back to article Oracle crushes Apiary's hope in slightly awkward email to customers

Oracle today poured cold water on efforts by Apiary top brass to reassure customers about the future of its software under Big Red – the very same day Oracle's acquisition of Apiary concluded. In a February 22 email to customers, seen by The Reg, Apiary's founder and chief executive Jakub Nesetril and senior vice president of …

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Reading between the lines...

Your software and staff are history. Get your pink slips now.

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Re: Reading between the lines...

"Your software and staff are history. Get your pink slips now."

Yes, or "watch your fb feed for your employment status update, which we'll set for you. lol laterz"

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Reading between the lines...

If you are with Apiary, I'd suggest looking for work _outside Oracle_ now, because you may find the culture slowly poisonous/disillusioning, like I did.

Just like Micros, there will be no guarantees which products will be re-branded/assimilated, after possibly ages digesting the business, support will probably get migrated to a cheaper country with few experienced staff, with support snarl-ups, and probably most of the experienced staff will eventually be made redundant.

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Re: Reading between the lines...

"If you are with Apiary, I'd suggest looking for work _outside Oracle_ now, "

Might apply to customers using Apiary too?

I certainly prefer MariaDB to OracleDB (easier to calculate licence costs) and the shenanigans over Java (free vs pay $$$ parts) are scary.

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Re: Reading between the lines...

Might apply to customers using Apiary too?

Maybe time for all companies to reconsider, if they have built a business that has become critically dependent upon a particular piece of this party software, only to find that the original owner/developer gets inhumed in the SAP or Oracle software graveyards.

Most companies have forgotten that in-house developed software frees them from exorbitant licence fees that the acquisitive software houses have to charge to cover the ludicrous amounts of goodwill that their balance sheets get burdened with after serial acquisitions. In house development certainly isn't any bed of roses, but at least it means you have control over what it costs, how much is actually done by way of support, and how long the product is actually supported for.

It's curious: Almost anything else that's business critical has extensive alternative procurement strategies and careful risk management applied to it. But not third party software (or service outsourcing), where companies buy these in on the promise of improbable savings that then never occur, but then seem to be happy to be pillaged quarter after quarter. And of course, if you homebrew your software, you will only be on the hook for FX effects if you've CHOSEN to use offshore contract developers, rather than simply because some cash rich US corporation ups your licence fees solely to preserve its margins when measured in dollars.

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Re: Reading between the lines...

Correct.......standard Oracle acquisition model......worst in the industry.

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Re: Reading between the lines...

Indeed, a great company I worked at was assimilated into Oracle, amazing how fast the culture, enjoyment, pride etc was sucked right out.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Reading between the lines...

Oracle doesn't buy a company for their "culture". They want the products, patents and customers.

The "culture" must be destroyed because that will quickly prompt people to leave. That's cheaper than redundancies.

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Re: Reading between the lines...

Yep. First day after the Sun deal closed, every member of staff on our Sun campus was told, in person by the local Oracle suits, "make no mistake, this is an acquisition, not a merger. Welcome to Oracle."

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Reading between the lines...

Working at SAP, can say the acquistions (Concur, SuccessFactors, Ariba, Fieldglass, Sybase, BOBJ) work pretty solidly independently for many years, if not still. They weren't the "grab the tech and fire" jobbies but in some cases they even shut down the SAP competing products where those devs were integrated into the acquisition management and teams.

Acquisition is more than just tech: you need similar ethos and culture.

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Anonymous Coward

Standard Oracle Practice

Any future features/roadmaps are always blanketed with a large safe harbour advisory.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Standard Oracle Practice

Especially since this is the "quiet period" just before the end of quarter results are announced. Anyone making comments that could have financial implications will get their knuckles severely rapped.

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At least Oracle is being honest

At least Oracle is being honest with everybody.

Just in case you had any ideas that we actually cared about anything other than Extracting maximum money at all costs... NO!

Tough luck if you thought we'd do anything good with the product other than change the licensing terms to the most horrible possible to extract every last drop of money from you. We WON'T!

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We don't know what earn out the Apiary management were on, but Oracle have just killed any chance they had of making target. Expect a compromise agreement or court case.

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Ahhh sweet Larry, the thing that makes him a billionaire is the damn same thing that makes him a tosser.

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Standard safe harbour

The stuff about not making purchasing decisionso etc is oracles standard legal disclaimer they put on any product or slide that talks about roadmaps or future versions. It's not really slapping them down in an addendum, it's boilerplate text.

That being said the future of products acquired by oracle is never very clear.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Standard safe harbour

> the future of products acquired by oracle is never very clear.

True. It hovers between very dark grey and pitch black.

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Joke

Oracle certainly have the offensive bit right down, but I think they need to work on the charm bit of charm offensive.

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My first thought on reading the Oracle comment - and considering the 'price' - this is a buy out of (future) competition before it is real expensive, maybe find something to rebrand and sell as Oracle XXX.

I smiled at the comment: "make no mistake, this is ... not a merger. Welcome to Oracle"

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