back to article Microsoft has developed its own Linux. Repeat. Microsoft has developed its own Linux

Sitting down? Nothing in your mouth? Microsoft has developed its own Linux distribution. And Azure runs it to do networking. Redmond's revealed that it's built something called Azure Cloud Switch (ACS), describing it as “a cross-platform modular operating system for data center networking built on Linux” and “our foray into …

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Finally hired someone who knows good software

Probably told her they were a .com startup until after the hook was set.

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Linux

Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

U-ho.

Their mobile efforts also failed, so their only way forward was infiltration. Is this the way we'll see Linux on the desktop then?

Maybe we could ask cortana.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

Oh clever, sneak in an advert.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

I have a .exe startup - do I win?

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

>Oh clever, sneak in an advert.

Oh look I just used the report button for the like the first time ever on that garbage (original post he is referring too) and I have been on this site for well over a decade. I never even had too with either Matt B or Eadon. Trolling I can deal with (I borderline do it some would claim). Work from home for $87 an hour garbage not so much. Everyone should report the third post up from this one.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

I can't see Microsoft's version of Linux being any better than their own desktop software.

What I can see are patient and copyright lawsuits by MS against the established Linux world.

The DoJ needs to revisit the breakup of Microsoft into Office software and operating system software.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

>Work from home for $87 an hour garbage

Really, I mean!

Who works from home for less than $92.26 these days?

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Alien

Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

>Who works from home for less than $92.26 these days?

Wouldn't fart on the cat for less than $317.79

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

DEAREST PAUL STAN,

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I AM CHIEF WUNDERBUND OF DOCKERFILE INC. REGISTERED IN THE GLORIOUS REALM OF TEXAS. WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED $100 MILLIONS AND NEED A TRUSTED PARTNER TO INVEST THIS.

WOULD YOU BE ABLE TO GUIDE US IN THE MUNIFICENT VENTURE?

ALL WE WOULD NEED IS $87.40 IN AN UP FRONT PAYMENT TO GRANT YOU ACCESS TO OUR CONTAINERISED MONEY BIN. THIS IS TO BREAK THE ISOLATION INHERENT IN THESE CONTAINERS.

LOOKING FORWARD TO TALKING MORE AT YOUR LEISURE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

Presumably they only did this because it was cheaper and easier than recompiling Windows for these ASICs. Surprised the performance is good enough though. As anyone who has tried really high end connectivity like Mallanox or 40GB Ethernet, the Windows network stack significantly outperforms off the shelf Linux - which doesn't support features like TOE without custom kernel hacks.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

" the Windows network stack significantly outperforms off the shelf Linux "

Ahahah !

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

And what has the cat ever done to you?

[Unless it's the neighbour's cat that keeps shitting in my garden. Then I'd say nuke it!!]

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

DoJ and MS are the same thing anymore. Just different logos.

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Mushroom

@"paulstan"

Why does e v e r y . s i n g l e . o n e . of your posts* end with a link to www.windocks.com? Are you trying to use El Reg to drive up traffic to a little www.windocks.com ad farm you're running?

*with the exception of the ONE that was censored by El Reg (above) to remove the invariable www.windocks.com spam.

PS. I just went through all your posts and pressed the "report abuse" button on each of them, on account of the brazen spamming. Hope you don't mind.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

How many BSOD can MS program?

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

"Surprised the performance is good enough though."

Why? For starters the OS doesn't move frames in a switch, it's just there for abstracting management of the actual ASIC(s).

"As anyone who has tried really high end connectivity like Mallanox or 40GB Ethernet,"

That would be me. And in reality it depends on many more factors than just the OS, such as NIC chipset and driver quality. For many day-to-day tasks I've seen little discernible different between Windows and Linux at 10G or 40G. I've found Linux (and *BSD) often pull ahead slightly once you increase the frame size (who doesn't these days?) but in reality it's hardly enough to bother writing home about.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

"I've found Linux (and *BSD) often pull ahead slightly once you increase the frame size (who doesn't these days?) but in reality it's hardly enough to bother writing home about."

Not my experience - high bandwidth / low latency networking is almost always faster on recent Windows versions than Linux (can't comment on BSD) - examples I have seen tested being as an NFS server - and as a SMB server (using SMB Direct) it's way faster than any Linux option I have ever seen. Does Linux have an SMB Direct driver yet? The Samba team were "working on it" 2 years + ago...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

"Why? For starters the OS doesn't move frames in a switch, it's just there for abstracting management of the actual ASIC(s)."

That makes more sense, thought this was the OS routing the packets. Which Windows tends to do very well these days due to the fully modular network stack, and better native hardware integration - for instance TOE and RDMA support is a native part of the OS, not a bolt on.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

Jesus

RICHTO's in the the house.

I had a feeling this thread would attract the attention of MS marketing/pr.

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Re: @"paulstan"

>PS. I just went through all your posts and pressed the "report abuse" button on each of them, on account of the brazen spamming. Hope you don't mind.

Good for you but did you have to give his/her shitty company more press by repeating its name multiple times? Would have given you an upvote otherwise.

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IT'S A TRICK

They're going to do to Linux what they've done to Windows; ruin a good thing and remove all business and consumer interest.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

On the contrary, as this software is based on Linux, which is GPL'd - remember why MacroStuffed hires hundreds of corporate lawyers? - I'm eagerly awaiting my copy of all of the source code for this software, because the GPL requires that, and Microsoft hates software piracy and people who don't comply with every letter of their software licence, doesn't it? :)

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

> I'm eagerly awaiting my copy of all of the source code for this software, because the GPL requires that,

The GPL only requires that the source code be available to those who receive the software. As the software is only distributed internally then there is no requirement for source code to be made available outside.

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Re: Finally hired someone who knows good software

.... err...

The __BSD___ network stack significantly outperforms off the shelf Linux.

Yes I guess it would.

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Anonymous Coward

"Microsoft Linux" ?

Sounds about as appetising as "Oracle Java".

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Devil

Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

Actually sounds as appealing as "Microsoft Java" . Windows extensions coming to systemd?

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

Or perhaps that stuff they sell from the rolling Roach Coaches & leave you glued to the WC for hours afterwards in a case of the Flaming Farts?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

Windows extensions coming to systemd?

Oh my... The apocalypse is coming, after all.

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

"Windows extensions coming to systemd?"

Embrace and Extend! I'm wondering if Nadella thought "Why the f**k did we bin Xenix? Sort out a replacement!" and Azure is currently just the test platform :o)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

> Windows extensions coming to systemd?

Maybe systemd was an MS plot all along

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

> Maybe systemd was an MS plot all along

No - MS itself was an early systemd manifestation...

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

I thought Systemd *was* a MSWindows extension...

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

Just port office over to Linux, that's enough for me.

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

again. (stack code, nt.)

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Pint

Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

Or even "Microsoft Zune", another typical microsoft catch-up "me too" failed experiment, fit only for posters on tech forums to mock by constructing fake names from.

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

They missed out Windows 9 and you wondered why. Now the fog is clearing. MS Windows 10. MS Windows X. MS X Windows? Coming to a desktop near you soon, in your dreams. Or nightmares.

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Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

Systemd changed Microsoft's mind.

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Thumb Up

Re: "Microsoft Linux" ?

It's going to be called Xenix ME.

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Anonymous Coward

What are they going to put on the case? redhat Inside

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RedmondHat Inside

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What you did there.

I see it.

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RedmondHat Inside

Sounds like a Dutch Cap.

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> RedmondHat Inside

More likely Redcap inside..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcap

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Re: RedmondHat Inside

"focuses on feature development based on Microsoft priorities"

What will that get us? Switches to make sure that Windows 10 Desktops will never loose their route to Redmond HQ so they can phone home?

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Happy

It actually sense at the coding level. If you're building SDN across that many combinations, it's almost certain that Linux is your lingua franca. Unless you really are a complete masochist. Oh, that's right, Balmer's left the building so scratch the master Sadist from the list.

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Network switches have been running Linux-based firmware for ages

Ethernet switches have been using Linux-based firmware on the inside for ages - especially the lesser known brands / switch vendors. Cisco traditionally had their own in-house IOS, but I seem to recall that some more modern IOS strains on some HW platforms are actually linux-based too... Other popular operating systems to use for firmware are the various BSD flavours and various RtOS'es (QNX, VxWorks and the like). The CPU cores used in switching hardware (= what actually runs the firmware code) are typically PowerPC, ARM, or MIPS - Linux supports all of them. If the Ethernet switch chipset makers provide some reference firmware platform, it will most likely be Linux. So if someone like Microsoft possibly decides to develop their own firmware for some 3rd-party OEM switch hardware, Linux is a very logical choice. That's where they're likely to get the best technical support, needed to bootstrap Linux on the management CPU core, and in terms of drivers and API's for the specific hardware (L2 switch matrices, L3+ accelerators, DMA engines, individual mac/phy blocks, various misc IO such as I2C/SPI/GPIO). But I still consider it a little unlikely that they're going all the way from bare metal (Linux from scratch). I would find it more natural if they took whatever reference firmware (Linux) the chipset maker has provided, and port the Microsoft's own user-space tools / API's to it, while possibly bugfixing and modifying the reference firmware a bit in the process.

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Black Helicopters

Hmm switches, NSA uses linux...

[/end funnin']

@Frank:

Interesting you mentioned Cisco, but this was my first thought and the natural business target/opportunity.

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ACS?

I think Amazon might have something to say about using the name ACS. "C" standing for cloud might even reinforce that opinion... No?

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