* Posts by Dave Bell

1807 posts • joined 14 Sep 2007

El Reg regains atomic keyring capability

Dave Bell
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Re: Just be careful

There's currently a fuss about terrorists using thermite to attack 'planes. The Air Marshall's are fretting because nobody has told them how to put the stuff out. (They're basically undercover DHS armed cops.) Luckily, igniting thermite is a little difficult, because there is no practical way of putting it out.

Or it may just be American journalists who are the idiots.

When I encountered thermite in a school chemistry lesson, the teacher used magnesium ribbon and a bunsen burner to start off the reaction, which you don't find on many airliners.

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Russia considers keeping its own half of the ISS alive after 2024

Dave Bell
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NASA is setting the date

It's not so obvious in the story, but the 2024 date has been set by NASA. Since the ISS depends on reliable hardware, and some of it is getting pretty old, this may have good reasons. And since so much was set by Shuttle-era limits, we have to wonder what can be launched by 2024

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Seven months of Basil Brush on YouTube: Er, boom boom?

Dave Bell
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Mushroom

It might be "Basil Brush Official" on YouTube

There's a YouTube channel called Basil Brush Official which looks to be the right place: a clutch of new videos last Monday, promotional material for the recent live tour, and set up with a Twitter account.

It's not hard to find. I hear the YouTube owners have some sort of search engine.

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Have YOU got Equation NSAware in your drives? Meh, not really our concern, says EU

Dave Bell
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There's something in the disk firmware which leaves it open to this infection. And the same openness may be necessary to Data Recovery procedures.

It would be impractical for these weaknesses to only be in drives delivered to target entities.

Non-government actors can re-program the firmware on their drives. There are people who have described the process on the web, doing such things as installing Linux on the drive's circuit board. There are programmers who still work in machine code and assembler, and can reverse-engineer the firmware.

The cat is out of the bag now. How long before malware is used for terrorism. If you can somehow install your own firmware without any need for permission or physical access, how long before every hard drive in an identifiable IP block gets trashed?

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Think you’re hard? Check out the frozen Panasonic CF-54 Toughbook

Dave Bell
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Re: Kidproof?

I have used a couple of earlier-generation Toughbooks. Heavy machines, near the end of their life, but reliable and good value. Plan ahead. Buy the Toughbook, get married, and the kids will be around to get it when you get a replacement.

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Basic minimum income is a BRILLIANT idea. Small problem: it doesn't work as planned

Dave Bell
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Re: What about inflation?

There are some similarities with the shift of EU farm subsidies from produce to land area, around 1992. Partly because the money became tied to land, and included "set-aside" reducing the area cultivated, the food mountains vanished. Farm-gate prices dropped. Land prices, purchase and rent, shot up.

I can see basic income having some of the same sorts of effect. It's all very well talking about agency, but how can we ever challenge the supermarkets?

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Ex-squeeze me? Baking soda? Boffins claim it safely sucks CO2 out of the air

Dave Bell
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Here in Europe we grow about three times as much wheat per hectare as the Americans. That's enough to swamp the free markets, cause a price collapse, and bankrupt the farmers.

It's not atmospheric CO2 that does that. We're using a lot of energy to produce nitrogen fertilisers, as Europeans have been doing for a century or so. For the last half-century or so we have been using pesticides to control weeds (taking nutrients from the soil) and plant diseases. All these things cost the farmer money, and excess use hits diminishing returns. Mr. Worrall can tell you all about that.

We stopped burning wheat straw in the field about a quarter-century ago. It gets cultivated into the soil and slowly rots, so it isn't good at locking up CO2. But it helps stop soil erosion from wind and rain. Some bright and fast-talking city type have bought the site of a disused sugar factory in these parts and are building a straw-fired power station. but that will take phosphates away from a farm, and they're not something you can easily synthesize. You can get phosphates in sewage sludge, but the heavy metal contamination is a problem, and the supermarkets scream and run away from food grown with that nutrient source.

Industry in general has been dumping toxic waste for centuries. And some of those things don't go away of their own accord. The North Sea is littered with reefs and sandbanks of sewage sludge contaminated by heavy metals. Compared to that, CO2 is easy to get at.

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Calling a friend? Listen to an advert. You lucky, lucky thing

Dave Bell
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Go

It might be useful

I can have a number which uses this "service", which I can put down on all those websites which ask for my phone number, and then sell it to the call-centre advertising industry.

A 5% share of the revenue will be quite sufficient. I have an old "burner" mobile I can use for this.

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UK boffins DOUBLE distance of fiber data: London to New York WITHOUT a repeater

Dave Bell
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That awkward memory moment.

It wasn't until somebody mentioned the Septics that I recalled 80km was 50 miles, near enough.

In my distant youth I measured a field in Chains and Links.

And I can remember MAFF, as it was then, specifying ridiculous precision for land measurement when they introduced a new EU scheme.

Now I can get a laser rangefinder for under a hundred quid. I hope somebody remembers the difference between accuracy and precision: I am not sure the guy writing the Amazon description knows that.

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'Tech' City hasn't got proper broadband and it's like BT doesn't CARE

Dave Bell
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BT can be a bit annoying, but I've never been sure how much of that is the retail side and how much Openreach.

They don't sell broadband under just the BT label.

On what I've seen. broadband retail generally is a business where rogues and vagabonds are commonplace. And the advertising about FTTC seems to greatly underplay the details about the changes on your side of the Master Socket.

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Dixons Carphone clings to EE, Three in Phones 4U bullet dodge

Dave Bell
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Rural England buggered again.

I live in rural England.

Within a mile of a motorway junction and a trunk road.

I shall have to rely on RFC1149 for my fridge. My wi-fi won't get through a stone wall to my kitchen from the office and the trees have got a few more years of growth on them since the phone companies calculated their coverage maps.

This Internet of Things stuff is going to have to be IPv6 so I think I shall have to investigate RFC6214.

Or maybe just walk to the fridge, open the door, and look inside.

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Crackdown on eBay sellers 'failing to display' VAT numbers

Dave Bell
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Re: It is a reality on Ebay and Amazon

It's not too hard to find Chinese sellers playing fast and loose with the eBay system, things like misdescribing goods (and not something that could be attributed to ambiguous translation). Does eBay care? Apparently not. They don't seem to have liability for this tax dodging either.

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'Boutique' ISPs: Snub the Big 4 AND get great service

Dave Bell
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The problem I have with the big ISPs is how they sell their service. They'll tell you what speed they can deliver over your phone line, with the usual "up to" scammery in the general advertising, but eveyone needs a decent speed to the wider internet for streaming video, and the sales side doesn't seem to have any information on that aspect. I am getting wonderful promises for FTTC, but they can't even tell you whether there will be faster delivery of the actual data you want.

One big name has actual staff and a display stand in the shopping precinct in Scunthorpe. They do sell something more than just broadband, but they must be paying a couple of hundred quid a day to get a trickle of new customers.

I want to pay for internet, not for bored, scrioted, salesthings.

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Supersonic Bloodhound car techies in screaming 650mph comms test

Dave Bell
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Live HD video from Bloodhound is part of the pay-off for the sponsors.

I watched the last Falcon launch , and we have come a long way from the days of Apollo, when it needed a cine camera on the Saturn V, and there was no guarantee of recovering the film. We have a few, much-used, shots of the booster seperation. With Falcon, we were seeing the inside of a fuel tank, in zero gravity, live.

We expect more. The Bloodhound team are making sure they can deliver.

Meanwhile, they keep trying with Falcon, and the first successful landing of the booster on Just Read The Instructions is going to be stunning video. We don't need that video to be live but, like Apollo XI, it's something that people will remember.

But why are some people fussing about hoverboards in 2015?

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Does Big Tech hire white boys ahead of more skilled black people and/or women?

Dave Bell
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It is at least possible that there are gender differences in mental abilities arising from basic biochemistry. And I know how my own medications can interact with circumstances to mess up my thinking. So gender differences are plausible, quite apart from the blatantly obvious physical. And if you're looking for unusual abilities, which you have a test for, it's foolish not to test candidates just because they're the wrong gender.

Oh, I might as well mention Rear Admiral Grace Hopper at this point.

Her career started at a time when people knew they didn't know what they wanted.

Today, recruiters are sure they know what they want.

I am not at all sure which is better.

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Your gran and her cronies are 'embracing online banking' – study

Dave Bell
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There's so much of this, both Powers of Attorney and informal arrangements, which fits with my experience. But the banks may have improved, or at least some of them, over the handling of a PoA.

I stick with paper delivery of bank statements because it can be used as a proof of address. The whole business of proving who you are seems to rely on a jumble of possible documents. Can you prove you're entitled to work in the UK without a passport? But a passport doesn't prove your address. The whole Identity Card business of a decade ago could have been an answer to that, but it looked like an expensive boondoggle.

Incidentally, I use paper cheques so infrequently that I still have an unused chequebook that is a decade old, still with the tear-off printed address on the front (windowed envelopes) for my home at that time.

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Uber isn't limited by the taxi market: It's limited by the Electronic Thumb market

Dave Bell
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Uber limits

I don't know what the systems are in the USA, but in the UK we've had "private hire"—minicabs—for a long time, and the Uber service looks a lot like them. That affects the boost to the economy from Uber. We also have, in at least some place, smartphone Taxi-summoning systems, a bit like Uber but for the licensed taxis.

I suspect that some of the Uber-hype comes from the USA, and is based in an ignorance of the rest of the world.

Anyway, the electronic thumb model can make traditional taxis more efficient, and is doing. If you have the number, you've been able to summon a minicab since the first mobile phones. What's new about Uber? It's maybe a little bit easier the finding the phone number in a strange place, but how much of the wealth generated is innovation and how much is from dodging regulation?

Uber apparently doesn't like its drivers to tell insurance companies what they're using their cars for. That's not good.

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SpaceX makes nice with U.S. Air Force, gets shot at black ops launches

Dave Bell
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Re: Huh?

The first-stage booster doesn't even get near orbit, so it's hardly vital to be able to recover it. And SpaceX already have payload return with the Dragon capsule. They're working towards man-rating the system.

But guidance to a floating barge, and crashing on it at the first attempt, does suggest some interesting possibilities. It would need o be done with something like Dragon, which already parachutes into the sea for recovery, and SpaceX have certainly done work on doing this on land. It all looks a bit of a high risk at the moment, but there are possibilities.

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YOU. Your women are mine. Give them to me. I want to sell them

Dave Bell
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A lot of this story seems to have its roots in the procedures set up by the American Digital Millenium Copyright Act. Follow the processes, and a company such as YouTube is safe from being liable for damages.

Cases like this sound a bit dodgy under American law. Since a DMCA notice is made out "under penalty of perjury" is it even lawful to send out notices automatically? It would be expensive to find out.

And sometimes there are overlapping but independent rights. In music, there are distinct rights, and payments, to the songwriter and the performer. It gets complicated, and then the USA has different law (and a long-running "fuck-you" attitude to international copyright laws).

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Euro security agency says MORE crypto needed in gov policy

Dave Bell
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I just can't imagine Mr. Cameron listening to anything coming from the EU.

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97% of UK gets 'basic' 2Mbps broadband. 'Typical households' need 10Mbps – Ofcom

Dave Bell
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Re: Typical households need 10Mbps

I have a suspicion that the awkward part of the network is supplied by the ISP. The wholesale line syncs at sufficient speed for me, but the usable speed I get has reduced. Streaming video needs to sustain enough capacity to be delivered live. If you want to download content to watch later you don't need continuous good speed. That sustained high speed needs to be between you and such things as ISP caching servers for live data deliveries such as streaming video and games.

I've got enough capacity on my broadband line to my house. The internet connections that link my local BT exchange to the world have become the bottleneck, not the copper wire that carries the ADSL.And I am not sure if these figures actually measure anything useful.

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Let it go, let it go ... Sales of games, video and music up for second year

Dave Bell
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Re: Frozen

It depends how you define a good movie.

Disney seem to have got something right, both in the movie itself and how they're building on it. One parent I spoke to said she was pleased it didn't end with an automatic marriage. And there are the sing-along-with-Frozen shows: that is something that seems new. I can remember when this sort of thing was "On Ice"; maybe it still is, but ice skating isn't what it was in the days of Torvill and Dean.

Will the next Disney movie be as good? That's going to be hard to do. But Disney has been making good animation for over 75 years. Not every movie works this well, and I wonder how much of this one has been influenced by the successes of Studio Ghibli. There has been other competition for Disney to face up to. Maybe Frozen is the climax to a golden age of animation that will now fade.

On the other hand, the success of Frozen might revive the competition. Maybe another studio will look at the possibilities and put up more money. In that, this is all like the first Star Wars movie. There were all sorts of more-or-less clones pumped out. And that boom in cinematic sci-fi and fantasy gave us a few really big movies. Would we have had Alien or Blade Runner without the success of Star Wars?

And Frozen might be a good example for a lot of Hollywood movie making, not just animation. It has a pretty smart story to tell. It doesn't just depend on spectacle. Too often I have been left with the feeling that modern film-makers have over-dosed on adrenaline and forgotten the story.

There are other good movies out there. Frozen holds its own against them—it isn't just animation.

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Reg man confesses: I took my wife out to choose a laptop for Xmas. NOOOO

Dave Bell
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Re: @Simon Rockman

If you're an author, selling your work, you may find that publishers expect MS Word to handle the copy editing, and I know some pretty geeky authors who keep a copy for that reason. But it's arguable that that is a pretty specialised use-case. In any case, it's a collaborative edit process, with detailed tracking of the changes, and it would be folly to rely on somebody else getting file import and export right.

For the actual writing, the same people swear by Scrivener. But that comes down to using the right tools for the different jobs. MS Word can create HTML pages, but the last time I checked they were grotesquely over-sized. Libre Office does a better job than the Word which I knew.

I do sometimes wonder if we can make good choices for friends and family. I haven't created a huge file for a couple of years. How much storage space do you need for keeping the letters you write? Do some of the things we worry about really matter?

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Doctor Who's tangerine dream and Clara's death wish in Last Christmas

Dave Bell
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Re: Dr Jr

I am now wondering if the reality is something a bit different, and there never was a face-hugger. The Doctor cracked a joke, it doesn't mean he doesn't know about the film.

See Heinlein's The Puppet Masters for an alternative, though explicitly a parasite that doesn't kill its hosts. The Dream Crabs have some problems there.

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Cambridge boffins and Boeing fly first hybrid airplane over British skies

Dave Bell
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A small internal combustion engine, sized for the cruise regime, can be quite efficient, with a little on top to charge the battery. And the power boost from the electric motor for take-off and climb will be much quieter . With the relatively long cruise, it doesn't need a huge excess to recharge the battery. I doubt this plane has much spare weight, but adding solar panels would be possible.

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Welsh council rapped for covert spying on sick leave worker

Dave Bell
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Re: A Morons perspective

There have been at least two Data Protection Acts, 1984 and 1998, and the second includes "relevant filing systems" which would cover paper records. There is an exemption for criminal investigation, but it doesn't look as though there was anything sufficient to invoke that. And so it falls foul of the Data Protection Principles.

Just looking over the Act, it might have been possible to set out a reason for doing this, but the Council apparently didn't even bother. I've seen some pretty sweeping permission requests from Councils, amounting to a request to ignore the law. And, with more and more privatisation of services, I really don't like how such attitudes could work out.

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Dave Bell
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I didn't even know the person was a teacher...

I did think this was a mismanaged office. I now wonder even more just where the idea for covert surveillance came from.

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Dave Bell
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Re: Early Stage?

I think you're right about the lack of detail. There's something that has been kept quiet. But look at the reason mentioned: "off work with a sick note for anxiety and stress". Combine it with the leap to covert surveillance, and we might have some really bad management here. It's all consistent with a really nasty piece of work running things. But we haven't got enough info to be sure. And this is the Undertaking signed by the boss. The "anxiety and stress" had a cause we don't know about. It doesn't have to be something at work.

But somebody should have been getting a bollocking from the Chief Executive over this.

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Microsoft fires legal salvo at phone 'tech support' scammers

Dave Bell
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This sounds a little bit different from the fake "We've detected a virus" calls, with websites and adverts involved. Here, the investigators called the fraudulent company. Is it really the same people?

Frankly, it's getting so that I can't tell the difference between the crooks and the genuine support lines. They're the same accents, the same sorts of phone-line distortions arising from highly limited bandwidth, and staff with the same "blame somebody else" attitude.

I get more help with my computer problems from my cat (who knows what to do with a mouse).

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EU VAT law could kill THOUSANDS of online businesses

Dave Bell
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Re: This is entirely UNreasonable

I agree about the relative ease of keeping VAT records for a UK-only business. If you are trading over the internet you should have a computer, and a computer program to automatically do the bookkeeping.

But trading across intra-EU borders was always a bit of a mess. Where is the computer software which complies with the new system? I never switched to a fully computerised system. I'll be honest, it can be a bit gnarly for somebody without some specific training, and my business wasn't making enough transactions to make full computerisation worthwhile.

The businesses being affected by this are being hit by a horrible increase in complexity, with a high transition cost in buying new software, training to use it, and testing it.

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Dave Bell
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What is being missed is that Luxembourg set a very low, but non-zero, rate for VAT on ebooks. A lot of EU countries have lower rates for such products, but Amazon is paying a rate of 3%, the lowest in the EU, and I don't recall them ever telling me what the rate is, they just tell us VAT is charged, which is one of those legally murky areas. Italy, next year, reduces their e-book rate from 22% to 2%, and we have always had a 0% rate on physical books in the UK.

It looks as though some guy called Juncker was involved in setting the rates in Luxembourg.

One of the awkward points is that two pieces of data confirming customer location need to be recorded. For physical goods, which have always been under some form of customer-location rule, there's both the record of payment and the address for physical delivery. But what's the equivalent for digital goods?

The more I hear about this (and I used to do VAT paperwork for a small business), the less competent HMRC and the government look in negotiating with the rest of the EU and explaining the changes. Surely six years is enough time for them to have done something?

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UK cops caught using 12 MILLION Brits' mugshots on pic database

Dave Bell
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Re: What's his beef?

Please, don't call Theresa May the She-Wolf of the SS.

She doesn't look sexy enough for a porn movie to make a profit.

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GOOGLE is COMING FOR YOUR CHILDREN

Dave Bell
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One factor is that US Federal Law gives children under the age of 13 a special status on the Internet. They cannot be given an account by an internet service without explicit parental permission.

This actually makes sense, and I think it goes some way towards explaining why Google might be doing this. It's not so much the content as making sure they can do the extra permission checks for the account. Child-safe game apps may still need that extra permission if they need a live internet connection to run.

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How HAPPY am I on a scale of 1 to 10? Where do I click PISSED OFF?

Dave Bell
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Re: Spot on, Mr Dabbs.

In my experience, what saves the London Underground is the presence of the ordinary people of London. Though I managed to avoid the rush hour. London is messed up by the ultra-rich seeking to preserve their precious bodily fluids, every night.

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The Grandmaster: Epic, heart-melting, oh and there's lots of kung fu

Dave Bell
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I miss some of the context for this, but I look at the story outline and think that, in some ways, it's not so different from some Hollywood movies recording the life of an American in the same troubled era. I can imagine elements of The Great Gatsby and Public Enemies in a Hollywood version, but I struggle to imagine Hollywood using such a strong female character.

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BLAST-OFF! BOAT FREE launch at last. Orion heads for SPAAAAACE

Dave Bell
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Re: Great news

Yes.

There's even a song about it.

Kantrowitz 1972 (HEL Crew's Song)

Plenty of sites claim to have recordings and videos, but it's not for nothing that it's known as the net of a million lies.

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Another lick of Lollipop: Google updates latest Android to 5.0.1

Dave Bell
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I am not going to hurry.

Android 5.0 was such a mess on my Nexus 7 (2012 model) that I am in zero rush for the upgrade. I have already used Cyanogen on some cheap hardware, and I shall wait to see what emerges from there. The way Google seem to do things with this Android 5 product suggests that we shouldn't trust them.

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UK national mobile roaming: A stupid idea that'll never work

Dave Bell
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Never Mind the Bullocks (This will go on for heifer and heifer...)

It seems plausible to me that the landscape models used for planning site locations and generating the coverage maps are being used by people who don't expect trees to grow.

And, while the frequencies are different now, I can remember when there did seem to be significant differences between late July and early September as the landscape changed from a thick brush-like surface of ripening wheat and barley to short, rather dry, stubble. Could I have used the combine harvester to have created a waveguide across the top 30-acre?

Meanwhile, all the broadband special offers I've been getting will end before the currently-annouced FTTC. start date in these parts. They don't seem to be doing much about IPv6 either. Engineering, I think, is too low a priority.

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E-cigarettes fingered as source of NASTY VIRUS

Dave Bell
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Re: Use a "USB Condom".

I have a battery "power-pack" I picked up at Lidl in the summer. Built-in solar cell, as will as a mini-USB input for charging, What is maybe relevant for this is that the output is a standard 2-contact power connection with an adaptor to standard micro-USB. It could still send a virus to a computer that was charging it, but anything you use it to charge would be safe.

It is possible to make your own "safe" lead, but I am not so confident with a soldering iron these days. The no-data leads are sometimes labelled as "fast charge".

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Amazon DROPS next day delivery amid Cyber Monday MADNESS

Dave Bell
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This looks more like the usual delivery sluggishness for the time of year—post early for Christmas and all that—than anything to do with Black Friday.

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Star Wars: Episode VII trailer lands. You call that a lightsaber? THIS is a lightsaber

Dave Bell
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Re: Lego?

The Lego version is the future of movie special effects.

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Eat FATTY FOODS to stay THIN. They might even help your heart

Dave Bell
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Learn the one weird trick for losing weight!

Eat less.

There are, incidentally, a lot of ways of making food more interesting which don't depend on sugars and fats.

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Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery

Dave Bell
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About the only thing available now which can handle these huge amounts of storage is the USB stick. It needs a very specific extension to the SD card interface to get past 32GB. An external SSD could use something such as Ethernet to connect, and I have a small box-thing which can connect an SD card via wifi or Ethernet.

I can remember USB expansion cards which used a PCI slot, had the usual row of sockets accessible from the back of the computer, and had a single purely internal USB socket. It may have been meant for one of those connector boxes that occuply the space used by a floppy drive, though these now use a different internal physical connector. not compatible with an unadorned USB stick,

If I had a couple of 64GB USB sticks in a RAID configuration, already possible, that aren't dangling in open air, that might be interesting. Move that approach to the TB scale. But I have seen similar multi-card RAID using SDHC, and I wonder if they can get the reliability.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Masala omelette

Dave Bell
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It's an error to think that a high Scoville number is a reliable signifier of a good curry.

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Dave Bell
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Re: ruined at the last moment by adding coriander leaves

The genetic factor was reported in Nature a couple of years ago. It's also known as Cilantro.

The article also reports a suggested fix from Harold McGee.

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Jacking up firearms fees will cost SMEs £3.5 MILLION. Thanks, Plod

Dave Bell
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There seems to be a pattern here that goes far wider than just firearms. Whether it's the Police or the security services, whether it's somebody with a legally accounted-for gun and a mental defect, or a potential terrorist with a Facebook account who has already come to the attention of the authorities, the tip-offs and questions get ignored. Whether it happens in Dunblane or Woolwich, the internal failures are fixed by blaming the outsiders.

In my time I have seen Police officers being damn stupid around guns. The safety essentials are so incredibly simple that one can argue that every Police officer should be taught them. It's not an exotic skill not to point a gun at somebody, and not to put your finger on the trigger.

And it is rather depressing when an air pistol can be included in an official photograph of "firearms" surrendered in an amnesty, or when, amongst a mix of assorted guns and knives found in the possession of a terrorist, the pictures show a wood chisel or an ordinary hatchet.

Some of the silliness can come from taking public reports seriously—it wasn't far from here that Police firearms officers were called out to a Royal Artillery aid defence battery on exercise, because somebody saw a lurking mad with a gun—but there's a lot that seems to be directed at making the public more scared, exaggerating the threat. There have been newspaper and television reports on the illegal trade, the smuggled guns that criminals can buy and even rent, but there has been far more effort made to get rid of legal firearms.

In the end, it's all about finding an easy fix. Whether it make any difference is irrelevant.

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Britain's MPs ask Twitter, Facebook to keep Ts&Cs simple

Dave Bell
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Re: new T&Cs...

Those licencing terms are partly due to the way the internet works, and existing IP law was never written with the internet in mind. Everything we post over the internet is copied. Changing a piece of text from ASCII to Unicode is a modification of the original. So is using a different font to display it.

I am not holding my breath wating for the politicians to some up with some legal structure that reflects the practical needs of the the internet. Just getting this message in front of your eyes could involve 5 or 6 legally distinct entities copying and modifying my copyrighted material.

At least this T&C text tries to limit the blanket rights grab to what is necessary for the service to work. It doesn't do that good a job, but it tries.

At the end of the day, there are few lawyers who know how the technology works, and the chances are that none of them worked on those T&Cs. I do know a couple of specialised barristers who work on this sort of technical issue, and while in the English legal system a barrister isn't limited to court work, it's questionable whether in-house corporate legal teams are as competent as they pretend to their employers.

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It's BLOCK FRIDAY: Britain in GREED-crazed bargain bonanza mob frenzy riot MELTDOWN

Dave Bell
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The local Tesco, a relatively ordinary branch and not one of the 24-hour shops, had a small table on which were stacked "HD-ready" TVs with a 19-inch screen and a DVD player. Nobody seemed to be buying them.

Black Friday seems to depend on people who don't depend on public transport, which is entirely shut down around here overnight. Neither the staff not the customers can get to the stores without a car of their own. From my experience, this might be different in the bigger cities. There are night buses in London, but what other choices are there? I think the DLR and Underground could be closed.

So the whole idea seems to depend on their being people with more money than sense. And are there really going to be people able to do useful work after storming the Black Friday sales?

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That sub-$100 Android slab you got on Black Friday? RIDDLED with holes, say infosec bods

Dave Bell
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Re: On a separate rant

Never use version x.0 of anything, isn't that the rule?

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Japan pauses asteroid BOMBING raid – still no word from Bruce Willis?

Dave Bell
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Re: Thought the Japs were in a shitload of debt!

I think they built it from Hollywood funding for the movie.

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