back to article Samsung patches Galaxy Note 7 to not explode as two-thirds of phones recalled

Samsung is issuing a software update to all its Galaxy Note 7s across Europe, limiting the maximum battery charge to 60 per cent, in an attempt to quell its explosive safety issues. This month Samsung announced it will permanently discontinue its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after multiple reports of the devices exploding and …

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Hmmm

Point 1 - The user doesn't have to accept the update so it's a half arsed measure.

Point 2 - Why don't Samsung either use their "back door" to remotely disable the devices or just get the carriers to block the IMEI?

It seems they are fannying about with this when more direct action is needed.

These handsets are bloody dangerous and although it is the owners responsibility to hand it back Samsung don't really seem to be forcing the recall.

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Re: Hmmm

I would say that consumer laws would - ironically - forbid them from doing so.

And with the many lawsuits already coming their way for the exploding parts, I suppose they're not willing to open new litigation avenues.

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Re: Hmmm

Just curious when has any company forced a recall? In the grand scheme of things hoverboards seem far more dangerous and widely deployed than note 7s.

I don't recall any time when a vendor forced a recall of some kind but perhaps it has happened.

Do note 7 owners get any notification on the device itself that it should be recalled? On one of my note 3s it has been asking me for over a year to agree to new terms an conditions and privacy agreements etc. A message pops up in the android notification area to do so. I do not agree so i just close it and it asks again in a day or so.

I recall there being a change in the new phones where the battery meter was a different color. Have not yet heard of persistent notifications of the recall being embedded in the device itself though. Obviously the capability is there.

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Re: Point 2

I suspect that Samsung doesn't want to grossly announce to the public that they can actually do this. I mean, sure, they can do it, and we know they can do it, but they don't want to be screaming on the front page "We can brick anyone's or everyone's phone whenever we want, it's not really your phone."

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Re: Hmmm

I'd love to reside in your ivory tower.

Meanwhile back on planet earth Samsung is navigating the myriad of local and international consumer laws the best it can.

I think the only truly negative thing you can say about them is that they took too long to react when the problem first appeared and we're too quick to say they had identified the cause of the fault.

However once they got their thumbs out of their collective arses I think they did and are doing everything they're legally allowed to do.

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Re: Hmmm

Do note 7 owners get any notification on the device itself that it should be recalled?

Yes. Samsung sent notifications to remind to return the device.

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Re: Hmmm

I think the only truly negative thing you can say about them is that they took too long to react when the problem first appeared and we're too quick to say they had identified the cause of the fault.

Too long to react? How so? The device had been out less than a week and (at least in the UK) wasn't yet generally available and only people who had pre-ordered had a device.

I do agree that they were too quick to claim to have identified the problem and shipping new devices out. Given the issue seems to be more likely to be related to charging hardware rather than battery (Li-Ion is rather sensitive to ovevercharging/incorrect charging voltage) the end result would most likely have been the same, full recall.

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Re: Hmmm

Going to be interesting when self driving car vendors force a recall. Thousands of them lining up and heading for the factory.

Was that a real recall or has the BOFH done his thing again?

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Interesting approach

So... a phone that may catch fire when charging... what will we do... make it so people have to charge it more frequently? Excellent idea.

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Re: Interesting approach

Excellent indeed, since all of: battery wear, probability and the severity of fire are proportional to the amount of energy held by the battery. If battery charging is capped to 60% this makes the potential fire less severe and significantly less probable. Not to mention giving the owner the nudge to finally have the blasted phone replaced.

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Re: Interesting approach

"This new battery software update is specifically designed to remind all Galaxy Note 7 customers to replace their device at their earliest possible convenience through their local Galaxy Note7 Replacement Programme while they still have one ear left."

Fixed That For Them

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Anonymous Coward

Gotta wonder...

Is it possible that the abused employees were able to work this out to bring attention to their abuse and the company allowing it to happen? That this is their payback to the company and managers that were supposed to take care of them? To not beat and berate them like slaves?

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Bah!

Dibbalah san! About this phone you sold me ...

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Don't you wonder?

What really caused this scandal? Software or hardware? Really mysterious thing is the switch of battery factory and it seems battery isn't the issue.

IMHO the industry should have investigated it just like a jet crash. If it isn't truly solved, LG or Apple could face the same thing and it risks human life.

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Anonymous Coward

60%?

So overcharging is the culprit?

There must be something lost in translation in Korea.

Samsung, just to clarify when Apple overcharges they simply overprice their products its got nothing to do with batteries.

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learning lessons

"This new battery software update is specifically designed to remind all Galaxy Note 7 customers to replace their device at their earliest possible convenience through their local Galaxy Note7 Replacement Programme.

Sounds like they've got the Windows 10 ad team on the job.

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Meanwhile...

Samsung tries to limit the damage and the iPhone 7 effect by pre-announcing the Galaxy 8 months ahead of its release.

Roll-up, Roll-up, get your Galaxy 8 at 50% off. For Note 7 owners only.

This is gonna hurt their results for another year.

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Now if only Samsung would answer the phone, or answer emails, or turn up when they said a week ago to collect the replacement unit that is now sitting in my garage.

And, refund me, of course. And, even, maybe refund the accessories that I've been unable to return. And, perhaps, maybe some compensation too for a couple of months of hassle, recalls, battery limitations, airlines telling me to turn it off, notifications telling me that it's faulty, dated loss each time I switched, etc...

Xda developers note 7 UK site is full of others also waiting, also not getting any response... Way to go Samsung at killing your brand.

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Coat

I remember seeing an advert on TV for the Galaxy Note 7 a week or so ago, where it says that it can be submerged in water for around 30m and still be usable.

And I remember thinking at the time "Wow, that's useful to know for when it randomly catches fire..."

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Only in Europe? I thought this beast was sold world-wide.

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Baffles me why a third of owners appear to be quite happy with a phone that may spontaneously combust at any time

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Look at Paul Hargreaves points:

'Now if only Samsung would answer the phone, or answer emails, or turn up when they said a week ago to collect the replacement unit that is now sitting in my garage.

And, refund me, of course. And, even, maybe refund the accessories that I've been unable to return. And, perhaps, maybe some compensation too for a couple of months of hassle, recalls, battery limitations, airlines telling me to turn it off, notifications telling me that it's faulty, dated loss each time I switched, etc...

Xda developers note 7 UK site is full of others also waiting, also not getting any response... Way to go Samsung at killing your brand'

A large number of Note 7 owners had been waiting for this phone for some years and have been worn down by the recnt situation. When it's returned users don't have a direct alternative so will need to get a S7 and tie themselves to it for probably two years. Why do this when a Note 8 may come out later next year?. Samsung need to put something better on the table to encourage Note 7s to be handed back, they have shafted their most loyal users. I am fortunate that I still have my Note 3 so have bough a spare battery and no doubt will hand my Note 7 back at some point but it's such a great phone that I don't want to give it up.

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Anonymous Coward

>Now if only Samsung would answer the phone [...]

Can't. Exploded...

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Flame

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 - the new Darwin Award.

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The truth about the recall in France.

You article lacks important information. Let me enlighten you. I am still in possession of a Note 7. I bought it on preorder through the phone network SFR in France. For the record the phone in my possession is my 2nd unit after the recall. I have acted as advised by Samsung every step of the way and yet I still have my phone and I am still using a truly awful loan phone from SFR. Why? Because Samsung stalling and incompetence. Since 11th October I have been instructed to call Samsung, then SFR, then Samsung to organise an exchange or refund. I have also attempted 3 SFR shops. I have not be able to return my Note7. For the first time I received a call from Samsung defining my options: 1) Get a refund and leave myself approximately 360EUR out of pocket (the SFR subsidy for the handset which I pay through my tarif), or 2) Recieve an S7 Edge (only - no alternatives) and get an SFR store credit for the difference in price - a difference they wouldn't quantify. I don't want a store credit and I was given no assurances that I would be released from my SFR contact. Neither option is remotely satisfactory and no compensation of any sort has been offered. Note that the last 7 phones I have purchased were: S2, S3, Note 2, A5, Note 4, Note 7. My loyalty has been clear. Where is Samsung's? I would be happy to provide you a more detailed account of my experiences dealing with Samsung France if you'd like.

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