back to article '2nd referendum' topples site

The UK government’s parliament.uk website has crashed under the traffic of Remain voters demanding a second referendum. The result of Thursday’s vote defied expectations. Even so, security experts reckon that there are steps that public-facing websites can take in avoiding falling offline in the face of overwhelming demand. …

“Predictive analytics can help identify where an issue might occur before it takes place,”

Pity that wasn't applied to the whole brexit situation !

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FAIL

Traditional EU response

Keep voting until we get the right result!

Lisbon Treaty/Ireland anyone?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Traditional EU response

What keep voting till you get the score you want?

It's called a "Sturgeon" move

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2nd Referendum

Why? Were the electorate too dumb to get it right the first time.

Shit like this happens in a democracy, the time to start trying to persuade voters to your point of view is before the election. This petition should be taken down.

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TRT
Silver badge

Re: 2nd Referendum

No, because when you take a measurement you have to allow for a degree of variance. If you can't you take repeated measurements, you take best of three, or a best of five, or an average. If you've got no measure of the noise in the system, how can you say if a result is significant or not? The same can be said for general elections as well!

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Silver badge

Re: 2nd Referendum

It's a valid argument but the horse has already bolted. It would, sadly, be wrong to backdate something like this. It should have been done before the referendum but then people were worried that Remain might only win by a handful of votes.

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TRT
Silver badge

Re: 2nd Referendum

Indeed. I would far preferred to have seen a three stage process. Do you want to leave the EU? Are you sure? Do you understand the implications of making this change?

"Hi there! It looks like you're trying to send a message. Would you like some help with that?"

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 2nd Referendum

The 'Lisbon Treaty' was foisted upon Ireland twice until they swallowed it. Hope that doesn't happen again... But nothing is fixed, as the referendum isn't actually legally binding....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-32810887 ...

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"Could MPs block an EU exit?

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Could the necessary legislation pass the Commons, given that a lot of MPs - all SNP and Lib Dems, nearly all Labour and many Conservatives - were in favour of staying? The referendum result is not legally binding - Parliament still has to pass the laws that will get Britain out of the 28 nation bloc, starting with the repeal of the 1972 European Communities Act.

The withdrawal agreement also has to be ratified by Parliament - the House of Lords and/or the Commons could vote against ratification, according to a House of Commons library report. In practice, Conservative MPs who voted to remain in the EU would be whipped to vote with the government. Any who defied the whip would have to face the wrath of voters at the next general election.

One scenario that could see the referendum result overturned, is if MPs forced a general election and a party campaigned on a promise to keep Britain in the EU, got elected and then claimed that the election mandate topped the referendum one. Two-thirds of MPs would have to vote for a general election to be held before the next scheduled one in 2020. "

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Silver badge

Re: 2nd Referendum

No, because when you take a measurement you have to allow for a degree of variance

Let's for a second pretend that statistics are the correct viewpoint. What do you think would be the variance on a 72% turnout fior a population of 60+ million? It will actually be less than the margin by which leave won so there is no likelihood of any difference in the result.

This is exactly why the petition is actually asking for changing the rules going for ridiculous turnout threshold (75%) and absolute voter majority. It is a bit too late to change the game rules. The game was played and leave won. Now let's grab a popcorn bag and watch the consequences because winning did not piss off Europe (and especially the Germans) anywhere as much as Cameron saying he will not be bothered to invoke the leave procedure for 60 days and hand that honour to Boris. That blew their gasket outright.

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Silver badge

Re: 2nd Referendum

The withdrawal agreement also has to be ratified by Parliament

There are two ways to leave a club. One is to send a letter of your intent to leave and stop paying your club fees. The other one is to be shown the door.

Why does everyone expect that the European community will just sit and wait while leaving the UK parliament decide everything? That IMHO is an extremely optimistic assumption.

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Bronze badge

Re: 2nd Referendum

Now we need a referendum about whether the UK will remain in the Eurovision Song Contest

If the EU succeeds, then the European football competition will see the UK defeat les blues (the EU team, instead of all these 'sovereign' countries).

You must realise that (unless the UK breaks the, eht EU will have few native English speakers, so in a decade or so, continental kids will learn Polish instead of English in school.

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Silver badge

Re: 2nd Referendum

Frankly, yes.

We can now see that a large section of the electorate voted based on xenophobia and lies.

Even Farage admitted that Leave repeatedly lied through their teeth.

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Re: 2nd Referendum

Unfortunately, Parliament has no control over pressing the button that starts withdrawal from the EU, as opposed to disentangling it from domestic law. That's up to the government.

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Re: 2nd Referendum

Because there is no mechanism for showing somebody the door.

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Re: 2nd Referendum

"Why does everyone expect that the European community will just sit and wait while leaving the UK parliament decide everything? ."

Because (1) there is no mechanism to eject a member and (2) in a delicious piece of irony, were that ability to be introduced it would have to be done as a treaty change for which there would need to be a unanimous vote, which the UK could block (so we could leave when we wanted and not when Johnny Foreigner decided, thank you very much).

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Anonymous Coward

Constitutional amendment needs more than 50:50 vote?

Over a number of years I've worked in a number of democratic (non governmental) organisations.

In each of them, a major change to the organisation's constitution (e.g. to the way it does business) is not possible unless it has a substantial majority of the vote, not some 50:50 or so.

Accepting that the UK effectively has no constitution, why wasn't a vote such as this set up to require a one-third/two-thirds vote split (or whatever number might be appropriate)?

Anybody want to crowdfund a judicial review?

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Not what I hear.

The German response seems to be get out and soon before you bing the whole thing crashing down. France likely to be just as nervous when Marine Le Pen waves the Union Jack and demands France has a referendum too.

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Anonymous Coward

The dumb row votes

I've noticed that all of the lower functioning people of the Facebook groups that I am a member of all jumped up and down for Brexit, whereas the more informed chose to vote remain. Sadly there are more cretins than informed people in the populous who chose to follow lies, fairy stories and pretty graphics rather than listen to learned reason.

I don't think that the education system can be held to blame, as most of the younger generation who stand most to lose from our leaving the EU expressed a desire to stay, and it's these citizens that are going to me most hurt by our navel-gazing decision to throw our toys out of the pram.

Basically we are fucked, and so is the future of our younger generation because of crass stupidity.

And Trump, who is currently in Scotland seems to think that they are happy with the outcome! I can't wait to read about a summit of the UK and US leaders, Boris Johnson and Donald Trump. Suddenly Siberia seems to be a very attractive place to live.

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Re: The dumb row votes

If you're new here, then you will be happy to hear that I've already predicted Trump's loss this November in previous posts. He's a fraud, he's out of money, and out of class. HRC will be the next POTUS. It is decided already.

"I don't think that the education system can be held to blame"

That IS the education system; vote for something you have NO IDEA the outcome of, then get the "lesson" in a few years. While you're waiting, do take the time to research more friendly, progressive nations as an alternative. The US is chocked full of bible-humping, gun-fucks, but the two coasts are fairly free of this brand of low-IQ "thunkin'." AUS, NZ, Japan, many EU nations, heck I'd consider Iceland as a residence, they all seem nice. Anyway, you have options. Old people just have their angry brains which fail at "new things." It is known.

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Anonymous Coward

I'm rather surprised at the restraint shown in commentard sarcasm towards sour grapes from those whom (i) would have insisted that 0.1% victory for remain must be respected with no repeat vote and (ii) failed to mention their concerns before they lost.

For the anonymous record, I voted leave with some thought, seeing arguments on both sides. I would have seen a remain vote, however narrow, as granting some democratic legitimacy to the current arrangements which I voted against.

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Silver badge

Given that parliamentary votes stand or fall on the basis of a simple majority I cannot see why the outcome of a referendum should be any different. I don't recall anyone protesting that our integration with all things European may have been achieved with tiny majorities in the HoC.

Those protesting about the outcome of this vote are no better than the Eurocrats who enforced repeat votes (see Ireland) because the first vote produced a result they didn't like.

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Anonymous Coward

I would have seen a remain vote, however narrow, as granting some democratic legitimacy to the current arrangements which I voted against.

You used your (likely) once-of-a-lifetime-game-changing-vote (unlike the general elections)... as a protest vote against "the system"?

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Anonymous Coward

Nope. I used my (likely) once-of-a-lifetime-game-changing-vote for leave. I meant it. I would have accepted a remain result as democratic. I mean that too.

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Silver badge

Might I ask why?

What were the top few things you wanted to get?

I ask because I have yet to see any reason at all that stands up to the cold light of reality.

They either don't exist are cannot happen.

Please reassure me that something the Leave campaign promised can actually happen.

Other than Boris for PM, I mean.

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Silver badge

The Elephant in the Room

I prefer to look at the Brexit vote and see more than half of Britons standing up and rejecting decades of neo-liberal punishment.

Right now the powerful in Europe (and likely elsewhere) are soiling themselves at the thought that "Those People" might just figure out how to vote in a group that won't sell the country off to the lowest bidder.

If the Greek anti-austerity vote scared them, this must have them in a total panic.

What the right wing has tapped into is pretty simple: there's a large and growing part of the population who are worse off economically than they were thirty years ago, and who can see that there's no likelihood of that changing.

Sooner or later there had to be a tipping point, and this may be it.

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