back to article Windows 10 free upgrade offer ends on July 29th

Microsoft has announced that the free all-you-can-eat Windows 10 upgrade buffet will close forever on July 29, and that after that you'll have to pay for all the fun of its latest operating system. US$119 is the price Redmond has set for the Home version of the operating system. A sales person in a live chat session on the …

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Pint

No more nagware?

Does that mean that after July 29 Windows 7/8 users will be left in peace?

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Re: No more nagware?

No, by the 30th we will all be receiving emails stating that 'due to the great success of the free upgrade Microsoft will be extending their offer to december 31st.'

After that, rince and repeat.

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LDS
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Joke

Re: No more nagware?

No, it will encrypt your disks and ask to buy and install Windows 10 to restore them. You will be able to pain in bitcoins, though.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: No more nagware?

"No, it will encrypt your disks ....."

But why the joke icon ?

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LDS
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Re: No more nagware?

Because someone wrote MS actually reads these forums. I don't want to be accountable for any idea I could give to Nadella... <G>

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Re: No more nagware?

An idea is an idea, no matter what icon you attach to it.

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Re: No more nagware?

"Does that mean that after July 29 Windows 7/8 users will be left in peace?"

that seems to be the MAIN concern for a lot of us. I fear it is NOT the case.

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Re: No more nagware?

"Because someone wrote MS actually reads these forums."

But do they recognise jokes when they see them?

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Re: No more nagware?

Encrypting the disk is a feature, not a bug. Certainly, I feel better knowing the external drive has bitlocker protection so I can leave it lying about a bit more easily.

Also, the phone OS does it, off by default though I think, not mine though.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: No more nagware?

> No, it will encrypt your disks and ask to buy and install Windows 10 to restore them.

Hey, can the update actually update a PC with an encrypted disk? Mine keeps failing and then insisting on downloading the whole damn thing again... and again. Seems lots of reports of this failing for encrypted disks.

So I guess they'll have to force you to install.

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Gimp

Re: No more nagware?

"But do they recognise jokes when they see them?"

The W10 rollout suggests that either they don't.

...OR... they have the wildest, most deeply twisted sadomasochistic sense of humour I've ever heard of.

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Joke

Re: No more nagware?

"But do they recognise jokes when they see them?"

Unless they are the ones they keep writing and foisting on poor PCs, then maybe...

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Re: No more nagware?

We have Windows 10.... so clearly not.

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Re: No more nagware?

Yeah, Nadella reads the forums himself probably and he is the only one who disliked the first 4 posts in this thread. ;)

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End of the "Nag"

I wonder if this will herald the end of the "Windows 10 Installer" nagware

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Re: End of the "Nag"

No, the nagger will need an update to accept credit cards, and then the malware which looks exactly the same will start.

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Redmond's now hustling the holdouts to upgrade in the few remaining weeks Windows 10 will be gratis.

That's probably the scariest line in the article... What's up their sleeve to push us harder?

six billion queries sent Cortana's way since launch

So out of 300M "devices", that's only 20 queries per. Everyone turning it off maybe?

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"That's probably the scariest line in the article..."

Good choice of word with hustling, though. As a verb its definitions include forcing through, and as a noun it can mean a con.

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Terminator

What's up their sleeve to push us harder?

It will happen this way. You may be walking. Maybe the first sunny day of the spring. And a car will slow beside you, and a door will open, and someone you know, maybe even trust, will get out of the car. And he will smile, a becoming smile. But he will leave open the door of the car and offer to give you a lift...

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Paris Hilton

The Last of Us

Microsoft has announced that the free all-you-can-eat Windows 10 upgrade buffet will close forever

More like "just what we give" buffet?

US$119 is the price Redmond has set for the Home version of the operating system

HA HA HA! Well incited, Redmond!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The Last of Us

All-you-can-eat as in foie gras

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Re: The Last of Us

So they'll pay me $119 to install their adware-ridden OS on my PC?

It's not enough.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The Last of Us

Tried it on a new machine I had just built. Spent a few days on the disk, then was purged with extreme prejudice and replaced with OpenSUSE Linux. I could not believe how clunky the user interface was!

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Re: The Last of Us

If you were an ordinary user you wouldn't be saying that.

Regular people are prepared to spend extra money to get Windows, or even more money to get Mac OS, rather than accept the Linux OS for free.

That is how regular people feel about Linux -- so lame they will pay money to avoid it.

They want something that doesn't require skill.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The Last of Us

Advertising budgets are probably the biggest deterrent to greater acceptance of many fine Linux Distros. MX-15 and LinuxMint are excellent distros, but most home users don't know about them, although LinuxMint does have some name recognition.

I use MX-15, and it is excellent, at home and the biggest problem I see with it for most home users is that, occasionally, I have to use run apt from the command line to remove replaced software. It is not hard to do and the installer gives you the command to copy and paste and the MX-15 site has many great video tutorials made by the folks who keep the project running, but I've always thought that having to use the command line would frighten a lot of my friends.

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Re: The Last of Us

Regular people are prepared to spend extra money to get Windows, or even more money to get Mac OS, rather than accept the Linux OS for free.

That is how regular people feel about Linux -- so lame they will pay money to avoid it.

I think you underestimate the comfort factor of an OS that comes preinstalled on a computer, and doesn't require any thought or effort on the part of the user.

If every PC in the world was supplied with Linux (or some other free OS) and Windows was something one could download for free and install oneself then most people would stick with the free thing and not bother with Windows.

Most people don't care which OS they have (unless they have a specific need to run a particular application) they just don't want to have to learn anything or do anything technical for themselves.

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Roo
Windows

Re: The Last of Us

"That is how regular people feel about Linux -- so lame they will pay money to avoid it."

Or to look at it another way. They get mugged by the salesman into paying for a pre-installed copy of OS/X or Windows.

The actual process that a regular person goes through to get Linux is:

1) buy a new machine with OS/X or Windows pre-installed.

2) discover the pre-installed OS has a completely different UI from the one they are used to, and it doesn't support their existing peripherals, software and work-flows despite being advertised as being compatible.

3) try to get "support" from the vendors, discover that the vendors are incapable of providing support or simply don't provide support to "regular users".

4) find a Linux with screenshots that resemble WinXP, try it out on a USB stick.

5) click the install button, and I find that on 70% of cases they never to boot the pre-installed crapware again.

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Re: The Last of Us

@WatAWorld

You're displaying a fairly common human trait: thinking that your experience is universal. Those of us who have been zapping Windows in favour of Linux for friends, relatives or clients have a different experience. Clearly this isn't one that you're going to share; from what you say it seems likely it would be outside your comfort zone although you'd probably be surprised to find it wouldn't be outside your capabilities.

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Re: The Last of Us

Then you have a way to undercut other computer sellers who must pay for the Windows licence, or at least will soon.

Sell a range of computers and laptops that have a free OS for $50 less (or whatever the OEM cost is for W10).

These days of $300 laptops actually working means $50 is a huge reduction.

Since the user 'does not care' and placing an OS on the computer that 'looks' like Windows used to look at least is easy enough, this sounds like a massive money-spinner.

I couldn't afford to build such an enterprise but then I wouldn't risk it anyway.

But I would love to see someone else do it and prove the point once and for all.

Given that we hear MS have no power or control over OEMs etc., the time must be ripe.

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Re: The Last of Us

I think you're still assuming too much about the average computer user. To the majority, a computer is an appliance. They buy it, plug it in, and use it. They have no grasp of replacing the OS with something else. That would be akin to removing the control panel from the microwave and installing a different one.

I know, because whenever someone is asking me why their computer is so slow (IE filled with crapware, pop-ups, and toolbars) their question is "Should I just buy a new one?", and when I explain how to do a wipe and reinstall, they're astounded by how fast it is afterwards.

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Re: The Last of Us

"Sell a range of computers and laptops that have a free OS for $50 less (or whatever the OEM cost is for W10)."

It's been tried and there are two problems. Firstly, it turns out that the cost of an OEM licence, at least to a large reseller, is nearer $10 than $50, so the price reduction is wiped out. Secondly, it turns out that the cost of an OEM licence, at least to a large reseller, is *only* nearer $10 than $50 if the aforementioned reseller does *not* offer a non-Windows alternative.

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Re: The Last of Us

"So they'll pay me $119 to install their adware-ridden OS on my PC?"

Unfortunately, no.

This is a threat, "Upgrade now, or when we force you too, you'll have to PAY!!

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Re: The Last of Us

Actually;

"That is how regular people feel about Linux...

They want something that doesn't require thinking."

Most people will put up with any cost or tribulation to avoid having to think, even if a second's thought would make life much easier.

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Re: The Last of Us

> Regular people are prepared to spend extra money to get Windows, or even more money to get Mac OS, rather than accept the Linux OS for free.

But they don't "spend extra money to get Windows". Most people can't avoid paying for Windows, the computers in retail shops are not cheaper when Windows is overwritten.

Your "more money to get Mac OS" is also misleading. Apple computers may be cheaper than top-of-line Windows computers. In general, MacOS upgrades are cheaper than Windows upgrades.

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Re: The Last of Us

> They want something that doesn't require skill.

Is that why you use Windows: because you don't have any skills ?

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Re: The Last of Us

> It's been tried and there are two problems.

There are more problems than that. Retailers selling Windows have the ability to up the revenue, and profit, by selling 'essential' addons, such as Nortons, Office, games and such which they would not have with equivalent Linux machines. Also they know that within three years the Windows machine will slow to a crawl as junk accumulates and they will 'need' a replacement that will be so much faster (though a re-install from scratch will do the same). Linux machines tend to last must longer - machines running here are between 6 and 14 years old.

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Re: The Last of Us

@Captain Daft

RE: "Most people will put up with any cost or tribulation to avoid having to think, even if a second's thought would make life much easier."

To be honest, installing Linux doesn't really make your life any easier for a non expert user; perhaps not even for an expert user - just a bit different. There are still the same concepts of programs and disks and memory to force into your head, and things still operate in pretty much the same ways with task bars and menus and buttons to click. And then you have to be told why all those programs you bought from a shop, or downloaded from a website, will not work on your machine. Its just different sides of the same coin, which is trite but true. Things still go wrong and stop working and bugs still pop up gibberish messages and you will still on occasion feel like dropping the thing out the window onto the concrete before that amazing tech friend comes along and amazes you some more by fixing it in 5 minutes. Windows, Linux, or OSX - You will still feel the pain of mysterious things going on. Its just that your amazing tech friend will be happier or sadder depending upon which operating system you are using so you go along with him (or her) and smile at appropriate times just to make him (or her) happy and feel appreciated. They will not really understand why you are angry/sad/happy/tearing out hair because of an operating system. They wont even understand what an operating system is, even if they nod encouragingly at you.

If your non expert users appear happier under Linux they are probably just humoring the strangely obsessive nerd who keeps the machine working for them. They might even feel a bit sorry for you but they wont say it.

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Re: The Last of Us

To be honest, installing Linux doesn't really make your life any easier for a non expert user

Manifestly untrue! None of the recent converts to Linux that I know of have complained about the following:

* The discovery that all of your data allowance has been disappeared for "your convenience".

* Being nagged to convert the system you are used to to one where you can no longer find what you need.

* Being told to wait while the system updates itself, sometimes for hours.

* Discovering that the update has replaced the most recent and stable version of a driver with an older and buggier one.

So far (and this may change) the users I know who are now running Mint do not need support. They interract with their computers to browse the web and access email via their web browser. A smaller number generate documents with Libre Office. I spend vasty amounts of time basking in the thankyous for "fixing my machine" compared to when they were running W7. Not once in the better part of a year have I heard the plaintive cry: "Help! My computer's stopped working; the Internet's broken; Why has my computer slowed to a crawl!"

It's a reitiree's dream :-)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: The Last of Us

I've found Zorin Linux to work really well for those of my neighbours who are truly computer illiterate. I bang on about how much I like the Zorin and MX-15 distros so I should mention that I have no relation with either other good usage experiences.

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Re: The Last of Us

I'm sick of people who keep implying like parrots that in order to be able to use Linux you need to have some kind of "special skill". Are you still living in 2006? I find it *far* more complicated to install Windows with all the drivers and apps these days than any Linux distribution, and especially if installing it on a laptop. Get informed, mate. Stop talking from your behind.

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Sounds like a winner

So the people who wanted it got it for free, and the people who don't want it are somehow going to pay £99 for it?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Sounds like a winner

the people who don't want it are somehow going to pay £99 for it?

Only if come the 29th WIndows 7/8.1 deteriorates rapidly such that they're forced to upgrade.

But Microsoft wouldn't deliberately degrade these OSs would they?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Sounds like a winner

yes, because if you somehow overlooked (lol) the free upgrade, there's nothing better to spend your 100 quid on, than on the (ex)free upgrade some time in the future.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Sounds like a winner

especially if there's a Minty taste in their mouth

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Re: Sounds like a winner

Maybe someone in marketing read the story of Tom Sawyer and the task of painting the fence?

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People will do what they did before

Pay for a new operating system when they buy a new computer.

They'll pay for an MS operating system, a few will pay even more money for an Apple operating system, and an even smaller number will accept Linux, the OS that Torvalds has spent his life trying to give away for free.

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Re: People will do what they did before

You're only partly right. Most people absolutely get their operating system at the time of purchase. So when people buy a new endpoint:

Most will get an Android-based operating system.

Many will get an Apple operating system.

Some will get a Microsoft operating system.

Almost none will get a non-Android Linux operating system.

---

When people buy a new server:

Most will get an Open Source hypervisor (Xen or KVM)

Many will get VMware as the hypervisor.

Some will get a Microsoft hypervisor.

Even fewer will get Linux on metal to run Oracle databases.

Very few will get a mainframe or run a metal OS for non-Oracle purposes.

---

Microsoft isn't top dog on servers or endpoints.

Thank Jibbers. It's about fucking time.

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Roo
Windows

Re: People will do what they did before

"They'll pay for an MS operating system, a few will pay even more money for an Apple operating system, and an even smaller number will accept Linux, the OS that Torvalds has spent his life trying to give away for free."

The vast majority of "pre-installed" OS/X & Windows licenses sold to end users are "free" at the point of purchase, so no different from the "regular person's" point of view then.

Sneer as much as you like as you sit on your pile of shillings, but your sneering won't stop people using free software because it's addressing requirements that vendors are unwilling or unable to address. That hasn't stopped the vendors from taking code and ideas from free software though and sell the same stuff onto their punters for money, TCP/IP stacks being just one small but very important example.

Also your sneering won't make Win 10's UI less ugly, so maybe you should bite the bullet and move onto something that's easier to use and nicer to look at.

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Re: People will do what they did before

"Most will get an Open Source hypervisor (Xen or KVM)"

KVMs market share is about 1%.

"Some will get a Microsoft hypervisor."

Hyper-V has over 30% market share.

"Microsoft isn't top dog on servers or endpoints."

According to Forbes, Microsoft have about 75% market share for servers.

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Re: Sounds like a winner

"But Microsoft wouldn't deliberately degrade these OSs would they?"

My experience is that they already have done.

For testing purposes, I have maintained a number of machine images for various OSes over the last decade or so. They are "clean" images in the sense that they contain only the basic OS. If I actually want to use them, I make a copy of the disc image and install whatever I want on the copy, then discard the copy after I've finished with it. The only action that the pristine images see is that they are exposed to Windows Update every month or two. A fairly easy life for an OS, you might have thought.

Near the end of XP's life, the XP images were taking half an hour or more to crawl through Windows Update. Perhaps the accumulated cruft of over a decade of patches was finally beginning to take its toll, I might have thought ... except that I'd seen this before.

My Vista images showed the same symptoms after just 2 or 3 years, to the extent that they eventually updated themselves into a state of unbootability. Faced with the choice of re-creating them from scratch and re-applying several years of patches, or just not supporting Vista anymore, I initially took the former option but after the second or third repetition of this self-inflicted death I just gave up on Vista, about a year before giving up on XP.

I've been seeing similar slow-downs on my Win7 images for a couple of years now and one of them turned up its toes the other month. I haven't replaced it. I don't honestly believe that MS are giving it any love. It is "out of support" in all but name.

Windows Update is a deeply, deeply, crap piece of software that is slowly killing off all of Microsoft's OSes. Win10 is currently offering a temporary respite, since the Win7 images that I've allowed to upgrade have lost about 10GB of disc usage and knocked about half an hour off the time taken to apply updates. However, I expect it to "grow old and fat" in the same way, and Microsoft's proud boast that this is the last ever release (because they are moving to rolling updates) scares me. For the last 15 years, a completely new release from a clean ISO has been the cure for MSI-related sclerosis. Are we/they about to lose that?

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