back to article Julian AssangeTM to meet investigators in London

Couch-surfing sex crimes suspect Julian Assange will soon meet with Swedish authorities. In case you came in late, Assange has spent most of the last four years in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. He's there because Sweden wants a word over an investigation into possible sex crimes, but Assange fears if he sets foot in Sweden …

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Gimp

While this is going on...

Assange Strongly Implies DNC Staffer Was Murdered for Being Wikileaks Source

It's like we are in the deepest thicket of Bush Junior's second campaign again.

Now with added spice of "War with Russia Possible Any Minute Now, so vote Hillary". Great stuff, I have ordered a bunker full of popcorn.

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Yeah, but the reality show named Assange is like all the others - I just can't be arsed.

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Re: While this is going on...

Snowden demonstrated why you can't be too paranoid.

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Re: While this is going on...

If he really believes Clinton had a DNC staffer murdered, why would he want to leave the embassy? That's probably about the safest place for him, even if the Swedish charges are dismissed and he's free to go wherever he wants he craves publicity too much to stay in hiding.

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Coat

"Yeah, but the reality show named Assange is like all the others - I just can't be arsed."

I thought he died years ago and the show got cancelled.

I'll take Assanges Coat, 'cos he don't need one if he's not going outside.

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Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

How to rub salt into his sofa-sores.

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Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

The real salt will be when sweden say 'no further charges, off you go'. The he gets arrested by the UK for dodging court and bail thus gets extradited by the UK to the US.

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Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

No, the real salt will be when Sweden says "no further charges, off you go." Then he gets arrested by the UK for dodging court and bail, and the US doesn't request extradition.

(Whether that will be the case or not, I don't know - but it would be priceless if the twat gets ignored.)

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Holmes

Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

No, the real salt will be when Sweden says "no further charges, off you go." Then he gets arrested by the UK for dodging court and bail, and the US doesn't request extradition.

True. Assange's greatest nightmare would be if he is free on the streets and he finds that Obama doesn't want him. Although at this point I think Barry would rather leave Assange™ to whomever succeeds him.

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Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

Well, given that the US never asked the UK for extradition in the time he was wandering the streets here after the leaks you have to wonder why it's more likely they would ask the UK, or indeed Sweden, for extradition now.

Maybe it's all been about avoiding the rapey charges all along?

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Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

>Although at this point I think Barry would rather leave Assange™ to whomever succeeds him.

A characteristically English view of our legal and government systems. Unfortunately the US runs a political/legal system which could be roughly characterized as 'organized anarchy'. The various bits sometimes cooperate, sometimes compete, but the one thing they don't do is act in a unified manner driven by dictates from the top.

...and there lies the danger. He's going to be seen as a handy way of furthering someone's career. So he's toast if he goes near the US. Truth? Justice? Mere details....

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

He has not been charged with anything.

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Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

"The he gets arrested by the UK for dodging court and bail thus gets extradited by the UK to the US."

You mean gets extradited just like he didn't when he was on bail?

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Re: Ministerio de Movilidad Humana

Doubtful that Obama is interested. If Sweden does want him, then his only hope is to ensure that Clinton will want to extradite in the hope that Ecuador will take pity, rather than showing him the door. Thus the nastiness toward Clinton? Hmm. I love the irony of that, though, seeing as Clinton has probably already leaked far more than Assange could ever hope to.

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Anonymous Coward

Ugh...

So, after 4 years of a swedish bureaucrat waving their dick or vagina about insisting that they couldn't possible interview Assange outside of Sweden (due to the aforementioned "unclear reasons).. they are now going to interview assange outside of Sweden.

I look forward to 10 years from now when I can watch the documentary and finally find out what the heck went on with this whole thing.

Anyone else more clued up than me (about the assange thing I mean.. ;)) ?

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Re: Ugh...

"So, after 4 years of a swedish bureaucrat waving their dick

[...] I look forward to 10 years from now when I can watch the documentary and finally find out what the heck went on with this whole thing.[...]

Assange fled from their jurisdiction (which he should have been interviewed per Swedish procedure, if you read below), after his legal counsel had been advised the police wanted to interview him prior to charging him. Though his legal counsel denied having been in contact with him, he subsequently admitted this was not true in a British court, which led his professional association to declare they wished to interview him, the implication being that he must have tipped his client the wink, which wink precipitated his client's flight from Swedish justice. Later, back in the UK, Assange broke bail (put up by his 'friends'), and fled again, this time to the representative of the human rights abusing Ecuadorian government, where he's been for four years.

Inconsistencies have plagued Assange's arguments from the very start, and here we are; Assange claimed it was inhumane to put him in Wandsworth prison, and applied for bail, the British CJS, as if blissfully unaware that he was by definition at risk of absconding (because he did so from Sweden when facing the probability of arrest under the normal Swedish procedure of 1) interview then 2) charge and 3) arrest), gave him bail. As I say, Assange gratefully and inexplicably again vanished in a puff of smoking packets, and reappeared in the Ecuadorian embassy. I note ironically this must have been the biggest ftp operation since the equally second rate Lawnmower man.

In past times Assange indicated he wanted to settle in Sweden, apparently because it was liberal and actually housed a Wikileaks server. After he'd been advised of his status as a suspect in that fair country he declared it has banana republic standards of justice, whilst indicating he felt they'd extradite him to the US, mentioning capital punishment as a source of concern; it is the case that Sweden does not extradite to countries intending to apply capital punishment; so, having fled to the country most likely by virtue of a Tony Blair/US treaty to bend over for the US government and extradite him, then being subjected to a EAW (which means he cannot be extradited until the EAW is spent), he claimed he was at risk of extradition to the US from Sweden.

My opinion? Although it is an opinion I'll save the Reg any agony by expressing it, but you can surely tell what it is, owing to the way the facts stack up and my expressions of disbelief.

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Re: Ugh...

Ten years from now you'll be able to watch your pick of documentaries, and come out with whichever preconceived story the producers wanted you to.

If you really want to know "what the heck went on", you'll have to pay much, much closer attention than that. I'm not sure it's even possible at this point, short of applying to work at the Ecuadorian Embassy: there are so many shills and trolls on both sides who both have plenty of mud to throw up, to defame Assange on one side or muddy the issue on the other.

Neither side is making even the most cursory attempt to pretend to be fair or honest, and I don't see that changing in my lifetime.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Ugh...

Sweden allows US "rendition" - a real possibility during the height of the "hang him high for treason" proclamations by some of the less intelligent US congresspeople.

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FAIL

Re: Ugh...

Most of the US's allies have been complicit in rendition including the UK so your point is?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Ugh...

Assange's concern (clearly grounded) was that rendition was likely, extradition is what most of the MSM and the anti-Assange crowd focused upon. The rhetoric from the US was running pretty hot at the time if you are able to recall.

https://www.hrw.org/news/2006/11/09/sweden-violated-torture-ban-cia-rendition

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Ugh...

He didn't flee. He was questioned while still in Sweden and they told him that "we have nothing on you, please go". And he did. Then the prosecutor decided to open the case again, against the will of the alleged rape victim, it should be noted (who recognise Assange as her then-boyfriend and not a rapist), and that's when the whole circus started.

It doesn't take half a brain to suspect that Sweden is up to no good and that the prosecutor's alleged reason is just an excuse.

Although Sweden is officially a neutral country, it has a long history of helping anybody who asks behind the scenes in order to maintain their neutral reputation.

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Re: Ugh...

@Scorchio!!

You missed the additional gem: that his self-imposed exile in the embassy is a further breach of his human rights by being unlawful imprisonment or some such argument whose logic I fail to follow.

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"the Government of Ecuador has offered cooperation to effectuate the interrogation of Julian Assange on the premises of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, among other legal and political order to reach a satisfactory solution for all parties to end to unnecessary delays in the process and ensure effective judicial protection. "

Translation of translation:

We are sick of this shit. We're gonna sit down and have a natter to see if we can sort next steps.

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Trollface

It will be interesting to see whether the UK government let him off his bail jumping - I suspect not. If they do, what is the betting that those mugs who put up the money will be waiting in the nearest dark alley?

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He jumped bail

Unless the UK government can deport him to Ecuador without it being a media circus then Assange is stuck in the embassy to rot.

Assange can only blame himself for his own stupidity.

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Trollface

"what is the betting that those mugs who put up the money will be waiting in the nearest dark alley?"

Shorely shome mistake? Special Snowflakes don't jump people in dark alleys, do they?

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Re: He jumped bail

I betcha Assange has a whole list of other folks to blame for his woes.

Sure he only has himself to blame - unless he gets creative!

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Stop

Actually lets be clear here...

The reason Sweden never interrogated him before was that they were not legally (under Swedish law) ALLOWED to! Apparently that law has been changed so now they can.

Not that it makes any difference, he still wont be able to come out of the Ecuador embassy anytime soon, he's still wanted for jumping bail in the UK...

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Re: Actually lets be clear here...

Got a link to that law? Swedish DAs had interviewed suspects both abroad and over the phone before Assange ever set foot in Sweden.

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Boffin

Re: Actually lets be clear here...

@pffut :

Did you RTFA?

"the proposed Ecuador to Sweden negotiating an Agreement on Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters, which was signed last December and provides the legal framework for the practice of judicial proceedings required."

Ecuador has stated that no Agreement on Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters existed until last December. Further, Ecuador has stated that without said agreement, there was no legal framework for the "proceedings required" - that is, the questioning of Assange by Swedish DA's while Assange is on the sovereign territory of Ecuador.

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i know but...

ok, so i know we're not out of europe yet... but

and its likely to be one of the negotiating points...

and .. it probably would not be retrospectively applied but...

does leaving europe take away the "european arrest warrant" that was what started this.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: i know but...

does leaving europe take away the "european arrest warrant" that was what started this.

Unlikely, but you do raise an interesting point - the UK will also have to agree a new cross judicial collaboration framework with both the EU and the nations the EU has previously negotiated with.

The fun part is that the UK could soon be closer to China than any of the EU states once it exits, which creates all sort of interesting problems as it then also suffers less control from EU Human Rights laws. This May get ugly (pun intended).

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Re: i know but...

From a quick google, the EAW is a framework and therefore only comes into force when each member state enacts it into domestic law.

So since it's already in domestic law, in or out of the EU makes no difference until domestic law is changed, we'll still play the same rules with the other counties covered by the domstic law (which may be labelled as "EU members" and not individually named, I haven't checked).

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Re: i know but...

"[...] does leaving europe take away the "european arrest warrant" that was what started this."

No it was not; Assange fled the Swedish jurisdiction when he discovered that he was about to be 1) interviewed, 2) charged and 3) arrested, per Swedish criminal justice procedures; the EAW came after he arrived in this jurisdiction, which is (you are absolutely correct if you think so) still obliged to honour the EAW until after Brexit is complete, which will be some time after article 50 is activated.

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Headmaster

Re: i know but...

You may have missed this, but we're not leaving Europe. We're leaving the European Union (if the politicians actually follow through). They're very different things.

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Re: i know but...

we're not leaving Europe. We're leaving the European Union

It's a pity, actually, I would have loved to see the return of British engineering ingenuity to make the former happen. Not quite sure if the Eurotunnel would survive the move, though.

:-)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: i know but...

Are the British Isles in fact part of Europe?

I mean geologically/geographically. It would seem to me that they are Islands "floating" off the coat of Europe and thus not part of it.

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Re: i know but...

Are the British Isles in fact part of Europe?

I mean geologically/geographically. It would seem to me that they are Islands "floating" off the coat of Europe and thus not part of it.

Just like Sicily, eh?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: i know but...

"we're not leaving Europe. We're leaving the European Union"

LOL - you actually believe that?!?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: i know but...

The Azores?

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Re: i know but...

The UK archipelago is part of the European continental plate, so yes, geologically speaking, and by geographical convention, the UK is part of Europe.

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Re: i know but...

Set up the Spindizzies (c James Blish) and we could actually move the UK or non-EU parts somewhere else - I recommend the West Indies - I can only dream...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: i know but...

Because those are our British values.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: i know but...

Nope, Sweden didn't want him while he was in Sweden. They had already interviewed him. He was free to leave.

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Re: i know but...

The British isles are firmly attached to the European continental shelf and used to be connected to France by land.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: i know but...

Nope, Sweden didn't want him while he was in Sweden. They had already interviewed him. He was free to leave.

Sure, and he was so confident in his actions that he ran away the moment his lawyer warned him they wanted to have another chat...

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Re: i know but...

EU does not have human rights laws, that's separate and nothing to do with the EU, other than being a member of the EU pretty much(*) requires you to be a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights and thus subject to the rulings of the European Court of Human Rights which has nothing to do with the EU and it's court aka the European Court of Justice. Yet another thing that many of those voting for Brexit failed utterly to understand.

* The actual requirement is to have legislation protecting human rights. So far every state has achieved this requirement of EU membership by being a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights. In theory you could do it some other way by strong enough national legislation and an sufficiently independent judiciary for example.

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Anonymous Coward

"Assange has long argued that Swedish police should just hop on a plane, endure the horrors of Heathrow and drop in for a congenial chat over a cup of tea. The reasons why that hasn't happened are unclear. "

The reasons should be crystal clear - the suspect in a criminal case should not be allowed to decide where and when questions can be asked. Not to mention the teeny tiny point that Swedish law didn't allow for it - nor should it ..

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The Bridge/Broen/Bron

I seem to remember in The Bridge that the Danish and Swedish cops were forever popping between the two countries, so presumably Swedish cops are allowed out of the country sometimes.

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Anonymous Coward

He's on Ecuadorian Soil...

Assange is not in the EU or the UK, he's on Ecuadorian Soil, granted Policital Asylum, by the Ecuador Government, who are making a point to stand up to, what they see as Americian Aggression, in this case, a potential abuse of Human rights.

Assange has well-founded fear of persecution if he were to be extradited to Sweden. It's not him deciding when and where questions can be asked, its between Swedish Prosecution and Ecuador. Its often the case someone who causes the establishment trouble, is set up for a minor offence, so they are then curtailed from further activity, by dragging them through the courts which by all intent, has worked in this case for 5 years, if that is indeed what has happened. That sort of activity was rife during the cold war years.

No one has come off well in this, least of which the UK Government. The original offence (if there ever was one) has long been served, by his self imprisonment.

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