back to article Swedish appeals court upholds arrest warrant for Julian Assange

A Swedish appeals court has upheld the European Arrest Warrant for Julian Assange, who is sought in the country on allegations of rape, which he denies. Assange had sought to appeal the warrant for his arrest, though not the charges, as a means of achieving escape from the Ecuadorian embassy where he has been holed up now for …

Page:

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    The 8th, but not the last..

    Assange's lawyers have argued that his stay in the embassy amounts to arbitrary detention. They are matched in this claim by the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD), which found earlier this year that Assange was being detained arbitrarily.

    This is exactly what keeps this saga ongoing (and, of course, the lawyers in salary and publicity - the true name of the game). Assange is not detained in that embassy. He can walk out any time, day or night, and face the music like anyone else - and that's the real issue, he'd rather not.

    There is nobody who prevents him from walking out of there, as a matter of fact, there are quite a few people wishing he did..

    1. Chris Miller

      Re: The 8th, but not the last..

      And even if the Swedes withdraw their charges (or they expire), the British authorities will want to talk to Assange about breaking his bail conditions - a serious offence.

      1. Peter2 Silver badge

        Re: The 8th, but not the last..

        Google the maximum penalty. CPS guidelines say 6 months if a magistrates court does a summary conviction or 12 months in the case of a Crown Court doing it. Plus losing the bail bond that was put up by his mates, but that's unlikely to worry him that much given that he didn't pay it.

        He'd get more than that if they decide to charge him with contempt of court, hold him in prision until the case is heard (obvious flight risk?) and then stick his case at the bottom of the priority list.

  2. JimmyPage Silver badge
    Stop

    Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

    The only thing (well, one of the only things) which has remained constant -at least as far as I can see - in this entire sorry saga, is the lack of any concrete steps by the US to show even the slightest bit or interest in Assange (c).

    Yes, there has been a lot of blustering from politicians.

    But is there a *US* warrant for his arrest ?

    Has the US even begun extradition proceedings ?

    Are people aware that in the event Assange (c) is extradited to Sweden, he could not thence be extradited to the US without explicit (and unlikely) UK permission ?

    I know there's a lot of paranoia about the US, but they are not going to risk the cosy UK-US extradition agreement (which would be in tatters if they snatched Assange (c) from Sweden) for the likes of Assange (c) who - willingly if not arbitrarily - is slipping into the back pages of the 2000s, and only has himself to blame.

    He's starting to remind me of those Japanese soldiers that disappeared into Pacific islands in 1945, only to emerge in the 1970s and discover the world has moved on.

    It's been a while since we've had a poll for new El Reg icons. Can I suggest "Oh Do Fuck Off" for the next round ?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      But is there a *US* warrant for his arrest ?

      Mr Assange is worried that he will be [cough-cough] spirited away in the dead of night the US and would end up at some rendition camp in a god awful bit of the world. Why?

      He's embarrassed the USA so many times they need to get their revenge in one way or another.

      Like ot hate him, no one deserves that. If he is to spend time in clink then it should be after due legal process.

      Personally, I think he's a bit of a pratt and that's all.

      Well, that's my opinion

      1. 142

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        Though, if we're talking about *extrajudicially* spiriting him away in the middle of the night, surely that's just as likely from UK or Equador, as Sweden.

        1. Mage Silver badge

          Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

          Much LESS likely from Sweden.

          Why was he in the UK at all, if he was worried about USA?

      2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "He's embarrassed the USA so many times they need to get their revenge in one way or another."

        Which they're doing very successfully. He's imprisoned himself, at the expense of the Ecuadorians and ourselves. And his ego is being injured by not being taken seriously by them.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      Um, what?

      "lack of any concrete steps to show even the slightest bit of interest in Assange (c)"

      Uh-huh, USGov is perfectly happy to let someone accused of leaking so many secrets wander around scot-free and have no intention of having a quiet word in his ear.

      "begun extradition proceedings"

      Yup, cos nobody was ever picked up off the streets and sent to Guantanamo Bay without the full and proper legal process being observed.

      "not thence be extradited to the US without explicit (and unlikely) UK permission"

      Not only the same answer as the question above, but also why is it unlikely the UK would allow him to be sent? UKGov has been more than happy to hand people over in the past, with far less evidence of wrongdoing. Assange is not a UK-vian and he has freely admitted to whistle-blowing (as he puts it) - or data theft (as USGov describes it). Whatever "special relationship" it was that used to exist between the UK and the US is currently broken, written off by people who think sound-bite politics is more important than like-minded people working together. Whether it can be repaired or not remains to be seen.

      Criminals decide that the restrictions placed upon their actions for the protection of others by the law of the land do not apply to them so why should they feel entitled to any legal protection themselves? You either accept and live within the law or you don't accept it and live outside it - but don't start crying if you suddenly realise what a crock of sh** you have landed yourself in by claiming the law doesn't apply to you. If you break the law, you shouldn't expect the law to protect you.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "UKGov has been more than happy to hand people over in the past, with far less evidence of wrongdoing."

        Elsewhere on El Reg today:

        Lauri Love extradition A-OK

        1. Matt Bryant Silver badge
          FAIL

          Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

          "".....with far less evidence of wrongdoing."...." Puh-leeeease! That (IMHO) waste of oxygen Lauri Love has so much evidence against him he wasn't even bothering to try denying what he did, he was just trying to get his trial and inevitable conviction in the UK because he thought the UK courts will go much, much easier on him. As it stands, he can still appeal the case he just lost, plus appeal to the Home Office, and then appeal to the courts in Europe. Lauri Love isn't going anywhere for a while yet, but it is looking more and more likely he is just delaying his trip to the States.

        2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

          Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

          "Elsewhere on El Reg today:

          Lauri Love extradition A-OK"

          Exactly. And look how long it's taken. Along with similar cases where the accused has not been extradited after even longer judicial processes. Assange really has very little to worry about a US extradition from the UK. After all, he'll have to serve his sentence for absconding while on bail first and that is looked on VERY dimly by UK judges. From what I've seen of Swedish justice, it seems just as unlikely they would extradite hom to the US. Assuming that at some stage the US actually makes a request for extradition, which they seem to be showing little interest in doing. After all, they could have made that request while Assange was still in Sweden before any of the current shenanigans even began.

      2. HereIAmJH

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "Uh-huh, USGov is perfectly happy to let someone accused of leaking so many secrets wander around scot-free and have no intention of having a quiet word in his ear."

        Except that Assange didn't leak anything. He published documents that were leaked by Manning. And Manning is spending the next 35 years in Leavenworth Prison. He/She has currently just ended a hunger strike to force the Gov't to pay for sex reassignment surgery.

        Personally, I think extradition would be tough. Assange not a US citizen. He didn't hack any US servers. Proving jurisdiction on a crime seems to be a stretch. And rendition of a public figure would lead to too many questions about black ops.

        1. People's Poet

          Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

          "Personally, I think extradition would be tough. Assange not a US citizen. He didn't hack any US servers. Proving jurisdiction on a crime seems to be a stretch. And rendition of a public figure would lead to too many questions about black ops."

          Are you kidding me? You can break US law from within the UK and still get sent to prison on the US after being extradited.

          https://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/feb/11/businessman-extradited-iran-arms-sale-charges

          For selling batteries!!!

          1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge
            Boffin

            @People's Poet ... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

            Learn the law.

            Publishing... the leaks... he has some legal protection and it wouldn't be worth the effort.

            Assisting Manning... that's a different story.

            BTW, I think you need to understand what said batteries are used for as to why it was illegal.

          2. blame.exe

            Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

            Some recent news coverage of two different individuals who have never been in the US and yet are facing deportation to the USA. One was Kim dotcom and the alleged owner of Kickass Torrents. I do find the idea that a country would extradite a citizin or anyone for that matter to a country they have never been a seriously disturbing prospect.

            If I recall correctly Kim Dotcom living in New Zealand has had his assets siezed and is treated as being a fugitive as he is fighting extradition.

        2. PNGuinn
          Joke

          Except that Assange didn't leak anything

          I thought that was what the whole Swedish warrant was about in the first place?

          1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge
            Facepalm

            At PNGuinn ... Re: Except that Assange didn't leak anything

            Ah but wrong.

            He wasn't fully dressed in a 'rain coat' so he did leak which is why its rape and not consensual sex. Had he worn a 'rain coat', then there wouldn't be an issue because they had consented to protected sex.

            Of course had he instead kept to Rosie and her 5 sisters, none of this would have happened and he would already be in US custody if they wanted him.

      3. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "USGov is perfectly happy to let someone accused of leaking so many secrets wander around scot-free"

        Where is he doing this wandering around of which you write?

      4. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Obama, Obama, Obama.

        Why is everyone talking about "the US Government" here when really it is up to Obama as to what happens to AssangeTM? Especially with something of this high visibility? How many executive orders has Obama issued against Assange and Snowden?

        Everyone is treating the U.S. like they are some sort of mysterious bogyman, when really the U.S.'s play is entirely up to Obama and no one else.

      5. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge

        @AC ... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        You're getting down voted because you're focusing on the wrong thing.

        Assange may have tweaked the eagle's beak, but publishing the leaks is the least of his worries and he actually does have strong protection here and could very well fight that thanks to Ellsberg.

        The truth is that if Assange isn't paranoid, then there is some merit to the claim he assisted Manning, which is an illegal act.

    3. Jason Bloomberg Silver badge
      Black Helicopters

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      There may not be any US extradition request at present, America may be suggesting they have no intention of ever making one, but that could change pretty quickly once he's held in a country which could well honour such a request.

      I think he's quite right not to trust the US. We had a government minister embarrassingly having to apologise for Misleading the House after they had been lied to by America, and there are plenty of other cases which show the US cannot be trusted to say what she means or means what she says.

      I recall Assange offered to return to Sweden providing they would make a binding promise not to extradite him to the US but they were not prepared to make such an undertaking.

      Getting out of the embassy without being grabbed by British authorities will be difficult enough, putting him at risk of being deported to the US from the UK.

      Nothing has convinced me that either Sweden or the UK would prevent his extradition to America if that were sought.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        There may not be any US extradition request at present, America may be suggesting they have no intention of ever making one, but that could change pretty quickly once he's held in a country which could well honour such a request.

        Yes, sure. He may also get struck by lightning or die of vitamin D deficiency whilst holed up, so clearly we must assume that will happen too as that is just as likely.

        Why exactly do you think he encouraged people such as Manning? He soon realised that hacking himself would risk his precious unwashed hide, whereas encouraging others with (ultimately empty) promises would provide a happy layer of isolation for himself, again a reason why his "fear of the US' is just a load of self-aggrandising bullshit. I didn't buy that from the moment he brought that idiocy into the world, but the deluded herd of "fans" lapped it up as if it was gospel.

        No wonder the planet is going to shit - critical thinking seems to have all but vanished.

      2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "that could change pretty quickly once he's held in a country which could well honour such a request."

        He was held in a country which could well honour such a request. The UK. Where was the arrest warrant?

      3. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge

        @Jason B.... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        Assange was asking for blanket immunity because there are no extradition requests in play.

        No Government would do that. Period.

        Again the US wouldn't extradite from Sweden because now the UK would be involved.

        If anything the only thing Assange could be in trouble with is the involvement w Manning in the theft of the material. There the statute of limitations is long. Much longer than Sweden's sex crimes and most likely longer than the patience of Ecuador.

        The issue is this.

        He surrenders from the Embassy... he goes to Sweden.

        Best case for Assange, too much time has elapsed and he gets a plea deal w no jail time... or found not guilty if it goes to trial. Worst case... he is found guilty and because of his stunt they throw the book at him and he gets what? 4 years max?

        The from Sweden, he goes back to the UK.

        I don't know what he would get for jumping bail, lets say 2 yrs max?

        From there, he's booted back to Australia. He doesn't get the option to choose where he goes when he leaves England.

        That's where he will be extradited from if the US does in fact extradite him. (A Clinton Presidency would. Trump may not.)

        The US wouldn't attempt to extradite from the EU. They have a better case in Australia due to his prior bad acts as a teen.

      4. Mark 85 Silver badge

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        Nothing has convinced me that either Sweden or the UK would prevent his extradition to America if that were sought.

        This is beginning to sound like a "we don't want him, you take him and he'll be your problem" type of thing.

        I do note the tweet that he'd basically switch places with Manning. I'm guessing that life in prison might be better in his mind than in his current residence? Not being smarmy... but wondering what is behind that tweet.

        1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge
          Boffin

          @Mark 85 ...Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

          "This is beginning to sound like a "we don't want him, you take him and he'll be your problem" type of thing."

          While Assange is a pratt, there is the issue of law and the fact that while Assange could theoretically face the death penalty, they will not agree to any extradition to the US unless its off the table. Since there is no extradition on the table, the worst case for Assange is if he's being indicted as a co-conspirator to Manning. If so, he wouldn't face the death penalty but something less than Manning.

          But even still, Assange would have the ability to fight extradition to the US in both Sweden and the UK since he would be in Swedish Custody and due back to the UK for bail jumping. The UK could waive its right and then if Sweden lets him go... that's it. However that would be a riskier move than just waiting until he's sent back to Australia.

          You have to remember as a teen he was convicted of hacking US government and defense systems. This will play against him if the US wanted Assange. Here they could use his past against him. Australia could also remove his right to travel and take away his passport for his antics in Sweden and the UK. (This would be the Australian Government's right. )

          So while the UK and Sweden really don't want him... (who does?) ... they still have to follow their laws and give him the opportunity to fight the extradition. Now having said all of this... if you want to consider how the US would act... look at how they handled Guccifer. He was in, testified / cut a deal, got sentenced and then back to fulfill his current sentence. Afterwards he could come back to the US, face his sentence and then get sent packing back home. (I think that there are other options ...)

          The bottom line, his fear of the US extraditing him from Europe is in my opinion overblown. Its far easier and more likely that if the US wants him, he'll be taken when he gets back to Australia. A lot depends of course on the winds of politics and world current events.

      5. Windrose

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "... they were not prepared to make such an undertaking."

        This IS true. The Swedish government actually, honestly and opened REFUSED ... to break Swedish law to benefit St. Julian.

        Only a Swedish court can legally refuse an extradiction request and only AFTER it was actually MADE. What'cha know. Them fiendish swedes comply with their own laws! Terrible.

      6. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "but that could change pretty quickly once he's held in a country which could well honour such a request."

        You mean like the UK? Wait...what?

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      The only thing (well, one of the only things) which has remained constant -at least as far as I can see - in this entire sorry saga, is the lack of any concrete steps by the US to show even the slightest bit or interest in Assange.

      Shhhhhh! Don't spoil the myth or we'll be buried under the usual nutjobs trying to re-establish that firmly broken premise. You and I (and may others) know that he's wanted for pretty basic stuff, but Assange needs that "I am wanted by the US" myth to distract from that. After all, he's "special".

      If that meant ""especially obnoxious" I would agree, but he's nothing more than a boring, slightly rapey guy who is trying to avoid a chat with the authorities over activities where Wiki"leaks": means something completely different. The only special bit is that het gets to hide in an embassy while other dodgy people get either collared immediately or become politicians.

      By the way, he tried to get Assange™, not ©, but sensibly neither apply :).

    5. Aitor 1 Silver badge

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      Sorry, but no.

      You are trying to convince me that a person of interest for a rape warrants secre fake basestations, hacking embarry phones and emails, 24/7 surveillance, and inspecting planes with diplomats in different countries.

      No way.

      1. Vincent Ballard

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        @Aitor1, inspecting planes? Are you sure you're not confusing Assange with Snowden?

      2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "and inspecting planes with diplomats in different countries."

        That was Snowdon they were looking for. Maybe Assanges white hair makes it easy to confuse the two men?

    6. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      The suspicion has been the Swedish charges are something that looks strong enough for a trial. The idea is to destroy his credibility by using a very public trial where the actual conviction is irrelevant. While the US hates him, so do others because Wikileaks has been a pain in their sides and embarrassing them on a regular basis.

      1. Phil Koenig

        Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        Actually the Swedish allegations have always been weak and questionable, and the Swedes already had a chance to question him about the allegations, which they did, and they cleared him to leave the country.

        Sorry but for those who have actually reviewed the actual history in detail and who don't have some kind of in-built bias against the guy, the whole matter stinks to high heaven.

        1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge

          @Ohil Koenig. .. Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

          Look, you really need to learn something about the case and Swedish law.

          Assange goes to Sweden to be questioned and charged. Its a formal process. This would have occurred except that Assange's original lawyer in Sweden ran interference while Assange left the country. He admitted to this under oath in the UK during the first extradition appeal.

          Sorry, but for someone claiming to know something... the only thing stinking in this is Assange. You can easily google and read the transcripts which I believe are still online where the case against him was spelled out.

          Assange had not one but three extradition appeal hearings and each one said he was to go back.

          The law works. Assange had his day in court. Now the women he allegedly raped should have theirs to get some closure.

    7. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      " the lack of any concrete steps by the US to show even the slightest bit or interest in Assange"

      That's what's really bugging him: being treated as unimportant.

    8. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge
      Boffin

      @Jimmy Page... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      I think to answer your question you have this:

      "

      If Obama grants Manning clemency, Assange will agree to US prison in exchange -- despite its clear unlawfulness https://t.co/MZU30S3Eia

      "

      Why is Assange making this statement?

      The answer is that while there are no charges pending or extradition request, Assange is fearful of the US.

      Its not for publishing the Wikileaks documents. He actually has some legal protections under the claims that he is a journalistic organization. the "Ellsberg" SCOTUS decision back in '71 allows Wikileaks and Assange to claim that they published for the greater good. Any decent lawyer would be able to win that case.

      But the larger issue... Assange may have also participated in the break in and subsequent theft which would carry a heavy prison sentence. We know of this because of evidence revealed in Manning's Article 32 hearing, and if true then Assange is an accomplice. Yet this was never produced during his court martial because Manning had admitted to the facts of the theft. Nor did Manning make any public statements concerning Assange. Assange's fear of the US tends to lend credibility to the claim that he helped Manning break in....

      The whole mess in Sweden is Assange's own doing. Boys will be boys and that's what he gets for taking women for granted. (When in Sweden, play by their rules...) So the whole issue there is that these women should get their day in court, something Assange has deprived them from having...

      The point is that the fear of extradition from the UK or Sweden is over rated. If he did go to Sweden, and he did get found guilty, and he did get prison time... He could be extradited to face a trial in the US, however that scenario would be unlikely. The issue would have to go through both the UK and Sweden. Then there's the issue of bail jumping. Jail time for that. Again the US could extradite him, but he could again fight it and who knows.

      After all of this... he goes back to Australia.

      And here... he yet again could be extradited to the US. Here, however, unlike in the EU/UK, Assange was convicted as a teen for breaking in to US Systems. This could come in to play and would make the extradition much easier.

      So if Assange did assist in the theft. He does have reason to fear the US, except that he will not be rendered in the EU or UK, but in Australia. (I know Brexit won't happen for a while but just getting used to the idea...)

    9. PNGuinn
      Headmaster

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      It's Assange (TM) not Assange (c), is it not?

      I'm bored.

    10. Hans 1 Silver badge

      Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

      >I know there's a lot of paranoia about the US, but they are not going to risk the cosy UK-US extradition agreement (which would be in tatters if they snatched Assange (c) from Sweden) for the likes of Assange (c) who - willingly if not arbitrarily - is slipping into the back pages of the 2000s, and only has himself to blame.

      Jimmy, listen, I think you live in the past.

      1. UK is no longer a world power

      2. cf 1.

      3. cf 1.

      4. The US-UK extradition agreement is one way only: FROM UK to US

      5. cf 1.

      6. The UK has absolutely NO SAY whatsoever in what Sweden does once Assange is in Sweden.

      7. cf 1.

      8. Neither the US, nor Sweden care what UK thinks in this matter. The US knows UK will accept any decision taken by the US in this matter, just like any other, as they have ALWAYS done since at least 1941 ... if not 1920.

      9. You guessed it, cf 1.

      1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge

        @Hans1 ... Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

        "6. The UK has absolutely NO SAY whatsoever in what Sweden does once Assange is in Sweden."

        Uhm this is wrong. Flat out wrong.

        Because of the EAW and extradition proceedings, if any country made an extradition request to Sweden, the UK would have some input on the request. Depending on the situation, they could object.

        This had been pointed out during the first extradition hearing where Assange put forth the insane idea that this was a plot by the CIA to get him.

        Again the truth... when this all blows over, if the US wanted him in connection to Manning's theft, they will have plenty of time to get him in Australia, assuming he doesn't flee.

        Remember his prior bad acts as a teen will be brought up and used against him in Australia which would pretty much seal the deal. Maybe he wouldn't have ended up such a pratt if that judge had sentenced him to jail instead of probation.

  3. Natalie Gritpants

    If he is ever dissapeared

    no one will care, just assume it's yet more publicity seeking

    1. DropBear Silver badge
      FAIL

      Re: If he is ever dissapeared

      Factually incorrect. Although I can't vouch for how many others might share my interest.

    2. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge

      Re: If he is ever dissapeared

      People would care and many would be happy.

      Seriously... if the US wanted him. He will be extradited in Australia and it would be very public.

      You also have to ask yourself why the US is paying for Chelsea Manning's Sex change operation... ;-)

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Assange, a man who could have been a hero.

    reality check: Look at me! Look at ME!!!!!

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    'Evading justice'

    I guess it all depends on who's version of justice they speak of.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: 'Evading justice'

      "I guess it all depends on who's version of justice they speak of"

      well, he could start with the Swedish version .... unless he thinks a public trial will make him look bad, discolour is self-installed halo or something ...

  6. Lee D Silver badge

    "If Obama grants Manning clemency, Assange will agree to US prison in exchange -- despite its clear unlawfulness"

    Sorry, but suspected offenders do not get to give conditions on their arrest.

    And an arrest isn't a charge.

    And a charge isn't guilt.

    And guilt (or not) doesn't mean the US will try to snipe you from the opposite building. I mean, they're thick, but not THAT thick, and that's if they even DO care enough to be bothered (which I doubt).

    It's really quite simple. You have two choices:

    Live in the embassy forever and hope you never annoy the ambassador - or any of his replacements - enough that they just ask the police to come in and eject you (because they can do that)

    Come outside and be arrested at some point, and face trial at some point, and do whatever time is assigned by a court (if applicable) at some point, and then lose the media circus forever when nothing happens after that.

    Any other option (escape, appeals, negotiations, etc.) will inevitably end in one of the above anyway.

    I hope the embassy has Netflix and Amazon deliveries. Because for sure the UK prison for skipping bail won't even if the Swedes decide they don't care any more.

  7. IsJustabloke Silver badge
    Joke

    None of you are asking the important question!

    Will there be a follow up to the last movie that details his adventures in the Ecuadorian Embassy?!?!

    1. Marketing Hack Silver badge
      Go

      Re: None of you are asking the important question!

      Thursday, June 23, 2016:

      Not F'in chicken empenadas again!!

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019