back to article Going shopping for a BSOD? We've found 'em in store at M&S

Every time the BSOD flood seems to taper off, yet another bunch arrive in the Vulture South inbox, and for some reason the latest crop seems to have a retail theme. reader "Ozzard", for example, fired in the BSOD below, spotted in a Marks & Spencer, and since it's the right shape for the top spot, here it is. BSOD at Marks …

Facepalm

The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

I realize not everyone is old enough to have seen one, but that is a PC boot screen just after POST with a listing of the hardware addresses and devices handled by the BIOS.

I miss those days.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

To this day I don't know what pool data is.

Remember the ASUS motherboards that had audio POST (like...2001, 2003 at latest)

"computer performing power on self test" then "computer now booting from operating system" in a mobile-phone grade voice. Given that's all it ever said it was actually a rather pointless feature.

I think I've got that AMD chip of mine still on a shelf...you know back when things were competative. I wish I wasn't a child through the interesting not-cloud-powered era of software and hardware, RISC chips that were not arm or shit (Itainium, with it's "let's make a compiler try and do an NP problem" - DID NO ONE FUCKING REALISE?)

Putting the coward into AC.

AC

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

Yep, one can see the bottom line reads SYSLINUX, which is a boot-loader for floppies, CD-ROMs and PXE.

The photo shows mention of a 2004MB (WOW!!) disk drive on the secondary IDE controller… and mention of both USB 1.1 and 2.0 … so me thinks this is a 2003-2004 era PC in the throws of initially booting up.

"computer performing power on self test" then "computer now booting from operating system" in a mobile-phone grade voice. Given that's all it ever said it was actually a rather pointless feature.

Yep, had a P4 motherboard with that feature… it'd chatter away first reporting "No IDE Hard Drives Detected!" … well duh… it inherited the SCSI drives from the blown up dual P-Pro it replaced!

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Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

Yes, it's just booting. Whether it's actually stuck at this point due to some hardware/corruption failure only the photographer can tell us.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

I remember those motherboards when I used to build systems though I used to think they missed a trick and should have used things like "You forgot to plug the memory in you clown" or "I'm confused there is a graphics card in the pci slot but I have a graphics on board" and the classic "I'm not compatible with that shit so you need to unplug it or I ain't gonna boot until you upgrade my bios"

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Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

And this is supposed to be a tech (online) rag, and it's been mentioned before. Does rather make you wonder about the falling standards of technical "journalism" these days.

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Silver badge
Trollface

Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

Ah yes, the same one that in the right circumstances could produce the classic "Keyboard not found... press F1 to continue" and just sit there ad-nauseum whilst you went off hunting for a suitable one (especially given in some cases the machine hadn't got around to loading the USB drivers yet either thus requiring a PS1 beast).

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Coat

Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

especially given in some cases the machine hadn't got around to loading the USB drivers yet either thus requiring a PS1 beast

Is that a PS/2 keyboard that's been chopped in half?

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Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

falling standards?

It's not been the same since the moderatrix left.

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Bronze badge

Re: The second photo is not a Linux error screen.

It was "Strike F1 to continue ..." thus inspiring the (marginally later) variant:

"User error ... Strike user to continue"

which the marketing droids insisted we remove from our software. I am sure it cut down on the support calls, and I seriously doubt it affected sales.

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Facepalm

Not for sale

Re Timex Sinclair 1000 in a shop window.

I've never understood why shopkeepers display things that they aren't prepared to sell. 'Ooh sorry, you can't have that, it's on display.' If they want to just display stuff they should open an art gallery.

I've frequently sent members of staff from my friendly-neighbourhood comic shop (Hi Worlds Apart!) into the window display to get the last copy of 'Captain Neutron and The Star Wranglers'. They seem to have a grasp on how a retail store makes money.

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Pint

Re: Not for sale

"Timex Sinclair 1000"

I have one kicking around here somewhere. NTSC version.

Are they valuable?

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Re: Not for sale

Not particularly, at least not in the UK as they were rather too common. They're worth a good deal more than scrap, but not going to make anyone rich.

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Re: Not for sale

Especially in Dundee, where they used to make them... (and where they used to "fall off the back of lorries" regularly)

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Re: Not for sale

Re: "I've never understood why shopkeepers display things that they aren't prepared to sell."

Because they grew up watching Bagpuss:

" It was rather an unusual shop because it didn't sell anything"

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MAF
Paris Hilton

Re: Not for sale

Try Fleabay: www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vintage-Timex-Personal-Computer-Sinclair-1000-16k-RAM-Module-Manuals-/252637396528?hash=item3ad25cbe30:g:9wEAAOSwHMJYKzaT

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Not for sale

"I've never understood why shopkeepers display things that they aren't prepared to sell. 'Ooh sorry, you can't have that, it's on display." -- The Prof.

Yeah I've had no luck asking to buy their shelving, cash registers and attractive female staff.

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Is a Windows Update message in a PC store an "error"?

Surely that's working as it should.

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I'm surprised to see the words 'Windows' and working in the same sentence ( at least with out the words not or doesn't or never in there too)

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Devil

Is a Windows Update message in a PC store an "error"?

Depends on how many months it lasts...

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During the Windows Update installation process, your computer is not "working". It is twiddling its thumbs. So are you. "Work" ideally resumes once the update is updated and the computer is rebooted. Until the next time.

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Silver badge

Surely that's working as it should.

No it is not ... it should install the updates, restart any software that needs restarting and only ever reboot if the kernel was updated, like civilized OS' do, the most civilized OS out there does not even need to reboot to switch kernels... With Windows it is 30 minute waits for installation, 4 reboots, and another 30 minutes wait for configuration ... by no means something I call working as it should. ... if you do, what are you doing in the industry ? If MS were in the F1 industry taking two minutes to change the tires on a F1 car during a race you would understand ... in Linux, the TITSUP after an update lasts mere millis, restarting the software compare that to one hour on Windows ... and that it is your lucky and it does not bail out during installation or configuration ...

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It is now safe to turn off your computer

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Anonymous Coward

You could try going to Swindon :)

I haven't found many reasons to go to Swindon, but there is one: its Computer Museum. If I recall correctly, they may have days where you can actually use the kit they still have working (not sure, but you can always ask).

I donated a couple of rare items myself and I still have an pretty near pristine condition Roland A3 flatbed plotter in a box that I need to take along the next time I go there (it's too heavy to ship :) ).

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Thumb Up

Re: You could try going to Swindon :)

This November I ended up at a Halloween Party with the Curator of that very museum.

Me(Death) and him (Shrek) had a very interesting chat about computing and programming before the wailing of the ladies who had found SingStar made conversation difficult.

Got an invite to a BTS tour when I can round up my Nieces and Nephews to go and see it next time i'm down that way.

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Anonymous Coward

London Waterloo

Is a hotbed of BSODs. I see at least one a month.

Ive never got a camera handy though.

Ive seen some awesome errors on that massive advertising board as well.

South West Trains departure boards often produce interesting errors as well. Specifically blurting out the serial configuration for the display panels.

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Silver badge

Re: London Waterloo

I've never got a camera handy though.

What, do you not own a smartphone? you luddite, you.

:)

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Facepalm

The problem with linking to stuff on Twitter:

"for @R_Chirgwin's stamp collection pic.twitter.com/jUG2HtGG0t"

"This account's Tweets are protected.

Only confirmed followers have access to @sylmobile's Tweets and complete profile. Click the "Follow" button to send a follow request."

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Not really a BSOD either but...

I kind of liked it. A whole bunch of screens in the (old) Bangkok airport whining about detected duplicate IP addresses. Makes you wonder...

I must have the picture somewhere, but where?

P.S. I must admit that I was too rather shocked to see a BIOS POST screen called a "BSOD" here on El Reg. Guess that it's no longer so much a tech site :-/

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