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* Posts by Dave Bell

1609 posts • joined 14 Sep 2007

MPs attack BT's 'monopolistic' grip on gov-subsidised £1.2bn rural broadband rollout

Dave Bell
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Re: Openness

You're making an argument based on a misconception.

The rural broadband schemes are based on the idea of fibre to the cabinet, not to every individual house.

Fibre is digital. The modulated analogue signal over copper wire is the limiting factor. For me, the wire length drops by ¾, which is enough to notice. There's some wiggle-room from the cable routes between the exchange building and me. It could be a much bigger improvement. It could be a bit less.

The exchange-to-cabinet leg will release a lot of copper, it'll carry all the lines, voice and data, on fibre. But the hardware in the cabinet will need more room. and will need power. Unless you want to have all the phones fail when the mains supply goes down, that means a connection to the exchange, with its battery back-up.

It's hard to see how anyone can provide all this without a local hardware monopoly. And, after a lifetime of dealing with first the GPO. and then BT, and then with ISPs and alternative telcos, I'm left with the feeling that the industry is full of liars.

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Dave Bell
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Boffin

Re: Incumbent get more cash from incumbent fund

I did a quick check, and that certainly fits with the phrase "swathed in bandages", but the alternative definition develops from grass mowing (the strip of cut grass) into a strip or area of land.

Checking Wordnik, I reckon that the distinction it makes between "swathe" and "swath" has thrown you off. The plural formation is ambiguous, and it is one of those slightly obscure words for most people. It's almost a cliche, a bit of a rhetorical archaism in either sense, and I suspect you'd need a connection to farming to have heard the word in day-to-day use.

And all this points up the risks of relying on a single online source. If you miss the "alternative" spelling pointer in Wordnik, you misdirected. British dictionaries are different. We do indeed have two countries divided by a common language.

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No, Minister. You CAN'T de-Kindle your eBooks!

Dave Bell
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MEGO moments

The Statutory Instrument needs to be read by somebody with legal training and knowledge of UK copyright law, essentially a Barrister.

It's a diff file for the Act.

I know I don't understand how some words are used, and they will also depend on other statutes and court decisions.

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Brit game devs WILL get tax relief for, er, EastEnders Game and Legend of Slough

Dave Bell
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This has some easy elements

One of the rules gives you four points for recording the game-dialogue mostly in English.

How about the original version of The Italian Job?

I recall a BBC series from the 70s called Gangsters.

You can get a good few points just from UK-based creation and production. And Lara Croft is a British character, so it isn't hard to add points there.

It needs a little care, but totting up 16 points doesn't look to need the obvious and slightly risible suggestions.

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Research bods told: Try to ID anonymised data subjects? No more CASH for you

Dave Bell
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Re: La La La La

The people here control the purse strings. When you take out these four sources, you don't have much left in the UK. It's not going to stop corporate profit seekers, and these funding sources are not always going to agree, but pissing-off the Wellcome Trust is a very bad career move for a medical researcher. Who would employ somebody whose actions have killed the funding for a research project?

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MPs urge UK.gov to use 1950s obscenity law to stifle online stiffies

Dave Bell
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I suppose the existence of the Obscene Publications Act is a sign that we don't need new laws, but I am reminded of what happened in 1996, and of the confusion over just what is "extreme pornograpgy".

"During 1996 the Metropolitan Police told the Internet Service Providers Association (ISPA) that the content carried by some of the newsgroups made available by them was illegal, that they considered the ISPs involved to be publishers of that material, and that they were therefore breaking the law. In August 1996, Chief Inspector Stephen French, of the Metropolitan Police Clubs & Vice Unit, sent an open letter to the ISPA, requesting that they ban access to a list of 132 newsgroups, many of which were deemed to contain pornographic images or explicit text."

That affair did lead to the creation of the Internet Watch Foundation.

The sticking point for me is that the French letter had a very wide-ranging list of newsgroups, some of them rather blatantly titled to invite illegal content, and many not. It raises the question of who we trust to make the choices. Often, cases that reached juries have ended with acquittal, but the Police and CPS have been known to choose criminal charges which are not heard by juries, or to have hidden part of the evidence.

The whole business of "making" child porn images is an ingenious interpretation of the legal detail which was aimed at photographic darkrooms and printing presses.

As a safeguard, a jury trial is a good thing, but the cost to the accused, emotional and financial, is high even for an acquittal. There's something ugly about the idea of going back to this old law, which is a struggle to fit with the era of the internet. Looking at how the laws have been used, and at the reputation of the Police, having these people say we can trust them just isn't enough.

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ZEPPELINS to replace Goodyear blimps in American skies

Dave Bell
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If helicopters had the same media treatment as Zeppelins when they fall out of the sky, the North Sea Oil industry would have a few problems.

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PAF! MPs go postal over postal location data sell-off by Coalition.gov

Dave Bell
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Re: Ownership matters

I used to live in a house which was one of three buildings on the street which had a different postcode from the rest. That little group included two farms. The uphill part of the street, a hundred yards or so, was all built during the roll-out of the system, and has the same postcode as the much larger downhill stretch.

It would, in terms of sorting for delivery, make at least as much sense if those new houses had been included with the tiny farm-group. None of them are farms now. All of them are at the roadside. Because of how the roadside footpaths were laid out, there's a natural break in access for a postie with one of those handcarts.

40 years ago, I doubt there was any alternative to sending somebody to have a look, unless a manager was prepared to talk to his subordinates. Now it seems the manager is a few hundred miles away, but at least he has Streetview. I doubt he uses it.

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Dave Bell
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Re: Typical Govt b0llox

If it was supposed to boost the share price on flotation, it just adds to the feeling that the price set for the flotation was way too low. We expect some short-term profit, it's the way these things are done, but that huge jump in the share price suggests a mistake was made.

It was an intentional action, but that doesn't mean it was not a mistake.

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Plusnet shunts blame for dodgy DNS traffic onto customers' routers

Dave Bell
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Re: For me there is a basic question

I have not had any problems with the Plusnet-supplied router, although it doesn't seem to have any way of manually setting the DNS server. For example, the Google public DNS server. That has been occasionally useful.

I'm getting decent performance with some demanding software, so I am not inclined to replace it. Some of the big-name brands are known to sell models which struggle with the software I use. The wifi may have a little less range than my old hardware.

Plusnet seem to pre-set a reasonable wifi and admin-access password.

I wonder if the problem is people who have moved to Plusnet and chosen not to replace existing hardware. They make the changes to login, but leave the rest unchanged. It's a tempting option; I have a couple of things I still need to change the wifi settings on.

I know enough to be dangerous, but I also have a well-honed streak of paranoia.

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Psssst. Don't tell the Bride, but BBC Three is about to be jilted

Dave Bell
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I have reason to suspect that there are ISPs in the UK that do not have adequate backhaul capacity for the growing demand for video streaming.

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BT demands end to Ofcom wholesale broadband subsidies for BSkyB, TalkTalk

Dave Bell
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My experience suggests that TalkTalk has been able to make its huge profits by the simple expedient of not spending money. They don't say anything about IPv6, their network becomes overloaded every evening and weekend (My ADSL connection itself has a rock-solid speed), and packet loss was becoming very noticeable. So I changed ISP a few weeks ago.

I am beginning to wonder if TalkTalk were doing something with the line settings, the relationship between SNR and speed setting, because my ADSL connection is running around 150% of the speed TalkTalk provided, and the data delivery isn't choking at peak times. My new ISP has told me I should be getting an ADSL speed about 300% of what TalkTalk gave me, but I haven't seen that myself.

What I do see is a big improvement on what is delivered. We're expecting FTTC here before the end of the year. The improvement I already have makes me wonder if I need it. I am glad I quit TalkTalk.

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MtGox has VANISHED. So where have all the Bitcoins gone?

Dave Bell
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Re: Time to buy

I wonder if the rise and fall since the last crash are the result of speculation. People buy at the low price, see the price skyrocket, and want to get the money back by the end of the tax year, so they can put it into safe, well-understood, tax-efficient places.

And the sort of business typified by the Silk Road crashes. Not enough people are buying.

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Dave Bell
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It's not a simple binary choice. Some of us, even under stress, can write better than others. And it doesn't need "several hours", if you have had a decent education.

But does this anonymous source have to be a native English-speaker?

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Just like Elvis, dead Steve Jobs to appear all over America in 2015

Dave Bell
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"This is for everyone"

Steve Jobs is somebody people will recognise.

He didn't get to send a message to the world from an Olympics Opening Ceremony

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Someone's snatched my yummy Brit COTTAGE PIE – Viv Reding

Dave Bell
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Re: Some say...

That's a myth promulgated by teachers in the past. Spices were crazily expensive. and humans, for entirely sensible reasons, are very good at detecting food spoilage. I remember being told that about medieval times, and later learning that most of the spices were not avaiable at that time. There were local herbs, but many have gone out of use.

School history lessons are sometimes less reliable than Wikipedia.

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Steelie Neelie: ICANN think of more 'credible' rules for internet. (Cough *NSA* cough)

Dave Bell
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If the NSA, GCHQ, and their equivalents were any good, we'd know who the crooks are who, not ten minutes ago, were trying to persuade me that they worked for Microsoft and my computer had reported that I had a malware infection.

It's all in the metadata they collect.

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Google to banish mobe-makers using old Androids: report

Dave Bell
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My phone came with a 2,2 version but there is a cyanogen version for it. That works well. I have a tablet with 3G that is on 4.2 and it's already different enough from 4.4 to be occasionally confusing.

It's swings and roundabouts. Do you want to use a MicroSD card? Or do you want the latest Android version? Neither is a crazy choice.

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Netflix speed index shows further decline in Verizon quality

Dave Bell
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I have my doubts about these figures. On my own line, there is a clear daily variation, and for about 6 hours, every evening, the connection is diabolical. And I can be pretty sure that streaming video just isn't going to work during those times, so I don't try.

I'm not a Netflix customer, but do these averages make these effects less obvious? And if their customers choose to act as I do, will Netflix even notice the low speeds, or will they assume their customers are watching broadcast TV instead?

I'm changing my ISP. There are other problems with the data flows that leave me thinking the ISP network is struggling. It's not really funny that, as soon as I requested the MAC, I was swamped with offers of engineer visits.

I'd already booked the big yellow taxi.

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Patch Tuesday brings Microsoft fixes and Adobe Shockwave update

Dave Bell
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These things could always be done better. I left my computer running overnight to download some stuff, and woke to find the patches installed. I still had to check the download had completed OK.

There are times when an "evil" protocol such as BitTorrent seems to be a lot more dependable. And it must be difficult for anybody running a computer where they can't leave it on overnight, and the downloads+install eats into the working day.

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'No, I CAN'T write code myself,' admits woman in charge of teaching our kids to code

Dave Bell
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Re: Few CIOs or VP ITs can code

One of the problems is the idea, coming out of the world of the MBA, that the guy in charge of the business doesn't need to know anything about the specifics of what the business does.

They don't need to be experts. They do need to know enough to understand the specialists.

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Trials of 'Iron Man' military exoskeleton due in June

Dave Bell
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Sergeant: You removed that bronze nail in its foot, didn't you, sir.

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CCTV warning notices NOT compliant with data protection laws – ICO

Dave Bell
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The detail doesn't need to be readable while you drive the car, but something like a web address and a QR code on the sign seems something of a no-brainer. Might not even need to be on the actual sign, surely a durable stick-on marker could be put on the post.

The way the timetable fades at the bus-stop across the road, a similar durable marker letting us get the timetable via a smartphone would be a good idea.

There have been a couple of bus timetable websites which struggled to get timetable updates from local authorities and bus companies, but I doubt they had a contract, they just searched other websites. There's some long-running local roadworks which keep changing location on travelnews websites: it's still the same railway bridge. I wonder whether any system we see set up for information ever gets an adequate maintenance budget. And then there are a myriad of advertising funded sites, with obsolete data, which flood Google searches.

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STRIPPED DOWN and EXPOSED: Business kit from the good old days

Dave Bell
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Re: Gas masks

This isn't a crazy idea, and modern gas mask filters are proof against some pretty nasty chemicals, but getting the correct respirator and using within-expiry-date filters may be a better bet than a surplus gas mask. I'd be wary of the usable life of the filter, after the seals are broken, and the cost of replacement.

I see on eBay several lots of used filters going dirt cheap. Don't expect them to work. They might be OK for use in a film, rather than break the seal on a new filter, but that's all. Gas masks aren't a wrong answer, but it is important to get the details right.

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Almost everyone read the Verizon v FCC net neutrality verdict WRONG

Dave Bell
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Re: Nice straw man

Even with the numerous competing broadband services in the UK, with highly regulated provision of the actual physical connection, it's damnably hard who is to blame for problems. My physical connection is fast enough for streaming video, but about a quarter of the salesman's headline figure. And the service delivered at "peak times" is less than a quarter of the physical connection speed.

The streaming video seems to have erupted onto the UK market in the last year. And the ISPs haven't kept pace. Worse, they don't seem willing to admit to a problem, or say anything about improvements. Try asking about IPv6. "We have no plans." They should at least be buying compatible hardware.

I'm a geek. I know about this stuff. I've been in business. I know something about contracts. I can't get a straight answer about what they can deliver, or how they will handle a possible upgrade to the superfast fibre-boosted broadband. I even have info on a contract signed to upgrade local broadband, under the subsidy scheme for rural broadband, which BT Openreach apparently don't know anything about.

Net neutrality? I'll settle for a bit of honesty.

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Hopefuls rattle tin for customisable snap together 3D printer

Dave Bell
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Re: Wake Me Up

I was, long ago, involved in this hobby. Not Games Workshop, but the same sort of cast metal figure.

You can make a master-figure from many different materials, and then produce a mould. Making the mould can be done in various ways, and the processes can destroy the master figure. The mould-making processes vary in cost and final quality.

The usual process involves making a mould of vulcanized rubber. The master for making this mould is slightly different from the final figure, the mould wears out, and the master figure may be ruined by the heat and pressure of the process. Games Workshop, building on the collecting element of the hobby, can exploit this limit on production. But even within their product range there are figures which need a longer production run.

There is an obvious advantage in being able toi use 3D printing to make master figures from which to make a mould.

But the printing process affects the possible shapes, and the process resolution sets a limit. One of the classic model soldier figures is the man throwing a grenade, in the sort of pose seen used by the bowler in a cricket match. If you are lucky, he still holds his rifle, but how do you support those arms while they are printed? Can you reliably print the detail of the rifle?

The basic idea of using 3D printing to make a master for a casting process still looks good. But is the result good enough? It is a step beyond prototyping, but does it make sense for the hobby user?

It is all different enough that the hobbyist might do better to go back to the old techniques, of 40 and 50 years ago. I don't recommend the precise method Donald Featherstone described, there are better materials now than plaster of paris, but that 3D Printer looks like a waste of money.

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Haters of lurid supershow CES: The consumer tech market is still SHRINKING

Dave Bell
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Re: What I want...

I see the appeal.

You would have to spend a lot on a multi-function remote which could be programmed for the hardware you want to use. Maybe a smartphone-sized tablet-device is a viable pathway for that, with an IR transmitter and receiver. I am not sure that Bluetooth, or the semi-private radio link standards used by too many mice and keyboards, would be viable. Signals that go through walls may be a bad idea for controlling a media player.

Such hardware does exist now, but it is expensive. The programmable remotes with a list of code numbers in small print seem to be part of a system of continuous replacement using short-lived products.

Yeah, great, and we still feel like we're in a recession. This expensive stuff had better last.

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Dave Bell
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Content is King.

I am not sure there is any content out there which would justify spending money on the next generation of display device. And I doubt people want to buy these expensive new devices without the supporting content and infrastructure. I bought my first DVD player because I knew Fellowship of the Ring was on the way. Now we have Blu-Ray and The Hobbit and 3D, and I am not sure the content is enough better to be worth the full investment, though HDTV is enough better that a Blu-Ray player is worthwhile.

And I am not sure that the visual gosh-wow is matched by the quality of the story-telling.. Good content matters, and a combination of recession and content quality has, I think, hurt the 3D options.

As for infrastructure, locally, at least, video streaming seems to kill the internet every evening. We have a lot said about superfast broadband but it is the non-obvious capacity between the exchange and the rest of the iunternet which seems to be the bottleneck. My ADSL connection gives rock-solid performancem speed and BER, but the ISPs, the people who give us "unlimited" internet, don't look likely to be able to deliver content to match the speed increase of "Superfast".

If I can get a better ADSL speed, I'm not unwilling to pay a bit more. But I wonder if I can trust the promises on offer. Am I wasting money on the streaming video service? It was, at least, a cheap special offer.

At least if I buy a DVD I can keep it, and I know I won't be getting screwed by my ISP.

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Android antivirus apps CAN'T kill nasties on sight like normal AV - and that's Google's fault

Dave Bell
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Have you considered the implications of this for corporate security? Can a company trust anyone on the outside to delete malware, when it's at least possible that the malware has been installed by the NSA? Can you rely on Google? Or Apple? There is at least a chance that a large company could sponsor something such as Cyanogen and have an Android version that they control.

And if you're in a critical job, that could mean that your phone is regularly wiped, and reloaded from a secure source. Though if you're being that careful, the way the actual non-Android part of the phone is programmed is pretty scary.

If you think you might be a target, is there anyone you can rely on?

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Nominet seeks royal approval for pisspoor .uk domain name push

Dave Bell
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What I found interesting about thge example of the Supreme Court of the UK is that it's turned out to be something very cheap for them to do, compared with what the Civil Service was saying to them for years. Maybe some of the admin costs have been glossed over, but it's a huge difference.

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How the UK's national memory lives in a ROBOT in Kew

Dave Bell
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I recall obtaining what was left of my grandfather's military record from the National Archive. Much had gone up in flames in the Blitz, but there was still his medal card. giving his service number, and that let me find when his Military Medal was gazetted.

It's all very well to talk about fire protection and floods, and there's the implication that data on computer systems can be backed up, but, while we don't need to worry about the Luftwaffe any more, does it really make sense for the Dark Archive to be the only copy of the data? Maybe we don't need to know where the back-ups are, but I hope there is an off-site back-up.

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Why America is no longer slurping electricity from Russian nuke warheads

Dave Bell
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There's something that doesn't feel quite right about that 10% figure. Total nuclear power in the USA is 8.4% of electricity generation, so I suspect that the claim should have been 10% of nuclear electricity. Nuclear power plants have closed, but to have ever reached 10% of total power every one would have had to be running on fuel from this source. At the same time. Which, with refueling cycles and the need to keep conventional uranium sources in business, seems unlikely.

So either USEC's press release is a lie, or it was misunderstood.

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XBOX ONE owners rage as HDMI SNAFU 'judders' Brit and Euro tellies

Dave Bell
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It's and very old sort of problem, the different TV standards, and, a decade ago, you could expect to feed an NTSC signal into a SCART socket and get a picture out of your TV from a video. The old analogue electronics were able to handle the different standards, once you got past the tuner modules.

DVD changed that a little, expecially with the region locks, but it was still analogue between the player and the TV.

Want to bet that there's not some sort of region lock entangled with this one?

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Tales from an expert witness: Lasers, guns and singing Santas

Dave Bell
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Re: Couple of points

That's the pattern I recall.

And the teachers responsible also taught other subjects. I failed History O-level. The History teacher was one of the Sports teachers.

Anecdotal evidence, but it supports the thesis that bad teachers can't teach anything.

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Vulture 2 spaceplane STRIPPED to the bone

Dave Bell
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Re: Dihedral

Do we have our first clue to what Vulture 3 will be?

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Google's MYSTERY barges floating off US shores: The TRUTH

Dave Bell
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Barging around

While a century ago the word "barge" covered a range from canal boats to self-propelled coastal vessels, and both Europe and the USA have some quite ship-like objects on their big rivers, it is a word which suggests something of rather limited seagoing capability.

You would need good weather to take such a vessel outside San Francisco Bay. The US East Coast does have a coastal waterway.

If they want a barge in Europe they will have to build it here.

As for what it can do, there are quite a few Exhibition Centres by big rivers and docks. It's been a shift in the use of land as the traditional ports have been redeveloped. I have my doubts about access to such places as Canary Wharf in London, but it could be moored withing walking distance of some pretty big Trade Shows. And then maybe the metal structure makes sense. Instead of Google sharing an exhibition hall with thousands of people wanting to use mobile tech, phone and networks, they can provide their own space, with the clean radio bandwidth they need, and a very fast connection to the rest of the Internet.

It wouldn't hurt for a training course either.

There's a history of technology companies running training courses as promotions for their products. It goes back a long way. Singer did it for sewing machines. John Deere does it for tractors and combine harvesters. And please don't try to tell me these things are not technology. What do you know about how such machines work?

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Planet hopper: The Earthly destinations of Doctor Who

Dave Bell
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How Much Does It Matter

I am assured, on the best authority, that no episode has ever been filmed on another planet.

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Could Doctor Who really bump into human space dwellers?

Dave Bell
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The Doctor doesn't meet humans. He meets humanoid robots who think they are human.

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Google barge erection hypegasm latest - What's in the box?

Dave Bell
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If it were a showroom, I rather think the construction process would be different. Welding shipping containers together doesn't sound quite right.

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Dave Bell
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Re: New World Order prediction...

James Bond is doing chocolate delvery?

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Here's what YOU WON'T be able to do with your PlayStation 4

Dave Bell
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Patent Medicine

It looks as if Dr. Richard Gatling's patent toenail clipper has been bought by another customer.

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'Tablet' no longer means 'iPad': Apple share PLUMMETS below 30%

Dave Bell
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The missing question

I would consider a cheap Android tablet for some sorts of use, rather than risk my Nexus 7. I could use a big MicroSD card and, back home, connect it to my TV as a media player streaming over wifi.

No Bluetooth or 3G, but what do you want to do? And a cheap 7-inch might have the edge on an iPad for slipping into a pocket, though a Kindle is a better ebook reader. But is an eBook all you want?

What do you want to do today? That is the question the surveys don't ask.

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Blighty's laziness over IPv6 will cost us on the INTERNETS - study

Dave Bell
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It is worrying that ISPs seem to be ignoring IPv6, and, the last time I was looking, IPv6 support wasn't even mentioned on the retail packaging of router/modem hardware.

The sudden invocation of privacy concerns is not unexpected, but sticking with IPv4 is not going to stop NSA and GCHQ and their like. They're snooping on us already. My "dynamic" IPv4 address hasn't changed for over a week. It's not like the days of dial-up when the dynamic address was an accident of which ISP modem you were connected to. Should I switch off my broadband connection every half-hour?

My hardware is getting old enough that I am thinking about replacement, chiefly for better wi-fi, but why should I replace it with something that cannot support IPv6? Why should locked into an obsolete system?

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Why Bletchley Park could never happen today

Dave Bell
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In the past, the courts have challenged the excesses of those who police us.

I am not so confident that will happen today. As Leveson said, the non-enforcement of laws against phone-hacking is used to justify new laws, not enforcement of laws. Jr ner abg nyybjrq cevinpl nal zber,

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BT's mobe interference claim laughed off air by ad watchdog

Dave Bell
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Android can help

A quick search on Google Play will reveal several free Wifi scanner Apps. It is dead easy to check the frequency space around you for the best channel.

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Whodathunkit? Media barons slit own throats in anti-freetard crackdowns

Dave Bell
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Streaming depends on having enough connection capacity when you want to watch the material. Round here, on my line, that's not certain during evenings and weekends.

Downloads can come in overnight.

I'm currently struggling to download an ebook which depends on an Intel experimental viewer, and comes in at over 600MB. The whole system seems to assume a high-speed internet connection.

The future is unevenly distributed. So, it seems, is the present.

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Be prepared... to give heathens a badge: UK Scouts open doors to unbelievers

Dave Bell
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Re: Nice to see them catch up with the girls

I think you misunderstand the difference between not swearing by a God and swearing against a God.

In any case, as disputes over infant and adult baptism show, one might question whether a particular child understands an oath or affirmation, without challenging the existence of a God.

What I see is something God-neutral. The new phrase for Guiding is "To be true to myself and develop my beliefs," and I just cannot see how that can be claimed to be a denial of any God. It covers those who believe in a God and, coupled with the rest of the Promise, covers both what and why somebody makes the choices they do.

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Digital 'activists' scramble to build Silk Road 2.0, but drug kingpins are spooked

Dave Bell
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Is anyone telling the truth?

It's generally know that drugs sold "on the street" contain many impurities, some of them safe dilutants, some not. That white powder is unlikely to be pure.

While I have seen recent reports in news media, where a drug was bought through the Silk Road, and was going to be analysed to check it was what it was claimed to be, I don't recall any follow-up reporting of the lab results. The stories were of how easy it all was.

It might have been worth the dealers supplying a more consistent product. They might have been at a different level in the normal distribution chain, Did the Silk Road have features that allowed them to gain a reputation?

I don't entirely trust what I have heard, about any of the parties involved. They all have reasons to lie, and we know just how often the NSA and the DEA and the FBI collaborate in lies about how evidence was gathered. It's possible that the NSA found a way of identifying DPR by illicit means, not usable in court, and, once they were pointed in the right direction, the FBI have discovered a valid chain of evidence. We know this happens.

Did the Silk Road hurt anyone as much as the armed drug dealer on a street corner? How much damage does it do to us all to know that the security of the internet is illusory. Never mind the Silk Road and Bitcoin, can we trust ebay and PayPal?

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Tesco's new fondleslab winks at Apple's stealthy NFC assassin iBeacon

Dave Bell
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I am a little sceptical about whether this will be useful, but I can see how it stands a better chance with Tesco than with Apple Stores.

You can see how it might look better with Apple's fingerprint sensor.

I am not sure I would want to use such systems, but Tesco has the retail footprint to set the standards.

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Doctor Who to land on the BIG SCREEN and in 3D in November

Dave Bell
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It's not the program, it's the anniversary

This could be a naff episode, and it won't matter much. There are a few shows that last, a few ideas that endure, and Doctor Who is one of them. Fifty years, still picking up new fans, sometimes bad, and sometimes more than good, and I don't see any reason why it shouldn't last another fifty years.

It won't even be the first Doctor Who story broadcast in 3D... And there is all of space and time to tell stories in.

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