back to article OHM MY GOD! Move over graphene, here comes '100% PERFECT' stanene

A US, Chinese, and German research team has come up with a new material dubbed "stanene" that could – theoretically, at least – conduct electricity with "100 percent efficiency" at temperatures at which computer chips operate, raising the tantalizing possibility of highly efficient future chippery. "Stanene could increase the …

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Stanene? Really, stanene? I don't care if it converts oxygen into platinum, I don't want to design anything with stanene in it. Scientists the world over are terrible at marketing, how are they going to license something with a name like that?

"Intel processors, now with 50% more stanene." It sounds like an antiperspirant commercial from the '50's.

But seriously, someone in science really should address the whole marketing thing. So few of scientists present well and it leads to talented researchers not getting their fair share of the credit and inferior research getting pushed to the front of the pack because somebody is pushing it. Plus, stuff like this happens. Stanene. Christ.

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Calm down...

Marketing will simply apply a glitzy name if for some reason it's ever marketed to the public (see the pharmaceutical industry).

It sounds like something that is only ever really going to be the concern of scientists and engineers of one form or another. Engineers don't care what something is called; if it works, it works.

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Re: Calm down...

How about Awesomene?

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Happy

Re: Calm down...

I know it'll get renamed something more marketing friendly if it becomes a real thing. I was just joking around because my Pauline joke died before it got started and I fell committed at that point.

The part about scientists getting screwed because they often have trouble positioning their work is true though.

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Bronze badge

Re: Calm down...

More likely than "awesomeene" is "eventualene".

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No chemists here then?

Stannum = tin

which surely makes the name they used a bit obvious and not totally inappropriate

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Unhappy

@Don Jefe

"Stanene? Really, stanene? I don't care if it converts oxygen into platinum, I don't want to design anything with stanene in it. Scientists the world over are terrible at marketing, how are they going to license something with a name like that?"

And I think that's way humour-by-exaggeration rarely works on the internet without an icon.

Or you've just not had you're morning caffeine fix.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Scientists the world over are terrible at marketing

Irrelevant - no matter how stuffed with advanced mathematical and computational algorithms, clever quantum mechanics, devious electromagnetic engineering, hi-tech materials science, etc ... that your phone (or whatever) is, they aren't going to use that to market it. They'll just show an attractive person looking happy while using it.

At "best" the marketeers might name it something sciencey - "quantum", "galaxy" - but even then they only used quantum coz it "sounded cool", and it'll be almost certain that the number of galaxies in your phone approaches zero.

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Happy

@Don Jefe

If you think that "Stanene" is a terrible name, you should try "Urea acid".

That one has been re branded as "Add-blue" - probably to prevent people from refilling the Urea tank by pissing in.

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Childcatcher

"suffix du jour"

Never mind stanene I like "suffix du jour". Quick get onto the Oxford English Dictionary

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Scientists the world over are terrible at marketing

They'll just show an attractive person looking happy while using it.

Mmm, EEE girl.

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"Really, stanene?"

Better than calling it icosihenagene, and adding the strapline "you just can't have enough".

Personally I wouldn't find stanene out of place in the component list of a Terminator, so it's acceptable as a name.

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Unhappy

Re: @Don Jefe @John Smith 19

Yeah, that bombed hard didn't it. It sounded funny in my head.

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Trollface

Re: Calm down...

Well, how about "Instantene"...? It reflects potential higher speed applications, it contains the "stan-" base and it even ends in "tin" (also, it sounds like something out of a Marvel comic, so rule of cool)...? ;)

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pfff

never mind the name...

who'd have thought the boiling point of water was 100 C.

you live and learn here on the register that's for sure.

tell us El Reg, what is the name of the hinge thing half way down my arm ? And is there anyway of stopping getting it confused with the padded bit with the hole in it at the top of my legs ?

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Re: No chemists here

Any literate chemist would have called it Stannene, with a double-n to preserve the short "a" sound. With a single-n it should indeed be pronounced "stain-ene" and deserves all the opprobrium of the OP.

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Re: No chemists here

"Stannene, with a double-n to preserve the short "a" sound."

We could have a whole new Alooooominum war over the pronunciation :-)

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Unhappy

Re: @Don Jefe @John Smith 19 @Don Jefe

Sorry Jefe, didn't realise you were joking. I feel kinda bad now...

The trouble with the Internet is that because there are so many frothing-at-the-mouth crazies spouting all kinds of ludicrousness, it has become very difficult for these jaded eyes to spot the difference between exaggerated tongue-in-cheek humour and genuinely 'serious' comments.

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Coat

You don't like the name stanene... OK, how about calling it something which indicates that it contains tin, and that it conducts with no loss of potential difference.

Or is that a tinpot idea?

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Re: No chemists here

I would have called it Conductron, Voltradex, or Electrene

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Anonymous Coward

Rubbish

A Marketing bod worth his chops would wait until Game of Thrones was back on TV again and then sell it as Stannic Borathium.

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Unhappy

Re: @Don Jefe @John Smith 19

Sadly, not one of your better efforts.

I'm not sure why I got a downvote though.

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Re: No chemists here

Its not a war over pronunciation - the word is spelt differently on either side of the atlantic. IIRC the discoverer of aluminium/aluminum changed his mind on a voyage from Europe to the States. Due to the timescales that information travelled at back then, the aluminium version had stuck fast in GB by the time he got back to this side of the pond.

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Joke

Re: @Don Jefe

Shouldn't that be caff-ene?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: No chemists here

"We could have a whole new Alooooominum war over the pronunciation"

I think you'll find that the disagreement in that particular case is nothing to do with the long 'o' sound used in the US... it's actually the dropping of the second 'i', when it's common throughout the rest of the periodic table to have 'ium' as a suffix, that irritates people.

In fact, I believe I read somewhere that the correct pronunciation was originally used in the US; the change came about because someone made a spelling mistake in an advert or patent document for a method of processing the metal, and it ended up getting adopted as the normal usage simply because his process was the market leader and most widely known.

It just goes to show that even the smallest cock-up can have far reaching consequences...

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Re: pfff

Actually I think you will find that the boiling point of water has not been 100°C for nearly 60 years now. Since 1954 it has been under standard conditions 99.9839 °C, and if you use the ITS-90 calibration it is even less at 99.974 °C. Kids of today eh.

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Happy

Don Jefe, i'm late to the party, as usual but reading the first comment (i got the joke right away) and seeing dozens of downvotes just amazed me.

chin up though, they could have just gone with "stannous fluoride" which was (is?) the common form of fluoride added to toothpaste and all over the ads when i was just a wee one.

imagine having to design circuits with toothpaste!

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Stanene Inside, hmm has a nice ring to it!

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@Stanene Inside

Ha, didn't you read the article, Stanene Inside won't work, its just the Stanene Outside, that's the mutts mound.

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Re: @Stanene Inside

"its just the Stanene Outside, that's the mutts mound."

If we make a Klein bottle out of this stuff and apply a voltage would it turn the universe inside out?

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Re: @Stanene Inside

Quoth John Brown: "If we make a Klein bottle out of this stuff and apply a voltage would it turn the universe inside out?"

Some would argue that this has already happened.

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Been waiting for the Reg to pick up on this

Read about it a couple weeks ago elsewhere. Guess the Reg's science desk must have been on vacation :)

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How about

Hypertin?

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Re: How about

Tinselene? Ribbontin? Or, dare I say it...

..Conductin...?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: How about

TinTin?

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If they made it iStan, then the US would probably invade it.

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As soon as they worked out where it was on the map.....

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They would probably give up looking, close their eyes (yes... the whole country) and stick a pin in a map - and say "that's where it is"

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"As soon as they worked out where it was on the map....."

Well, as a born and raised US citizen, I can attest to the fact that not a single soul in the US could find their own ass on a map, not even with both hands, a illustrated map and three navigators.

That said, people in the US would most certainly buy anything named iStan. It has that magical "i" in front that turns shit into gold.

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"They would probably give up looking, close their eyes (yes... the whole country) and stick a pin in a map - and say "that's where it is""

Wow! You got the majority of US citizens pegged true!

How depressing.

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@Wzrd1

>>>>"They would probably give up looking, close their eyes (yes... the whole country) and stick a pin in a map - and say "that's where it is""

>>Wow! You got the majority of US citizens pegged true!

>>How depressing.

Not half as depressing as me noting that rather a lot of my fellow GB dwellers are just as geographically challenged as our hilarious stereotypical Merkin.

Cheers

Jon

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I can attest to the fact that not a single soul in the US could find their own ass on a map

That's a mighty detailed hypothetical map you have there.

I know plenty of people in the US - myself included - who are quite adept at reading maps, and have a decent grasp of world physical and political geography.

I can be as cynical as the next curmudgeon, but this "boo hoo, no one of X nationality possesses Y skill" cliche that Reg commentators are so fond of has gotten rather dull. Let's try harder in the future, eh?

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TWB

So when do we get a semiconducting version?

This sounds like somewhere along the way to 'super-semiconductors' I invented a few years back. Sadly I am yet to come up with a working prototype - (a bit like Pete 'n' Dud's pill that cures all illness/disease)

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Anonymous Coward

Went out with a girl called Stanene

Australian I think.

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Re: Went out with a girl called Stanene

Sounds more like a Dolly Parton country song.

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Joke

Re: Went out with a girl called Stanene

Nah, the Ozzie doll woulda been called Sheila

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Joke

Re: Went out with a girl called Stanene

Let me guess, you were sitting there thinking "Wow, she's got a big Adam's apple for a girl..."

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Resistance is futile

The heat in chippery is not due really caused by resistive losses but is more a result of capacitive losses.

Each "bit"/transistor holds charge and is, in effect a small capacitor. Every time a bit state toggles from 1 to 0 or 0 to 1, the capacitor must charge or discharge using up energy according to E=0.5 x C xV^2. Toggling billions of those / sec results in the power consumed by the chip.

Changing the resistance of the conductive paths within the chip has little direct impact on that.

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Re: Resistance is futile

Yes but with super conduction nano wire we could build room temperature super conducting memristors that function in the pico second range.

Then HP could put them up on a shelf, join hands and dance around singing "we have something you can't have."

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Re: Resistance is futile

> Then HP could put them up on a shelf, join hands and dance around singing "we have something you can't have."

Nah, HP will let you have them, no problem, you'll just have to sign an EULA agreeing that you won't use it for Oracle SW.

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