back to article BBC will ‘retain your viewing history’

Last week the BBC launched a mobile app, called BBC+, delivering “customisable content collections” to your phone or tablet. It’s a personalised service which requires an email address. Last year, when the corporation announced its plans for personalised services, it made several data protection promises. Specifically, Phil …

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English translation needed

"We have met and continue to engage with the ICO on personal data usage. We regularly review the ICO’s published guidance about current and future legislation, particularly in relation to GDPR. We comply with all aspects of the Data Protection Act and take the operational privacy and security of people’s personal information very seriously."

I recognise all the words but have a problem extracting meaning. I do, however, recognise the last bit. It occurs frequently in association with "only a few customers were affected" or similar expressions.

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Re: English translation needed

I do, however, recognise the last bit.

The first bit (We have met and continue to engage with the ICO on personal data usage etc) sounds to me as if they are looking for loopholes. Why would you need to meet/engage with the ICO other than to see if some wheeze is allowed?

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Re: English translation needed

I recognise all the words but have a problem extracting meaning.

That's probably because there isn't one, or they don't want anyone to be able to figure out the meaning.

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Re: English translation needed

I recognise all the words but have a problem extracting meaning.

Try this... "We have lots of meetings. The morning pastries are excellent and the lunch and beer are perfect. We also get write all this off our taxes and have a few manager types not on the premises so the worker bees get a few more things done."

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Re: English translation needed

As an outsider who's had meetings at the BBC, I can confirm there is tea and coffee but there are no free pastries and few boozy lunches, mainly because of miserly funts who think that working for any publicly-funded body should be a monastic slog. There might be a subsidised cafe and bar, which is entirely reasonable. The exception is for visiting journalists, politicians and celebs, who are showered with food and booze as they are everywhere, and probably think this applies to everyone else.

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Stop

It's for marketing...

As Fearnley says, the BBC is not trying to sell you anything

Well, either he's lying through his teeth, or http://store.bbc.com/ is about to be closed down.

I wonder which it is?

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Re: It's for marketing...

Certainly if you are not using UK IP address they sell stuff and give you 3rd party adverts.

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Re: It's for marketing...

You also have to consider that while -they- aren't trying to sell you something, they have advertisers that pay a pretty penny to get their hands on it (in fact, television stations were among the first to get on the "sell our customers' data to advertisers" business model). TV viewing habits are quite valuable to advertisers, especially when they can be combined with the mountains of data they are gathering from all their other sources.

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Re: It's for marketing...

This is the BBC, they don't have adverts, or advertisers. They are not allowed to as they are publicly funded.

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(Written by Reg staff)

Re: Re: It's for marketing...

BBC World does. Certain websites of theirs also display ads when viewed from abroad.

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Re: It's for marketing...

You're confusing the BBC with BBC Worldwide.

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@Andrew

Could you ask the BBC specifically whether it has carried out a Privacy Impact Assessment [PDF]?

If they have, could they share it with us, please? And if they haven't, pray why not?

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Anonymous Coward

and six months down the line...

The offer of loadsamoney from a Large Ad slinger will make the BBC change their pledge and bang all that lovely data has gone to the Ad men. Once they finish drooling over it, you will get bombarded with Ad for things that you never knew existed let alone wanted just because some relationship was match to a word in a page you once viewed for 5 nano seconds.

nope. sorry BBC not going to bite.

Posting Anon for ... well you know why.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Posting Anon for ... well you know why.

I do. Posting stupid? Post anonymous.

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Re: Posting Anon for ... well you know why.

Not that stupid, since the BBC are ready sharing browsing history with the Ads market:

http://www.krux.com/customer-success/case-studies/bbc-worldwide-case-study/

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Re: and six months down the line...

Down votes for marketing cynism? Far too many naive people in this world.

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Opera use to have a similar pledge about the data they gathered on users of its browser. We're going to find out that that's worth now that it's been bought over. (I know the BBC is not 'commercial' entity but that didn't stop Call Me Dave selling extremely sensitive personal information held by the NHS for a tiny fraction of it's value and there's plenty of MPs who would like to see it privatised or made to pay it's way more (both the BBC and the NHS)).

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Happily there are disposable e-mail addresses and Mailinator.

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Is it any worse than what Netflix or Amazon (presumably) do with your data?

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"Is it any worse than what Netflix or Amazon (presumably) do with your data?"

From the Beeb we should be able to expect better. Much better.

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Headmaster

Retarded Argument

Please will you stop using the childish excuse that X is fine because Y and Z are worse. What point are you trying to make?

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Re: Retarded Argument

My point is why attack X when Y and Z have been doing it for ages? Attack them first.

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"From the Beeb we should be able to expect better. Much better"

Better how? Isn't this boilerplate stuff, several years old, and doesn't the BBC have to buy audience research in regardless?

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Well for a start Netflix and Amazon have never sent me threatening letters with the possibility of imprisonment behind them for not wanting to use their service...

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Re: Retarded Argument

"My point is why attack X when Y and Z have been doing it for ages? Attack them first."

Prevention is better than cure.

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Big Brother

Hmmm. The BBC have sent me threatening letters with the possibility of imprisonment behind them for not wanting to use their service.

I once owned a TV, via which I viewed DVDs and digital video from my Mac and cable TV from Virgin. As a TV owner the BBC demanded that I must be compelled to pay a punitive tax, for not wanting to use their service. I refused, the BBC didn't think this was acceptable, and and the threatening began.

Think about it.

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I don't have a TV licence, and I've never had a problem.

But then, unlike your example ("cable TV from Virgin") I don't have a system that receives broadcast TV, the only access I would have to BBC is via iplayer, and I haven't used that since canceling my tv licence either.

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re: and cable TV from Virgin

That counts as broadcast TV, you need a license for that. Should've stuck to the DVDs and iPlayer (not live streaming) and you'd be legally fine.

Ignorance of the law and all that.....

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haven't had a problem?

Wow you are lucky. I don't have a TV anymore, nor devices for watching. I get a letter every other week (which I save and deliver to my MP). I get a visit around once a month (which I refuse to let in my house). Eventually they will get tired of the game and turn up with some court order I expect.

This is intimidation. If I were a little old pensioner instead of being a bloody minded miserable grumpy old man then I might be scared into all sorts.

In the UK we are supposed (and I know it is now very clearly no longer the case) we are supposed to be innocent until proven guilty. It is up 'to them' to build a case and prove you are guilty of an offence, it is NOT up to you to prove yourself innocent.

I expect we will soon see the day when MPs back down and allow the BBC to charge us all regardless of whether we have any means of viewing tv. They will argue that the bbc provides online stuff for everyone and therefore is allowed the money. This will lead to situations like the one in Germany where a guy with no power never mind tv in a shack in a forest clearing has to have a licence.

Frankly I would prefer the MPs dismantle the bbc and let it go to a warm place in a handcart

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Arrgh Beeb

And the other doozy coming from Auntie Beeb is you'll need a TV licence for Iplayer from 1st September 2016.

Amazing how they can retain your data on the one hand, and on the other are incapable of tying a username/password to your TV licence account.

More info:

http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one/topics/bbc-iplayer-and-the-tv-licence

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

I notice from that link that in the FAQ "What do I do if I have a license? Your address will be automatically approved...."

they'll tie it to your IP address apparently....the cynic in me says to start scanning downloads for embedded watermarks...

P.

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

How will they tie your IP address to your physical address?

I think they mean your household will be covered and won't get an inspector coming round.

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

"What do I do if I have a license? Your address will be automatically approved...."

Think that's the physical house address, not IP address... .

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

IP address?

And the chances of me always accessing iplayer from same IP address will be zero.

.

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

Expect a raft of BBC programs to appear on torrent sites, usage in "getIplayer" will increase, and the BBC will be asking ISPs for users IP details to see if any of them ARE connecting to the BBC.

Cat and mouse again.

I'll stick with my black and white license.

PS, as i do not need a license to pick up radio, will the iplayer radio site be covered in this little facade as well???

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

PS, as i do not need a license to pick up radio, will the iplayer radio site be covered in this little facade as well???

You could have found the answer to that by looking at the site linked-to:

"There will be just two exceptions – watching S4C TV on demand and listening to radio. "

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

"And the other doozy coming from Auntie Beeb is you'll need a TV licence for Iplayer from 1st September 2016.

Amazing how they can retain your data on the one hand, and on the other are incapable of tying a username/password to your TV licence account."

The suggestion is that you will need to use your TV licence details to access iPlayer so yes, they will know everything about you.

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Re: Arrgh Beeb @ Phil O'Sophical

It doesn't mention radio and im not sifting through the beebs propaganda to find out.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Arrgh Beeb

It wouldn't surprise me if iPlayer decides to block VPN ranges.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Arrgh Beeb @ Phil O'Sophical

The modifications to the communications act due for September may be found http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/704/pdfs/uksi_20160704_en.pdf

I've yet to work out for certain if "on-demand programme provided by BBC" includes archived music or not, there could still be scope for this to happen.

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Re: Arrgh Beeb

So now when the police and jackbooted licence inspectors visit then they will check not just for TVs but now have an excuse to take every computer, fondle pad, smart phone etc, in the house away for forensic examination... probably for months...

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There's been a rampant history in the BBC

Of fiddling and diddling and I wouldn't trust them with my pole. Barge pole is optional....!

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Facepalm

How intrusive!

Step 1: Create new account using disposable email address.

Step 2: Enjoy.

Re: Licence required for watching iPlayer. Damn! Now I'll have to watch Click at my mum's house.

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Re: How intrusive!

Click is broadcast on World Service. AFAIK, you don't need a license for that coz the UK Gov pays for most of it out of the Foreign Office budget (or some other namelss dept).

Youcan get it outside of the UK no problem so why not inside?

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Re: How intrusive!

The World Service used to be government funded but now, thanks to our wise and noble leaders, it's paid for from the licence fee, limited advertising and profits from BBC Worldwide Ltd.(So says Wiki.)

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Re: How intrusive!

Click (the video program) was first an iPlayer exclusive, then went on to be hidden away on BBC news (where nobody knew it was on). Click is like a modern Tomorrow's world but rather than make it available to the masses (BBC1 or BBC2) they hide it away thereby wasting tax payer's money. They send a full staff and crew on jollies all around globe. If the BBC had to earn a living they would make sure this program was publicized and as many people watched as possible. But because of the unique way they are funded (extortion) it doesn't affect the bottomless pit. So the presenters become rich on your dime with next to zero viewers.

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Re: How intrusive!

@King Jack

It used to be shown on BBC1 on, I think, Monday morning. I didn't realise it had been removed as I watch it on iPlayer.

As for the presenters being rich: Spencer Kelly is still wearing the military style jacket he bought from C&A.

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Thankfully...

The BBC do not produce anything worth watching anyway, every time I see a BBC channel it's deadenders, antiques shows, house buying/selling or biased news.

There used to be a show called Top Gear that was fairly good, but even that's been messed up now.

So thankfully I'll not be using this service, even more so now they will be retaining and selling your viewing records (They claim they don't, but they will eventually even if in secret, after all.. why collect it if you don't plan to use it?)

I would suggest to everyone: Ditch your TV License, totally block any and all BBC channels on your TV, block BBC URL's on all your internet accessing kit and just stop paying for the pointless license.

Or better yet, do it my way, take down your aerial antenna/dish, and sell it on eBay, this way there is no TV signals at all coming from your property, then just hook up a computer with Kodi/Netflix and download anything you intend to watch instead.

You need to notify them that you do not require a TV license, but they ignore it and still send abusive threatening letters anyway.

But this way, even if they turn up you can just say "I don't need a TV License". Although, in the 5 years or so I've not paid for a TV license I've not had anyone actually turn up yet, lots of wasted paper from them though.

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Re: Thankfully...

"I would suggest to everyone: Ditch your TV License ............ download anything you intend to watch instead."

And when no one makes TV or films because there's no profit to be had, what then?

It wont work. I've ignored all forms of sport for 30 years and yet it's still out there.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Thankfully...

> "The BBC do not produce anything worth watching anyway,"

Attenborough ... ;)

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