back to article God save the Queen... from Donald Trump. So say 1 million Britons

More than a million Britons have signed an online petition begging the government to prevent American President Donald Trump from making a state visit to the United Kingdom. The petition, which the Monday-muddled hacks at The Register are guessing is the most popular to have ever graced the site, broke 1,000,000 signatures …

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Sadly

Given all the people she's had to meet in the past, I doubt Trump even makes her top 10 of repulsiveness.

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Re: Sadly

Perhaps not, but is meant to be the president of the US of A.

Not that he acts like it.

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Holmes

Re: Sadly

@AMBxx

I think we better wait until she's met him.

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Re: Sadly

Maybe not, but the top 10 are unlikely to try putting their hand up the skirt of her great-grandchildren's mother.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Sadly

are unlikely to try putting their hand up the skirt of her great-grandchildren's mother.

Neither is he. Not his type.

In any case, I would not worry about that. Any lady that has played hockey on grass can fend for herself. Someone stupid enough to try his luck uninvited will have his head removed.

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Re: Sadly

Any lady that has played hockey on grass can fend for herself.

My wife was ordered by her school to use a different hockey stick when she was young - her dad had repaired her gran's old hockey stick by the dint of screwing a metal plate to the short part of the stick. Apparently, it made a fairly good scythe..

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Re: Sadly

Not his type? Then that's ok. Whew! Imagine if she had been. Oh, then she'd have to defend herself. That makes for a fun party, the one where you constantly have to guard against being groped.

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Re: Sadly

I'd love to hear what Prince Philip has to say about him... this could be fun.

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Re: Sadly

Didn't Trump say he'd have screwed Diana? given half a chance? Perhaps Harry will go after him with a shotgun.

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Re: Sadly

are unlikely to try putting their hand up the skirt of her great-grandchildren's mother.

Neither is he. Not his type.

In any case, I would not worry about that. Any lady that has played hockey on grass can fend for herself. Someone stupid enough to try his luck uninvited will have his head removed.

Oh please please please please try....

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Re: Sadly

You guys still do the tower and axeman?

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Re: Sadly

"You guys still do the tower and axeman?"

Given the tenacity of British bureaucracy:

In some civil servant warren, there's an office with a desk, whose occupant shuffles in every day, and checks his memos.

Then strokes "Old Friend" hanging on the wall, and mutters, "Not today old friend, not today.", before taking it off its hooks for oiling and sharpening.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Sadly

Will Nigel Farage join Fox News soon enough for us to hear his perspective?

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I certainly signed the petition.

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Why, apart from virtue signalling that is?

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Signing Internet petitions is the 21st century equivalent of shouting at the telly. And about as effective.

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"Signing Internet petitions is the 21st century equivalent of shouting at the telly. And about as effective."

No, it's not.

It's the equivalent of signing a massive physical petition, as was done before the internet.

It will be presented to the relevant parties. It is reported in mainstream media. Nothing like you shouting at your telly.

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You mean the petition that he should try it out with Kate and get his head removed?

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"I certainly signed the petition."

Did you knit another stupid hat with pussy ears as well?

I bloody love Katie Hopkins:

http://www.lbc.co.uk/radio/presenters/katie-hopkins/petition-signers-are-as-empowered-as-an-eight/

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Just reading the URL, rather than clicking, I can just say that I didn't feel one bit empowered.

Does that answer you question?

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Anonymous Coward

Ironically, this puts the government in a bit of a quandry, as clearly Europe aren't going to want to trade with us, and we don't have too many other options, the US being one. Now if the PM follows the wishes of the people, and not allow Trump over here, that will likely damage our trade negioations with the US.

So it's basically ignore the people to get get a trade deal, and risk peeing off the people, or listening to the people and risking a US trade deal.

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I don't get how this is a problem for the government. So 1 million clicked on the petition. What about the rest of the population? Where is THEIR petition? Does it even exist?

I do understand that the 1M mark now requires Parliament to consider the petition, but are they not also tasked with considering the will of the other 63 million citizens?

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~I bloody love Katie Hopkins

Is she still here? I thought she promised to move to the US if Trump became POTUS. Come to think of it, Sadiq Khan won the London Mayor election and there's no sign of her running down the road bollock naked with a sausage up her arse.

One big difference between Hopkins and Trump then - at least he's making an effort to fulfill all his pre-Election promises.

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Re: we don't have too many other options

I'm not sure how the USA as a mainly service economy like our own could actually help.

It seems likely that all the businesses that rely on being inside the EEA will relocate so they remain within the EEA. We will be left with empty buildings and unemployed people.

The best we can hope for is for our current arrangements with America not to be victims of the America First policy.

I suspect Trump will simply come here for an ego trip, and we'll have to suck up to him to avoid losing our American trade. He knows this, and if May wants to walk away from our trade with Europe, she'll have to do it.

Personally I hope the petition gets big enough to make him have a hissy fit and cancel himself. Perhaps may will them rethink this insane hard brexit.

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Happy

>Signing Internet petitions is the 21st century equivalent of shouting at the telly. And about as effective.

I agree .... and .... I signed it as well ... not that I see the royals as anything other than bloodsuckers. I am an atheist, so the "They are the earthly representation of god" makes no sense to me, which, basically, disqualifies them from any prerogative they claim to have. However, I would not want Trump to mate with May, which might have already happened, she has been to the US, right ? I digress ... anyway, we have enough excrement in our country with May alone, no need for another helping!

Fellow Brits, as is customary with me, you know where the down-vote button is ... I have 2:1 upvotes vs downvotes and I would like to inverse that so .... be my guest!

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"I do understand that the 1M mark now requires Parliament to consider the petition, but are they not also tasked with considering the will of the other 63 million citizens?"

You raise an interesting point here. In last year's EU Referendum, I do understand that the 33.5M turnout now requires Parliament to take us out of the EU, but are they not also tasked with considering the will of the other 13 million citizens?

You can't have it both ways.

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@Hans1 - How about trying out: 'Constitutional monarchy' is tried and tested and probably one of the least worst (if not the least worst) options on the table. Having a 'president' is no guarantee against bloodsucking asshattery, or any of the other options designed to limit over weening power greed and idiocy.

If you have a significantly better alternative, let's being having it, with reasons.

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@anonymous boring coward

"It's the equivalent of signing a massive physical petition, as was done before the internet.

It will be presented to the relevant parties. It is reported in mainstream media."

It will then be totally ignored by the relevant parties, as was done before the internet.

(See Petitions Committee response to 250,000 signatures calling for further debate on the IP Act)

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@AC

"So it's basically ignore the people to get get a trade deal, and risk peeing off the people, or listening to the people and risking a US trade deal."

Not having a US trade deal sounds good to me, given that a Trump-inspired, May-negotiated trade deal will be basically "Pay over the odds for any dangerous crap that the US wants to sell you stupid Limeys, and in return we'll buy all our stuff in the good old US of A. Yay! USA, Number 1!, "

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> "...are they not also tasked with considering the will of the other 13 million citizens?"

No.

And you know perfectly well why not. Those people chose not to vote. Yet somehow you expect others to respect that non-event? Aren't you the desperate one.

Bottom line, your 'both ways' argument doesn't exist.

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"Is she still here? I thought she promised to move to the US if Trump became POTUS"

I don't love her for being honest or keeping promises. I love her for the way she rants and for mostly being right.

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"What about the rest of the population? Where is THEIR petition?"

There isn't one supporting the invitation. What does that tell you?

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"not that I see the royals as anything other than bloodsuckers"

So what sort of head of state would you prefer? The sort of product of the sort of process we've see in the US?

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@Doctor Syntax "So what sort of head of state would you prefer? The sort of product of the sort of process we've see in the US?"

Removing the royal element does not automatically mean we will be a republic operating the way the USA operates. Other republics exist in the world which in no way resemble that of the USA.

Why can't we have a prime minister, just as we have now, without the Royal barnacles clinging to the hull weighing us down?

In fact why can't we have a prime minister tempered by the proportional representation of the other parties involved? And if stalemate is achieved, so what? It would prevent one side or the other from fiddling with things and trying out their latest crack pot theories - EG Education is in constant flux as each party continuously tries to fix it according to their current ideology. Stalemate might force them to make a bit more effort to achieve consensus and allow society to remain more stable for longer and let it catch its breath before the next wave of ideological tinkering occurs.

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Are you suggesting that

We should hold another referrendum just to find out what the whole country wants to do about Trump?

Generally, if people care enough - they sign a petition - so, if enough people want him to have a state visit, they will start a petition asking for him to be invited.

If no-one cares enough, or even thinks that - they don't bother.

So, we have one petition saying 'don't invite him' - if you want you can ask someone else from the UK to start a second petition saying 'do invite him' and then we can see how it goes.

But tbh, i reckon the vast majority of the 63 millions just don't care enough to bother with either petition.

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Re: Are you suggesting that

I too thought of a Trump visit referendum, but if the people are going to be asked to decide every issue of state, then what good is having a government?

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Anonymous Coward

It will then be totally ignored by the relevant parties, as was done before the internet.

Hang on, where's that British bloody mindedness gone? Surely if it gets ignored you just file it again and keep doing that until they realise it isn't going to be allowed to be pushed under the rug?

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There is now a petition supporting the state visit; it's at 3,132 signatures having collected 2,136 in the last hour. So I assume it's a bit more than an hour old. Making any potential comparisons a little premature.

I signed the no-state-visit petition because it's a way to express sentiment that passes before the government's eyes. I'll have an infinitesimal effect, but it took a negligible amount of time. So the return on my time investment is acceptable.

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"Why can't we have a prime minister, just as we have now, without the Royal barnacles clinging to the hull weighing us down?"

I suppose we could, but without the Royal barnacles our head of state would either be that prime minister or a barnacle chosen from the same pond or a barnacle chosen by popular vote on a Saturday evening TV show.

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Anonymous Coward

"as clearly Europe aren't going to want to trade with us". Where did you get such a stupid idea from?, aren't?.

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"Signing Internet petitions is the 21st century equivalent of shouting at the telly."

One is a public action and the other is private. If you can't tell the difference you need to be very careful about what you do where.

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"Why can't we have a prime minister, just as we have now, without the Royal barnacles clinging to the hull weighing us down?"

There are two distinct roles, head of government and head of state. We keep them separate. The US doesn't. I'm surprised at that. At the time of the revolting colonials we'd already separated them. I find it odd that the US should, in the name of democracy, have devised a system that doesn't. They have checks and balances in that the legislative body can counter the head of govt & state. However, as far as I've seen, the most they can do is impose paralysis in most circumstances with impeachment as the only option. We have a situation whereby Parliament can, by a vote of confidence, provoke a general election and, less drastically, the cabinet (senior members of the majority party, which largely amounts to the same thing) can effectively remove the head of government.

We certainly don't have, as May has discovered, an equivalent of the Executive Order.

And having removed the monarch from active politics we have a non-political head of state which I think is a good thing although it's certainly cruel and unusual punishment to put anyone in the position of having to soldier on with no chance of retirement.

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Joke

I actually quite enjoy shouting at the telly from time to time. A bit of a variant of punching a sack of potatoes like the Silastic Armourfiends of Striterax, as an alternative to the healthy and natural channeling of aggressive instincts in deeds of senseless violence.

Doffs hat (roo leather Barmah today) to the late, great Douglas Adams

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Happy

Now Doctor, don't drop your syntax.

"So what sort of head of state would you prefer? The sort of product of the sort of process we've see in the US?"

If you want to compare "head of state" in the USA and the UK it's about the president and the prime minister, Trump and May. And you know it very well and I believe most Americans know it too.

Kings and Queens in Europe have no power and are on the whole accepted, it's about tradition and while there is a certain cost to it, there is also some on the plus side. You could, in a way, compare the Queen to the Eiffel tower in Paris. Our friends in Paris won't chop it down because of the costs as they know there are very similar "somethings" on the plus side.

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<i>It will then be totally ignored by the relevant parties, as was done before the internet.</i>

Considering the British majority style electoral system, it's no better than your democracy then.

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Obviously you dont understand the concept of a majority.

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Re: the other 63 million citizens

"are they not also tasked with considering the will of the other 63 million citizens?"

Those silent or non-voting types weren't considered on Brexit, so why here?

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kate?

pippa, surely...mmmmm

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@abc

(about online petitions)

"It's the equivalent of signing a massive physical petition, as was done before the internet.".

Not per definition, not even close even.

The problem lies in the details: how the petition is carried out. Not many people who open such petitions also have the technical know-how to prevent abuse. You know: signing the petition multiple times using all the e-mail aliases you have for example. And speaking of which: what about actually verifying the validity of an e-mail address?

I know: let's request people to register prior to signing. All it takes is one valid e-mail address. Here we go again.

Maybe one sign per IP address? But that would deprive your family from signing. Or worse: those who know how public VPN's work will once again have plenty of ways to sign multiple times.

Online petitions are by far the same as physical ones.

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Pirate

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/178844

yup

sure does

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/178844

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