back to article FCC chair sides with GoYaSkypIntel in broadband wireless battle

Good news for smartphone users. Bad news for the big name wireless carriers. FCC chairman Kevin Martin has released suggested rules for an upcoming radio-spectrum auction that would allow consumers to attach any device and any application to U.S. broadband wireless networks - without approval from the likes of AT&T and Verizon …

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Jan

why pay when its free

Nice one FCC! If carriers don't have to fork out billions for prospective Umts bandwidth or others 'regulated' communication, perhaps then they can't rip off their customers with overpriced networking services.

Will that visionary move by one countries comission be enough to make a global difference?

Historically, $$$ vs common sense was always at too great of odds...

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Not sure what they hope to achieve

Creating an open access mobile network a la fixed internet great idea. However the net neutrality debate gets a bit hotter in the mobile space. Any operator of this network will immediately become a victim of their own success, as people are freely connecting using their own services.

How do you attribute the right cost/revenue to the right user to allow you to invest in the network so that it performs adequately?

Who says this spectrum won't sell for Billions anyway? Apart from the economics of telecoms no longer supports such lunacy. Still going to cost a lot.

So this "open" network will be expensive when compared to fixed access, may have varying levels of QOS for service categories and will no doubt involve some throttling of blacklisted services such as p2p.

Doesn't sound so great now does it.........

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Not sure what they hope to achieve

Creating an open access mobile network a la fixed internet great idea. However the net neutrality debate gets a bit hotter in the mobile space. Any operator of this network will immediately become a victim of their own success, as people are freely connecting using their own services.

How do you attribute the right cost/revenue to the right user to allow you to invest in the network so that it performs adequately?

Who says this spectrum won't sell for Billions anyway? Apart from the economics of telecoms no longer supports such lunacy. Still going to cost a lot.

So this "open" network will be expensive when compared to fixed access, may have varying levels of QOS for service categories and will no doubt involve some throttling of blacklisted services such as p2p.

Doesn't sound so great now does it.........

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