The Ruling Class

It's getting too late for that now. It could have worked if it was put in place a few years ago, when almost everything on the internet was cleartext. But these days? Encryption is the default for a lot of things. Including this forum. Including all major websites, and most applications too. If you block everything that can't be read, you break the internet to a point that, even in a repressive state, the angry users are going to be a problem.

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Re: 'non-conventional'

>even having a wank could land you in hot water

Ugh, best avoid that. The lysis of the sperm cells in. pure water will render them extremely sticky and hard to remove. Soapy water is your friend. Er, so I'm told.

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Gimp

" and only a late addition to a fast-tracked piece of legislation. I"

The classic tactic for slipping in something the slipper knows is pure BS. You can smell the greasy fingerprints of the cabal at the Home Office all over this.

Age verification was the hobby horse of the woman MP CMD appointed Child Exploitation and Sexualization Tsar (not the current title but I found the original one far more amusing).

Y'know, the one who could not be arsed/work out how to set adult filtering on her browser.

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