back to article It gets worse – now WD says Toshiba memory business sale breaches joint venture terms

Just when you think it can't get any worse... it does. Western Digital has warned Toshiba that the proposed sale of its memory business contravenes the terms of their flash foundry joint venture. This NAND tech and products-based business has been set up as a separate company by Toshiba so that it can sell a large chunk for …

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US Nuclear Industry

Toshiba failed to do their 'due diligence' when they bought Westinghouse. The US nuclear industry has been in the toilet for decades with only real sales to the Navy. Worldwide the industry has not been very healthy. Partly the industry has been using the choice for reactor fuels and design since the 50's and partly because other options are cheaper and have easier environmental problems. Whatever you think of coal fired plants, the environmental problems are much easier to manage than with highly radioactive wastes with millenia for a half-life with uranium based cycle.

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Mushroom

Re: US Nuclear Industry

"Highly radioactive" wastes are those with a short half-life -- the longer the half-life, the less radiation it emits per unit time.

That's why you let the fresh waste sit for a few years/decades while the worst stuff decays, then put the much-less-radioactive remnant down a salt mine so it doesn't get into people's food and bodies.

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Krashzilla

NVM pricing already on way to bottom race. Toshy types thinking they will reap billions for this? Buy my Yugo, please!

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Bronze badge

Does Toshiba need new management or what?

Maybe Foxconn can buy out both Toshiba and WD... it sounds like they are prepared to overspend.

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This for reactors that are not CURRENTLY even needed...

In in Georgia (USA), we are already paying billions in cost overruns on this project... a project that was not wanted by consumers, and was not needed by the Southern Company. They (the Southern Company) jumped at the opportunity to build the first new nukes in many years in the U.S., and our own Public Service Commission gave them the green light and let them start collecting on the first billion of cost overruns. It is a fiasco that leaves Westinghouse bankrupt, leaves Toshiba in a precarious spot, and leaves Ga consumers (and not Southern Company investors) on the hook for two half built reactors.

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Joke

They make laptops and have no nuke buyers. So why not make nuke powered laptops? They'd never run down, and you'd never have to charge them.

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Anonymous Coward

And the keyboards would glow in the dark !

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Anonymous Coward

And .. if we could get Toshiba to sell to ISIS (or the current terrorist name of the month) just like Toyota sells to ISIS (or other terrorists) ... and we would be able to track them by the radiation trail.....

Brilliant... we could possibly get some extra $ from In-Q-Tel....

+++

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Anonymous Coward

I've heard this allegation before, and there doesn't appear to be any clear evidence that this was done with Toyota's knowledge, let alone cooperation.

My gut reaction- that this was more likely a reflection of Toyota's general popularity in such places due to their trucks and four-wheel-drives' reputation ruggedness and reliability in unforgiving conditions like that (#)- seems to have been broadly confirmed by this article.

(#) I first heard of this with reference to Toyota Land Cruisers' popularity in the Australian outback (where they actually use 4x4s for what they were intended for rather than just impressing the neighbours). In a place where getting stranded with an unreliable vehicle could cost you your life, it's perhaps not surprising that buyers there give less of a t**s about looks than suburban types bothered by the fact the Land Cruiser looks like a "parts bin special" versus the pretty but utterly unreliable Range Rover.

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