back to article Fujifilm Finepix F200EXR

The Finepix F200EXR is the replacement for the Finepix F100fd, which we looked at last January. Although there are a number of similarities between the two cameras – they have the same sized image sensor, optical zoom and camera body – there are some differences too, not least the Finepix F200EXR’s new EXR image sensor. …

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Close, but no cigar

Meh, lack of raw and slow glass make it a no-no at that price.

I am too used to being able to recover shadow/highlight detail now, and shoot handheld in less than floodlit conditions. You expect an awful lot of camera for that price, these days, competition is stiff.

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Anonymous Coward

Aperture Priority on a Compact?

I disagree that having all the aperture stops available is a weakness. Given the small size of the sensor, there is hardly any depth of field control to be attained by such a feature.

Compact cameras have a come a long way in the past few years, and now that shutter-lag has been addressed and wider-angles are the norm, the next challenges left are:

-low noise/high ISO shooting

-improved dynamic range

-Raw output

The Fuji goes a long way on the first two.

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Silver badge

FD?

Does this model still have Face Dectection/Red Eye removal???

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my favourite type of scone!

I like scones in general, but the best were at the canteen of my last job. They looked exactly like the one in the sample shot. One of the few things from that job I really miss.

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Alert

Take a look at..

For low light shooting and solid dynamic range, the Ricoh GR DIgital 3 is nothing short of stunning- even if it does cheat by effectively having a prime lens..

A bit of a specialist/niche compact, but really rather nice..

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Headmaster

Effective

"For low light shooting and solid dynamic range, the Ricoh GR DIgital 3 is nothing short of stunning- even if it does cheat by effectively having a prime lens.."

"Effectively"? It's a 6mm f/1.9 prime lens. No "effectively" about it, unless you mean in the sense that "it has a prime lens and this makes it an effective camera".

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FAIL

Can we keep the fault finding relevant please

There is clearly a horses for courses argument here.

A compact camera is designed to be a simple to operate, point and shoot device. It should be intuitive in use where any user control is needed, and user control should ideally be kept to a minimum.

The target market is someone who wants a simple camera and will probably not be interested or know about the technicalities.

These requirements do not mean that there is no need for enhanced features, just that they should be deployed in an intuitive manner that is easily understood by the novice, or possibly even deployed automatically. Providing a superb picture is the goal.

If you require the versatility of RAW format, you understand why you want it and you have the programs to get the most out of it (Photoshop et al) then you don't need a compact camera, with all the restriction in capability the design and the small sensor gives.

This sort of criticism is as relevant as saying that the only problem with a £2000 Nikon DSLR is that it wouldn't fit in a shirt pocket.

Reading between the lines it would seem that there is plenty of scope to criticise the intuitive nature of the interface - simply apply the mother in law test!

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High-end compacts

"If you require the versatility of RAW format, you understand why you want it and you have the programs to get the most out of it (Photoshop et al) then you don't need a compact camera, with all the restriction in capability the design and the small sensor gives."

Not true; just look at the market for high-end compacts like the Panasonic LX3, Canon G11 or aforementioned Ricoh GRD3 - all compact cameras with full manual control, raw, and other features wanted/needed by advanced users. Furthermore, raw is more precisely about control over the final image: tonality, colour reproduction, that sort of thing. It's better in that images can be made to more accurately conform to the photographer's vision, rather than because of any measurable technical benefit.

"This sort of criticism is as relevant as saying that the only problem with a £2000 Nikon DSLR is that it wouldn't fit in a shirt pocket."

There's nothing wrong with wanting the image- and build-quality of such a camera in a more compact form factor, hence the introduction of Micro 4/3, and cameras like the Leica X1.

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@ Andrew Moore

@ Andrew Moore - I've got one and yes it does has face detection and red eye removal. ;)

If your into diving I bought this camera and the underwater housing for £370. Seems to work very well.

http://www.waterfrontscuba.com/acatalog/Fuji_Digital_Cameras_and_Underwater_Housings.html

JH

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FAIL

@AC Wednesday 18th November 2009 19:37 GMT

"If you require the versatility of RAW format, you understand why you want it and you have the programs to get the most out of it (Photoshop et al) then you don't need a compact camera, with all the restriction in capability the design and the small sensor gives."

You've been living under a stone for the last few years then, yeah?

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Stop

P mode has more flexibility

In P Mode, when you set image size to M (6mp), you will be able to use DR400 while using ISO100. If you are not in 6MP mode then you are not taking advantage of the EXR hardware capabilities of the sensor. The big advantage here is that you can take full advantage of 400% DR without any increase in noise (higher ISO). Even in DR Mode (if set to M - 6MP) you can go to DR800 in ISO200.

When setting image size to L (12mp) the DR is achieived by increasing ISO. This is a software solution and is not any different that what many other cameras are capable of. This also introduced more noise. I believe this is what the review did based on his commment of ISO increasing when using higher DR.

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