* Posts by Dazed and Confused

1695 posts • joined 12 Sep 2007

It killed Safe Harbor. Will Europe's highest court now kill off hyperlinks?

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Take down all road signs...

> The better analogy is more like putting the photos in a cardboard box behind a bush on the public sidewalk in front of your house and hoping

Even that isn't good analogy, it is like putting a box full of photos in a public library that you run but just not putting them in the card index. They are there, they are on the selves if anyone happens to look but just not index, until now.

The legal bods need to come down fair and square on the idea that links are legal and that if there is ever any infringement it is the hosting website that is the one infringing.

Trying to stop web pages using links is like King Cnut wanting to keep his toes dry.

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Little warning: Deleting the wrong files may brick your Linux PC

Dazed and Confused
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@Jeff Lewis

This weakness must exist in all other OS's on this platform too. True Linux is making this information easily available and on other OS's you might need to dig further to find it. But that isn't the problem. The problem is that once the NVRAM has had the UEFI variables deleted the systems is bricked.

It isn't a case of just recovering the UEFI partition. The systems is bricked, you can't recover anything using any OS. You need a method of restoring the NVRAM but the system won't boot far enough to allow you to do this.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: This is a lot more serious than the article suggests

It sounds more like an implementation issue, or others would be reporting the same issue on other boxes.

It is certainly not a problem to have dual ROMs for EFI, actually the first EFI systems I came across didn't. The ones that were flown over to Europe to training the HW engineers when they were about to be first released were in the middle of a FW upgrade when the training centre had a total power outage. All but one of the boxes was in the middle of a reload and was bricked.

The production versions of the machines had dual FW.

There are a number of possible problems here though. Is it like deleting a file with a mirrored disk? It's deleted both copies?

Is it that the ROM image thinks it's fine so hasn't triggered a switch to the backup ROM?

Is it the case that it can't get far enough into the boot sequence to realise that it needs to switch to the backup copy.

Or is it that it switches to the backup copy which can't boot this config either because its the data that's toast not the actual FW image in ROM.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Wanted - Motherboard no UEFI

Not sure about UEFI, but I used EFI for donkeys years, it has lots of nice things about it. BIOS was dreamt up in about 1872 and had been kludged around a lot since then. EFI was an attempt to come up with an sensible approach to being able to add new things into your firmware when you add new things into your HW.

This problem is down to a dumb implementation of UEFI, I don't know, it could be that other implementations are equally dumb.

Lots of things can be controlled by variables in EFI, variables can be created and changed as deleted. The stupid thing is that you can remove variables and that will stop it from being able to boot at least as far as some EFI interface.

I used to use EFI on Itanium boxes, and there it booted and took you into a nice Boot manager menu where you could set up all the boot options you liked, and it would normally also give you an option to access the EFI shell too, which was a bit like DOS. When the last generation Itanium systems switched to UEFI that nice boot manager seemed to disappear to make it look like a PC just booting what it was always going to boot and you had to do BIOS like things to get any interaction.

If I could have that boot manager menu and shell approach I'd chose UEFI over BIOS every day of the week.

BIOS must also have lots of internal variables. It is quite likely that combinations of these could brick a system too. I know one of my BIOS based boxes recently decided that it no longer wanted to boot from disk or from the network, even though the boot order options were set to boot from disk as the first choice. I ended up having to boot from a USB stick and re write the FW to the system.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: This is like BIOS flashing by Unix commands

> A virtual file linking to firmware settings

> A dangerous file system delete that I can think of no use for other than fun

Well apart from being able to set things like your boot paths and all of the other setting that can traditionally be set from FW.

Using the boot device as an example, if you install an OS, any OS, onto a BIOS based system there is no generic way to know where BIOS is going to want to boot from. If it's a simple PC then it's easy to guess. If its a more complex server then perhaps this is a bit more of a problem since there might be several possible disks. Take an HP ProLiant as an example. The default BIOS boot selection order is CD, Floopy, USB (includes SD-Card), Disk & finally Network (which is frankly insane, but that's the default).

But when it comes to disks there could be the internal SmartArray & external arrays which are perhaps connected via FC.

So when you do an install you can chose whether to write the OS to the internal SmartArray, the internal SD-Card or the external multipathed FC array. If you're installing RHEL6.X (*)it is relatively easy to choose which disk will be your root disk and where you want to write the boot loader. RHEL6 then does a pretty good job of guessing (but it is guessing) on the BIOS drive order, but you have an option to specify which order it should assume they'll be in. Then comes the problem. The install tends to want to format the SD-Card, so BIOS then tries to boot from there, even though you've just installed onto the disk. So after the install you get a boot failure. Now this is easy enough to fix from either the iLO or the RBSU, but it needs to be fixed.

If all these types of FW setting were accessible under /sys then it would be easy for the install to a) set the FW to boot from your chosen boot device & b) set the device mappings for the boot loader to match what the FW was doing.

(*) RHEL6 seems easy here, with some versions of Debian I've found the need to break out to the shell and manually install GrUB on the right disk, some versions of Ubuntu I've found I've had to pull the SD-Card out before doing the install and with SLES11.3 I'm yet to find a way to configure multipathing during the install and not have it install the boot loader on one of the MP FC disks even if you write the OS to the internal array. I've no idea what other OS's such as Windows might do under these circumstances.

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Ofcom's head is dead against Three and O2's merger

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Already gone...

> There's an unlimited data plan for £20/month on their website at the moment. That seems pretty cheap.

18months ago you could get that 200mins & unlimited data 1 month rolling contract for £12.9? a month when I signed up eldest son, last year in bumped up and then up, I think it we put the youngest one on it at £18/month but a 1 year contract.

We've got 3 of these contracts now and haven't (yet) heard from 3 about canning them. I did get a text from them today saying that they now have an addon for using your phone as a hotspot, which we've never done. The contract allowed for 4GB/month as a hotspot and unlimited for the phone itself. Number 2 son says he routinely pulls about 130GB/month these days!

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Reg readers battle to claim 'my silicon's older than yours' crown

Dazed and Confused
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I've got

An HP85 from 1980 which still works fine. I'm told the printers and tape drive can give problems but the rest of it is likely to still be working when the Sun goes nova on us.

I've also got the Casio 502P I bought in 1978 to do my A-Levels, does that count?

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Pubs good for the soul: Official

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Save the pubs! Fix the beer!

> I've had Bass, Guiness, Harp, etc. They are all unenjoyable.

Hmmm

Has anyone sold Harp on this side of the puddle since 1977? I hope not!

The Bass I've had in the US has absolutely nothing to do with the Bass over here where it's a very nice real ale. Mind even if they did sell the real stuff in the US it would almost certainly be served at the wrong temperature. I used to frequent a pub in Cupertino across the road from what is now I guess Apple but didn't used to be. They used to sell Fuller's beers but ice cold. It was like drinking warm white wine or ice cold red wine or port (the real reason the English have been at war with France since our ancestors dug out the channel is because those damn foreigners drink port from the fridge!). It just doesn't work. I always used to have to order 2 pints at the start of the evening. That way while you suffered the first one, the second one had time to come up to temperature. It still doesn't taste quite right but it helps.

Guinness? well that depends on what sort.It's an acquired taste. Then again there is Guinness and there is Guinness it depends on what you were brought up on. Me I grew up near Park Royal so that's the taste I acquired. Not that I mind the stuff they sell in Dublin :-)

I seem to remember that Samuel Adams does quite a passable Stout.

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Dazed and Confused
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> I am currently suffering from serious mental pain at the terrible dilemma this has forced me to consider. Which would I prefer to live without, tea or booze? The mental cruelty of the quesiton

I'm very sorry

I truly am

I feel your pain

I too couldn't chose between tea and booze

In my defence I can only say that I've not had any booze yet today so can't be expected to get my spelling nor my grammar right.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Willie Nelson

As a TV doctor once famously said

"The definition of an alcoholic is someone who drinks more than their doctor"

There are very few alcoholics in the country

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: giving head

Giving beer a head is a cultural thing.

At the risk of being prejudice in England it tends to be a North / South divide topic.

Larger usually has a head and is usually fizzy. In Holland it is (or was) a legal requirement for a glass of beer (larger) to have 2 fingers worth of froth on the top. So barmen with fat fingers are popular with publicans because that means there will be less beer in the glass. The 2 fingers are counted as being part of the legal measure.

With most real ales there is no fizz and so the head is largely made in the nozzle of the pump (beer engine). A barman can usually choose whether to put a head on the pint or not, it's in the wrist action. When I used to work behind the bar at a rugby club, for customers I didn't know I'd put a head on the beer if they had a northern accent and pour them flat if they didn't. Visitors were often intrigued by this and you'd get customers asking you to to pour out successions of pints alternately with and without the head without changing anything on the pump.

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Dazed and Confused
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THIS MUST BE WRONG

THIS MUST BE BANNED

WE ALL KNOW THAT THERE IS NO SAFE AMOUNT OF ALCOHOL

and alcohol free beer isn't ever going to make anyone happy.

Only miserable tea-totallers are entitled to be happy

Our government has spoken

(But please continue to buy booze coz we can't afford to lose the tax revenue)

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Google UK coughs up £130m back taxes. Is it enough?

Dazed and Confused
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Re: it is deficiencies in the tax laws

The problem with it being a deficiency in the tax laws is that makes it the government and the MPs fault and they can't admit to this.

The international tax system is simply no longer fit for purpose.

Now if I work in India I have to pay an Indian withholding tax. That is I have to pay Indian tax on the work I do there, they will then give me a certificate that says I've paid this tax and I can then claim this back against any tax the UK authorities might want to charge me on the same piece of work. If Indian tax is higher than UK tax, I lose out.

Now this strikes me a much more sensible way to work in an international environment. If Google (and all the others, it ain't just Google) had to pay UK corporation tax on work done in the UK and were then given a certificate to hand to the Irish authorities that says they've already coughed up this much. Then the UK would get the tax due on the UK bit of business. So instead of paying the lower rate of tax between the 2 countries, they have to pay the higher one.

Of course there are still a million and 1 tricks played by accountants.

So for example Starbucks claim that Starbucks UK makes no profit on any coffee sold in the UK because for every £1 worth of coffee they sell they have to pay £1.01 to Starbucks Logo Inc of some tax haven somewhere. This sort of thing is just pure bollocks and should be outlawed. Money spent of real R&D should be recoverable or there will be no new products, but money spent on other spurious bits of IP shouldn't.

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How to help a user who can't find the Start button or the keyboard?

Dazed and Confused
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Can't find the keyboard

I used to support HP-UX back in the late 80s. A lot of our customers used their systems to run CAD packages, typically HP's own one. Most of these people had their workstations configured to boot straight into the CAD package and so never used the keyboard.

It was typical to get a call where you'd ask the customer to type something and there'd be this awkward silence.

Me: Do you know where the keyboard is

Customer: Errr I think it's around the back somewhere

Me: OK can you go and have a look for it.

Pause: followed by a few banging sounds, some muttering, the occasional swear word then the sound of the phone being picked up.

Customer: OK got it, now what was it you wanted me to type?

...

Eventually you'd get them to having a terminal window

...

Me: Lets start by find out where you are on the system, please type p w d

Awkward silence

Me: OK you'll find the "p" key on the top row of letters at the right hand end

Customer: Errr

KER CHUNK!

Me: Now you'll find the "w" key towards the left hand side, but still on the top row of letters

KER CHUNK!

and so on

Talking them through a "vi" session was so much fun.

Of course keyboards were do much tougher back then, the modern ones would probably have cracked in two halfway though the first command.

Can't really blame most of the customers, they'd bought a fancy new drawing board as far as they were concerned. Things like keyboards were just a distraction.

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2015's horror PC market dropped nine per cent

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Windows 10's arrival in business should help sales to pick up

It's the arrival of Windows 10 which is killing off the PC business.

Users got their hand burnt so badly by the s*&t which is W8.* and they are scared stiff that the forced on us virus ware that is W10 is going to just make things worse they are no longer interested in PCs.

Thanks MS, you just screwed the whole business!

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Nvidia GPUs give smut viewed incognito a second coming

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Video driver clearing memory

This should be a C2 security failure, reusable resources should be cleaned before reuse.

Imaging if the GPU was doing the whole video session, it could have the credentials including passwords etc in it's memory, these could then be picked out by another app on the same box.

This is a major security snafu.

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If you want a USB thumb drive wiped, try asking an arts student for help

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Sod thumbdrives

And there was me hoping for the noise of a good old fashioned head crash.

Please explain in 100 words or less why exactly you expected this to happen.

Coz manufactures go on and on about how the disk heads need perfect conditions to keep flying just above the surface of the disk and why we used to have to go to such care back when hard disk packs used to be removable and all the bollocks we were fed when removable packs were phased out in favour of sealed for life units.

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Dazed and Confused
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Sod thumbdrives

I was retiring good old fashioned hard disks the other day. I was very disappointed to find that when you peel off the label that covers the "inspection hatch" while they were running there was no satisfying noise of total destruction, just a lot of wind noise, and the buggers just kept on working fine till I stuffed something into the hole.

And there was me hoping for the noise of a good old fashioned head crash.

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Foetuses offered vaginal music streaming service

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Hmm...

Some time after he was born, we received a baby gift of "relaxing womb sounds." The normally placid little chap reacted with considerable distress when the disc started to play, and settled only when it stopped.

When MrsConfused was expecting our first little one there was a load of publicity about playing music to your unborn children so she thought we'd have a go. A pair of head phones pressed gently to her tummy (just like your picture) and some soothing Beethoven. Well this resulted instantly in some serious kicking.

Experiment not repeated.

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Microsoft steps up Windows 10 nagging

Dazed and Confused
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Re: I'm waiting until it goes to 11.

" any computer you don't assemble yourself is going to come with a valid Windows license"

I bought a Laptop from HP earlier this year which was shipped install with Ubuntu. It was at a significant cost saving compared with buying the same model with Windows. About 10% IIRC.

It's low spec, but perfect for what I wanted, mostly to run Thunderbird and access my email while inside the house without lugging my main laptop in.

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Vote now to name HPE's London boozer

Dazed and Confused
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The beer bust ?

and hopefully not the gone bust

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Who needs CCTV? Get a terrifying slowpoke hoverdrone cam

Dazed and Confused
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Re: 10kmph isn't that slow.

> I don't know any other drones that can do ten thousand miles per hour.

No, but all the black helicopters go at least that fast.

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New gear needed to capture net connection records, say ISPs

Dazed and Confused
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Re: How exactly does this work

When I visit www.theregister.co.uk, this isn't one transaction.

Of course most of the websites you actually visit you have no knowledge of.

So if you wanted to stitch someone up you could easily set up a page such than when they visited your legit page you sent them off to all sorts of dodgy sites just for fun.

So the powers that be at El'Reg could decide to detect any connections from IP addresses associated with the Houses of Parliament and then send them "doctored" pages which resulted in the visitor also visiting www.howtomakeanuke.isis.com and www.kiddy****.pron

If the tracking system isn't saving the whole page downloaded from El'Reg then the poor visitor wouldn't have any defence when the BiB come knocking on their door for visiting illegal sites. All that would show up in their logs is that you're a pedo nuclear terrorist with non Christian leanings. So you're well and truly F*&^ed.

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HMRC aims for fully digital tax system by 2020. Yeah, whatever

Dazed and Confused
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Do they mean digital or do they mean binary?

IE some people pay tax and some people don't

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Rounded corners on Android phones cost Samsung $548m: It will pay up to Apple after all

Dazed and Confused
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In the mean time

Samsung will just add $650M to the cost of all the components Apple buys off them, like they did last time.

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Facebook to Belgian data cops: Block all the cookies across the web, then!

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Eh

hasn't someone written a tool that constantly stuffs random data into the cookie to keep FB confused?

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Investigatory Powers Tribunal scraps its first annual report

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Just how hard is it to publish 300 pages of black box redacted text?

It turns out it isn't only 300 pages, that was just the intro. The full report (redacted) runs to over 300 reams, and they can't find enough toner cartridges to black box that lot.

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Apple's design 'drives up support costs, makes gadgets harder to use'

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Good points

As I keep telling students "If you need lessons on using a GUI then there is something fundamentally wrong and who ever wrote the GUI needs lessons on writing them"

The whole point is that they should be intuitive.

Now everyone writing them seems to think that the whole point of a GUI is to out weird the other guys writing them.

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No, the EU is not going to make hyperlinks illegal

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Diddums

Would this for example screw comparison sites which aggregate lots of different peoples websites to tell you who is offering the cheapest deal on ... well just about everything. I bet that say the electricity supply companies would love to stop sites listing all their pricing in 1 place when they've been paying marketing zeebs structure their site so that no one is able to find the cheap deals that they've promised of*** really do exist.

Surely if websites don't want you to link to their pages without going through their preordained path they can just use dynamic links and not allow referrals from Google go where customers actually want to go, and send them to the marketing spiel page first.

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US Congress grants leftpondians the right to own asteroid booty

Dazed and Confused
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Re: "SPACE Act of 2015"

On the other hand it's probably only by telling business that they can make money out there that anyone is really going to make the effort to haul arse of this bloody lump of rock. Waiting for Gubberment agencies to do it again doesn't seem to be working.

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So. Farewell then Betamax. We always liked you better than VHS anyway

Dazed and Confused
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Re: @Mike 16 Can we finally settle this?

Didn't the porn industry favour video/laser disk, the porn industry always knew that with a "recordable" format there would be a massive piracy problem and that in the case of porn the quality of the rip offs wouldn't deter the punters.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Sony's BRAIN DEAD Entertainment division

All these technologies were developed by Sony before they bought the entertainments business. They'd also developed a CD writer. But to avoid the Betamax problem happening again they bought themselves into the content market, that way the could ensure that their format was used. But all these great technologies they'd developed then became an embarrassment. The planned price of the blank CDs went from about £1 each to more the cost of any CBS pre-recorded CD, so that is wasn't sensible to pirate your CDs.

In the end it didn't help. The next format they were trying to protect was HDTV, Sony's proposed standard was 1920x1200, but instead the crappy 1920x1080 format won out. I used their HDTV monitors on a Unix workstation in around 1990, 1920x1200 and 40" :-) gorgeous.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Can we finally settle this?

Years ago I had a student on several course who worked for a company that made the pre-recorded tapes for lots of the big studios, he described the setup as having a Betamax master unit in the top of each rack connected to a farm of VHS recorders. I commented that I was surprised they didn't use U-matic or V2000 for the master, but he said that the Betamax tapes were sufficiently better than VHS that you couldn't tell the difference, which was all the matter for the manufacturing process.

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What the Investigatory Powers Bill will mean for your internet use

Dazed and Confused
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Can my ISP determine which of us at home is accessing a certain site?

You say NO,

But this could be "perhaps"

I've got Internet connections from A&A and from BT. The A&A connection uses a mix of static and NAT based addresses, the static ones are obviously easily traceable whois will do it for you, but the NAT based ones on this link would be hidden from the ISP since the DHCP and the NAT is being done by my local Linux boxes.

For the BT the BT supplied router knows which devices are been allocated which internal IP addresses and could be logging the translations, so I don't know whether they could map the sites visited back to the individual gadgets used within the house. I have also seen my phone connected the generic BT WiFi at home rather than the local WiFi, so they could be logging things that way.

For my Linux managed NAT I can it I have to map the NAT'd connections back to the local device, so there is no reason to believe that BT Internet can't do that too, if the guys in the black helicopters ask nicely.

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Facebook brings creepy ’Minority Report’-style ads one step closer

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Never mind Facebook...

Of course with the new Govbook app you can't uninstall it, you can't even escape by leaving your phone at home. With their network of CCTV cameras they know where you've been, they know ...

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Dazed and Confused
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You mean it's like when you walk down dark side streets in the certain parts of town and men in dirty macs stand there call out "Girls, Girls, nice Girls, I've got nice Girls just for you Sir..." Only they also know your name and your address and can see who your wife, mother and boss are too.

Creepy!

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Advertise as much as you like you pricks

> Cos I buy all my running clothes from TK Maxx.

I remember years ago listening to a program on R4 about advertising and Real Ale and how the advertisers were finding it difficult. Then they interviewed someone from one of the big marketing firms who admitted that they'd spent so long and so much money advertising Larger that everyone who was susceptible to advertising was already a larger drinker while it seemed that everyone who drank real ale consciously disregard any form of advertising. Which made their (the advertisers) life difficult.

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Linus Torvalds targeted by honeytraps, claims Eric S. Raymond

Dazed and Confused
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Facepalm

Re: Celibacy and internet porn is the only sensible path for today.

a) Celibacy

How's that going to protect you from false accusations?

b) Internet porn

Ms. May has the goods on you, you're going to see your perfectly legal life go up in flames when they publish the list of sites you've visit. You haven't broken the law of the land, but you've broken the unwritten on. Your life is at an end

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Biggest problem with virtual reality: It can be a little too real for people

Dazed and Confused
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But didn't

people make exactly the same comment about moving pictures when they first appeared?

Now everyone is used to them.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux lands on Microsoft Azure cloud – no, we're not pulling your leg

Dazed and Confused
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Re: MS did not buy Red Hat, they did not absorb them...

Maybe not, but the thing about viruses is that they're generally contagious

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Linus Torvalds fires off angry 'compiler-masturbation' rant

Dazed and Confused
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Re: The FORTRAN FEMA trailer has stopped nearby....

C, FORTRAN, pahhhh who cares, a good FORTRAN programmer can write FORTRAN in any language.

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Top cops demand access to the UK's entire web browsing history

Dazed and Confused
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> Turns out the correct analogy for what you are asking for is "we want to put a surveillance team outside everyone's houses, forever..."

Not just outside their house, but to then tail them and record everywhere they go and everyone they communicate with. Not only that but everyone they meet must hold up a sign about what the meeting was for.

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'Govt will not pass laws to ban encryption' – Baroness Shields

Dazed and Confused
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Re: It's like

> If a politician says something and no one hears him, is he still lying?

Oh goodie, and easy question

YES

of course they are still lying.

You can tell when they stop lying, start to go a sort of bluey-grey colour within about 1 minute.

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Lawyers harrumph at TalkTalk's 'no obligation to encrypt' blurt

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Flame

Broken by design

> Encryption is completely useless against a straightforward extract using the correct credentials.

The simple fact of the matter is that the front end web servers shouldn't have unrestricted access to sensitive customer data. It should not be possible to issue a query from those systems that can retrieve full credit card and bank account details. Sure it makes life bloody easy for the website developers to be able to issue a simple SQL query to the back end and pull out the data, but so long as that is possible then these breaches will happen. Only by stopping the data being there to be hacked are you going to stop it being hacked. In the case of the card number the most that the web server should be able to see would be a bolloxed version with the middle full of stars.

Like the way that password are handled, the system doesn't store the plain text password, it stores a hash. When the user logs in then you hash what they type and compare the resulting garbage. In the case of the card numbers the user should say which card they want to use and then either the list id number (she chose card 3) or the full card should be sent to the back end system to do the financial transaction. There should be no unrestricted access from the webserver to the backend box. There should be no other access to the backend box from the any of the public facing machines.

If it was possible to get access to the banking/credit details from the webserver then the whole management team should be doing time and the there should be massive fines plus liability to customers who lose out. Only by sticking the boot in like this will companies start to take security seriously.

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Bacon can kill: Official

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Risk assessment...

> Given the additives, preservatives, mould inhibitors, ...

My local little piggy farm sell their own bacon in their own baps.

Sadly the forum here doesn't allow me to post pictures of pork porn

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Dazed and Confused
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Happy

> And yet despite all of this, I still haven't seen the headlines telling me that vegetarians live forever.

That's because vegetables cause cancer, just ask any teenager

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Why single out bacon?

> a quick Google reveals there does seem to be a link between high salt intake and these types of cancer:

Great, can we have salt added to the list of known carcinogens too then.

Then can we see how long people live when they decide to avoid it.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Risk assessment...

> That's 18% of about 4.5% or your chances of getting colorectal cancer goes from 4.5% to 5.3%, which doesn't sound so scary.

But only if you eat it everyday!

Prof Tim Key, from the Cancer Research UK and the University of Oxford, said:

"Eating a bacon bap every once in a while isn't going to do much harm - having a healthy diet is all about moderation."

The problem with the "everything in moderation" message is

a) it doesn't make for good headlines, so won't sell any newspapers

b) is hard to turn into a product that someone in the food industry and sell.

So there is no money in it.

As a side note, given that El'Reg is the unofficial website of we, the bacon sarnie eating majority, why isn't there an icon for a bacon buttie? So I've used beer instead.

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Let's talk about that NSA Diffie-Hellman crack

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Re. Primed

> At the risk of being pedantic, that's not actually true...

You are of course correct Vic, and not just for "tells" traffic analysis also makes massive use of signals that you can't read. These were lessons that Bletchley taught the military and the powers that be got all snotty with Gordon Welchman when he told the world.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Re. Primed

As sometime above signs off their posting "...for now"

This is always the guiding principle when it comes to encryption.

The military only needed encryption to be good enough that the information was no longer of strategic value by the time it was decrypted. A signal that tells an artillery battery to open fire in 5 minutes is fine to send out on a code system which can be broken in 6 minutes time.

But these things need to constantly reviewed, once the enemy can crack the code in sub 5mins you need to be prepared to upgrade your system.

This seems to be where so many crypto systems break down. People expect their encryption tech to last, well they won't. WPA2 is now over 10 years old, how many "Moores cycles" does that give us?

Any encryption system based on mathematical tricks should come with a maximum life time and mandatory reviews. Moores law talked about 18 months, so don't expect to go any longer than that before seriously reviewing things.

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