back to article Auction opens for rare single letter net domain

The auction of a rare single-letter domain – e.co – has just hit the interwebs, with bids reaching $16,500 in the first 90 minutes. The sale is advertised on the domain itself, with the name pitched as the potential “home to your e-commerce site, education site, entertainment site” or even “to showcase your company's plan to …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Probably Most People...

...will assume a typo and type .com.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

surely

the recent opening of the top level domains to non-latin characters has massively devalued the "rare" single character names.

you could get a nice cheap alternative in è.co or é.co, ê.co ë.co etc

if you were feeling particularly frivolous, even ə.ɔo

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Yeah, but who knows how to type 'em?

Personally, though, I'd go for ░▒▓█▓▒░.com.

5
0
Coat

░▒▓█▓▒░.com

Suppose I wanted to tell a friend about your strangely-named new website: how would I pronounce that?

0
0
Boffin

Pronunciation

"░▒▓█▓▒░", obviously.

5
0
Coat

say "░▒▓█▓▒░"

Excuse me while I find a towel

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Big deal?

I bought a single-letter domain like this myself a couple of years ago. Not by auction though - just through a registrar. It was by no means the last single-letter domain available in that specific ccTLD.... There are still odd ones around if you know where to look.....

0
0
FAIL

scam

Oh look. An artificially scarce resource, abused by marketeers, conning gullible businesses into thinking it makes a jot of difference what their URL is.

The DNS is a marvellous construct run by conmen.

1
0
Stop

Yes, that was my attitude

until I ran into a cybersquatter who put his case very eloquently. His argument ran something like this:

"It's not a scam. It's as perfectly legitimate a business enterprise as real estate. There's a recognised market for domain names, that people are willing to pay for. Short, easy-to-remember domains are like shops on a high street; high-rent, because they get a lot of traffic. People do type in these domains just to see what's there, and that incidental traffic has a monetary value, just like the hundreds of cars seeing your high street shop as they drive past have monetary value. That's why you pay more rent for a shop on a main road, see? Now long, complicated domains are like shops in a back street. Those who look specifically for what you sell might know where to look, but you get no traffic, so it's worth less, see, just as a strip-shop in the 'burbs is worth less than one on a main road. You with me so far?

"OK, now, consider this. Suppose you were walking along one day, and you saw an empty shop in a row of shops on a main road where the rent is $500 a week. You inquire about it, and you find the shop is for sale - for $20. No scam, completely legit, legal title deeds and all - 20 bucks. Can you honestly tell me you wouldn't buy that shop at that price and rent it out for $500 a week if you had half a chance?"

I replied, "Well... of course I would." As you would.

He said, "Exactly. So now tell me how you buying that shop so cheap and leasing it for that 'extortionate' rent is any different from what I do as a domain investor?" (He didn't like the term 'cybersquatter')

I couldn't answer that. If anyone can, I'd be grateful to hear it.

2
0

I'm waiting for ic.ky and s.in

when Cayman Islands and India open theirs for abuse.

0
0
WTF?

Ecommerce?

Having an ecommerce site appearing to come from a dodgy country like colombia is not going to do much to build credibility...

0
0

.co

Reg readers know it comes from Colombia, most folks won't.

There was a fad for companies having .uk.co addresses a while ago. I doubt it was a good idea as people would assume a typo and go to their .co.uk equivalent - probably a competitor

1
0
Silver badge
FAIL

Come on...

Surely there isn't anyone out there still stupid enough to think that a fancy URL makes any difference to anything at all?

If/when this URL does sell, I'm hoping it does so for $1.

0
0
Grenade

Yeah!

I saved a packet by getting a cheap domain name for my start-up. Check out

www.2r494fncwwssr8-3243fs34.co.uk

A sure fire success!! Potential investors should .... (cont. p94)

0
0
FAIL

www.2r494fncwwssr8-3243fs34.co.uk

While trying to retrieve the URL: http://www.2r494fncwwssr8-3243fs34.co.uk/

The following error was encountered:

Unable to determine IP address from host name for www.2r494fncwwssr8-3243fs34.co.uk

The dnsserver returned:

Name Error: The domain name does not exist.

This means that:

The cache was not able to resolve the hostname presented in the URL.

Check if the address is correct.

0
0
Unhappy

Well, arse

Serves me right for getting Peter F Young to set up the site. Although I got a great discount for paying in cash.

Drawing board. Back to.

0
0

We Have A Buyer For www.2r494fncwwssr8-3243fs34.co.uk Willing...

...to pay $3,000,000 (tree millin Dollars) US for your domain.

Please send a deposit of $500 by Western Uinio to Moneybags@419ers.com

0
0

Dot-co Goes Rogue

Relaxing registration requirements for dot-co, Colombia’s country code top-level domain (ccTLD), is value destroying.

The dot-co is what I call a “rogue” TLD. Unlike a signaling TLD, which adds value by steering traffic based on its implied message, a rogue TLD captures traffic: that is, a mistyped dot-com lands Web users on a site where they don’t want to be. Such a TLD is value destroying because it forces the owners of a large number of brand names or high-value generic domain names to register their domain names under dot-co. Moreover, generic.co domain names increase parked Web sites, thereby creating more useless information for search engines and human users to sift through. Furthermore, it dilutes the signaling of Colombia-related domain names.

On the other hand, TLDs such as dot-com, dot-tel, and dot-me have strong signaling value propositions. For example, .com has practically no substitutes for signaling a global brand. TLDs that signal location include country-code TLDs (ccTLDs) and some proposed TLDs such as dot-NYC (which signals New York City). TLDs that signal a particular business strategy include dot-outlet and dot-eco. The dot-tel has a strong use differentiation because it signals the brand owner’s alternative contact information, while dot-me is personal and reassuring, as opposed to the chilly dot-name, which is faceless.

Thus, TLDs fall into two categories: signaling TLDs and rogue TLDs. The latter are value destroying.

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017