* Posts by Mikey

129 posts • joined 7 Sep 2007

Page:

Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Mikey

@Flocke

Mostly they'll be from those who are firmly entrenched in the horrible mind-set of 'Anything Microsoft does is evil'. These are the same kind of people who are akin to those whose religious views are the be-all and end-all of everything, and nothing to the contrary can persuade them otherwise, no sir-ee.

I figure they're less pro FOSS, and just more for hating on a common target to feel like they're doing something useful. New Age Feminists and SJWs are waaaay behind, these guys have been doing it for decades!

10
13
Mikey

Just another good example...

...Of how those in the Linux community want everyone to join in and contribute to their preferred operating system... except maybe them over there, we don't want them playing with it. And those over in that corner too, we'd rather not let them in. And anyone else that doesn't fit in with the preferred image of what a contributor looks like... What DOES one look like, anyhow?

This, my friends, is the flipside to open source, namely that anyone can contribute. ANYONE. Wasn't that one of the much flaunted points about the whole deal? And if a big company wants to throw its own, apparently totally reviewable code, into the ring as well... then why not? Isn't this where all those eyeballs reviewing the code (another much shouted about benefit to the whole FOSS thing) should pick up any nasties, and throw them out at that stage? Or will it be very few who bother to look, finding it far easier to just decry the whole things as evil and manipulative?

It's entirely possible that this could end up being a wonky attempt to take over an existing product, but I would warn against believing that to be the only reason for this. After all, it's not unknown for companies and people to change, even if it's usually glacial in speed. But I fear it's just a knee-jerk reaction to the fact that the main pet target for most of the ranty zealot types is now looking a bit more sympathetic towards the idea of Linux in general, and that irks them.

But then, how many movies and TV programs have had a supposed bad guy turn good at the last minute? It happens, people. At least respect the effort, even if you don't respect the entity.

(Cue down votes with no explanation. Or, if you're feeling charitable, provide a solid reason as to why you don't believe this might actually be a good thing!)

16
13

ISS pump-up space podule fully engorged

Mikey

The important thing we need to know is...

...when struck by something sizable like a decent micro-meteor or bits of exploded Chinese satellite, does it compress comically, accompanied by the sound of someone squeezing an accordion hard?

And with that in mind, if we used these to connect various lengths of station together, especially the habitation sections... we could create the space-going equivalent of a bendy bus!

2
0

Seagate ready for the HAMR blow: First drives out in 2017

Mikey

If I had the money to invest, I'd ensure it was invested in a disk company that also makes flash storage, because diversification is a smart move. Just like having said disk to back up that oh-so-precious chippery that is one controller failure away from total loss. Eggs and basket scenario, you see.

And yes, if I had the cash to do so, why not? I'd look for the right company that is also looking ahead, trying new technologies and seeing if they can squeeze yet more life out of existing tech so we can have greater capacities for less money. Give people the space, they'll use it. Drives break, people upgrade, disks get sold still. If the market is there, then you'd be daft not to cater for it.

0
0
Mikey

Yes, because absolutely no-one wants or needs bulk data storage on cheap, easily replaceable media with the ability to recover the data on a duff unit using well proven methods. And certainly no-one needs this because this cloud thing isn't happening. And heavens forbid anyone has less than the budget to afford a stupidly fast and expensive bit of flash storage. I mean, all those people who just surf the net, read emails and look at cat pics and porn will be SO hampered using a mere spinny platter unit.

Or... you're just looking at it the wrong way. Maybe your phrase should have been "Why are they still making heavy goods vehicles when people are buying more and more cars?"

0
0
Mikey

Ok, let's have a look...

1) Because it has absolutely nothing to do with software, modems or the era of mass dialup. So the only people who may get confused are those still refusing to move to broadband and have something of a fetish for the painfully slow data rates.

2) Because the tech industry NEVER reuses acronyms, ever. Did you have a go at Nvidia when they reused the term SLI from the olden days of the 3Dfx Voodoo 2? Because I think a few people got confused, then shrugged and went back to knowing the difference (Because it only took 10 seconds of reading to find out).

3) Because in this case, it actually works with the terminology. What else would you call it?

4) Because apparently you get easily confused over things like not letting go of the ? key after one character, so I guess you're allowed to be at this point.

5) Because I like lists.

1
0

Microsoft half-bricks Asus Windows 7 PCs with UEFI boot glitch

Mikey

Re: and after disabling UEFI...

Or... just carry on using Win 7 like before. That's the easiest option, I would say. No formatting, faffing with other software, drivers, patches, troubleshooting when your already present OS works fine.

Occams razor, and all that.

24
2

Hold on a sec. When did HDDs get SSD-style workload rate limits?

Mikey

S.M.A.R.T.

Sometimes May Actually Report Truthfully....

Some Marketing Arse Requested This...

Selective Metric Analysis Reduces Tolerance...

System Makes All Reliability Transient

2
0

Nanoparticle boffinry could boost battery life

Mikey

Re: "faster charging and greater energy storage"

'Life' without a little bit of risk is called working for the HSE, if it can indeed be called a life...

6
0

Toshiba notebook disk drive slims down. You like that, gamers?

Mikey

Re: I fail to see the point

Other than being over twice the price for less space, the SSD does have one issue that your standard spinning rust doesn't have. Namely, if the electronics fail on the HDD, the platters are still readable and recoverable, even down to the point of doing a simple board swap rather than sending it to recovery experts. The SSD however, if the controller on that goes bang... you have a lot of NAND chips sitting there with bits and bytes on them that are rather useless without the associated controller to know where everything is, thus necessitating a rather expensive trip to said experts. And given I've heard more SSDs going wonky recently than standard traditional drives, that could very well be a deal breaker for some people.

Of course, this drive would make an excellent mirror for your expensive SSD, wouldn't it? And for less than half the price too! Bargain!

6
2

NASA injects cash into solar electric motor

Mikey

Re: I'm begining to suspect something is going on....

From my perusals on the pedia that is wiki, the main reason for using xenon is that it doesn't corrode and knacker your equipment in the same way that the old mercury ions used to.

4
0

You won't believe this, but… nothing useful found on Farook iPhone

Mikey

Re: On the "stupiidity" of people

I would really, REALLY love to know where this was going, but it seems to have wandered off the path of rationality and into the soggy ditch of incoherence. What I THINK you seem to be saying, is that we like being in an ordered system, regardless of how badly it's being run. And that those who are good at leading will end up leading. That certainly didn't need a massive wall of unformatted test to say, however. Even amanfromars1 has a better grasp of paragraphs.

And after all that, what on earth has said comment got to do with the subject at hand? This is an article on how nothing important was found on a phone most guessed was useless, not a diatribe on the intricacies of human biology and social development.

You could have just said the FBI has idiots in charge, would have been MUCH easier to read and agree with!

3
1

Microsoft lures top Linux exec from Oracle to Redmond

Mikey

Re: Oh dear...

Krypt, you're doing the same as John has, you've focused on things that are utterly insignificant to the end user. Code quality matters to those who write it, debug it, and document it. Not to those who never see it, or understand it, or care about it. If it works, and works well enough, that's all that really matters to the majority of users. So again, from a technical standpoint you're correct in the need for quality, but it's just not important if you're not a coder.

"Linux users know how to build tools..." - What, ALL of them? I can pretty much disprove that immediately, with something that'll shock you. I run Maemo on an N900, and I wouldn't have the first clue how to do that, much less need to. All the apps I need? I just (wait for it!) download and install, and wouldn't you know it, some are just plain crap. There are many apps and widgets in the various repositories, and about half to three quarters are just variations on the same things. A couple of media players, some hackneyed open source games with names that aren't quite the same as the proper version but invariably persist on keeping the ill-fitting 'open' part of the title, a few custom apps that will be of bugger all use to anyone other than the author and 3 mildly insane people (List of bell towers, anyone? Or an app to measure the correct steeping time for tea?).

It goes without saying, just because you CAN build apps and tools, doesn't mean they're going to be good, useful or necessary.

"The world is running more instances of Linux than anything else" - I'm not going to argue that, but I WILL point out that the vast majority of those will again never be seen by those who use the services of which they provide. All people want is the easy to use UI, or the web pages that server provides, or whatever service is provided. If the server kept popping up little notifications every now and then to say 'Hey! You're using something powered by Linux!', then relatively few will understand what that meant, and even fewer would actually care. It's on OS, it's not the universal panacea for all of mankind's ills and shortcomings that some seem to portray it as.

As for being naively optimistic, I'm sorry to burst your little zealot bubble, but I'm not pro-Microsoft. Sure, I use their stuff, but I'm not out there preaching all the benefits of anything they sell. Hell, I'm usually warning people against upgrading to a new version of Windows until it's been out for a while, and we can see what needs some attention to rectify whatever shortcomings and cockups there happen to be. I would wager that kind of thing even happens in the Linux world, although precious few would admit that. So reign in the vitriol and just be thankful you have a choice of what you'd like to use, and maybe let others have that same choice as well, even if it's not the one you'd prefer.

4
3
Mikey

Oh dear,Johnny... you're looking at things from a very black-and-white viewpoint. And, most likely, from the usual technical standpoint of someone who is well versed in the intricate inner workings of software, most likely. That's not a bad thing, sure. But then, realise there are many, many more who haven't the slightest clue how the box of internets and email actually works, and those are the people who benefit from something familiar, something that can be found almost anywhere, something they understand.

No-one is 'bending' for anyone here. People will always go with what is familiar and comfortable for them, even if it's something that you personally dislike for whatever reason. Trying to get said people to change by ranting about how 'crap' something is largely unlikely to work, as most will (rightly or wrongly) dismiss you as a lunatic. However, if you were to sit down and actually show these people what you can offer them , instead of frothing rhetoric and sneered put-downs, they may actually listen and learn. However, you're currently being one of those people who used to put me right off the idea of using Linux due to the attitude you're presenting.

If you actually cared about the user, and not just about one-upping a large software company, you'd steer away from the ranty lunacy and try different tactics. That said, you're being said loony on a technical website were people already use what they like, so good luck with that, chum.

10
3
Mikey

Oh dear...

I'm baffled, even after all this time, why people insist on defining anything Microsoft makes as 'shit'. Given that it's what a lot of people will pick up and use first when learning how to operate a PC, and given how many use it daily for home and work, as well as some of their other better products (mice and keyboards, certainly), it's certainly far from shit. It may not be the best, but there is worse out there, and you cannot pretend that in some cases, FOSS stuff is actually worse.

There have been waves of good and bad from that company, just as there has been from any project, company or individual. To slate it all as shit is ignorant at best, and rabidly fanatical at worst. I suspect a lot of it stems from people still bitter about the Linux desktop market being much smaller than they'd like, when they forget that the server segment is much more impressive. Linux has it's place, but the desktop is still not it for the masses, for the time being.

If you can bring yourself to focus on the good from all sources, then you'll appreciate what there is out there, and at the same time you can truly decry the real dross, but again from all sources. I freely admit that I'm only slowly starting to get more into the FOSS world myself, but that's mainly because of the rabid and unfriendly fans that put me off for many years. Still, I ignore them now for the narrow-minded fools they are, and carry on with using the best of whatever I can find.

Maybe you should do so as well? One less unpleasant ranting zealot in the world is one step closer to getting people to use Linux, and isn't that what you'd want?

15
12

Who'd be mad enough to start a 'large-scale fire' in a spaceship?

Mikey

A little light Monday morning entertainment...

Twinkle twinkle, Little Pod,

All fired up now you've done your job!

Up above the world so high,

Oh bloody hell now it's ALL on fire!

Burning fiercely, Little Pod,

Oh balls, the transmitter isn't on...

15
0

Fail0verflow GitHubs PS4 Linux loader

Mikey

Re: I just... why?

Firefox just seemed so godawful slow compared to MicroB, and I'll be honest, I haven't tried Opera yet because I'd actually forgotten it existed. The standard browser would be fine if it was just updated to run HTML5 properly, to be honest.

0
0
Mikey

I just... why?

"A user who gets through all of this would end up either with a PS4 running Gentoo on the 4.4 kernel, or (more likely for most users) a bricked machine."

So, you go out, spend the money on a games console that can already do stuff like access the net, and then you either turn it into a malfunctioning lump, or put an OS on it that would have been more useful on a cheap, modularly upgradable PC that would cost the same amount or less. Other than bragging rights and epeen, I really and honestly fail to see what is to be gained by doing this. If it actually made it more useful, sure... but go back to the part about the PC being cheaper, upgradable etc.

Frankly, if you penguins are wanting to do something unusual, write a proper replacement browser for my N900 and its aging MicroB. Now THAT would be useful!

3
3

Microsoft joins Eclipse Foundation. Odd thing for a competitor to do

Mikey
Facepalm

Re: Oh. Woo. Yay.

And what koolaid would that be? You missed the point entirely there, chap. They're a company (Like say, Canonical) that make software (Like say, Ubuntu), and like any other company, choose to diversify their product line in (hopefully successful) various other flavours and formats (Like say, Ubuntu Phone... no, wait...)

I'm not promoting them, but neither am I denigrating them. I'm just stating why they'd do such a thing, and at the same time, point out that the rabid lunatics with a persecution complex will always assume the worst in anything they do.

(And yes, the hidden satire there is that their own offering of Windows Phone isn't exactly flying off the shelves either. Thought I'd point that out before those who aren't aware of irony jump in and get all smug...)

6
2
Mikey

Oh. Woo. Yay.

Eh, no surprise really. Microsoft is a software company, and they're branching into other areas of software. Yay. It's hardly unexpected, nor is it evil, monopolistic, nor unfair or wrong. Just a good business strategy of diversification like anyone else would.

Not that it'll stop the nutjobs claiming otherwise with nary a shred of proof of 'evil' intentions.

10
7

Sub-atomic boffins glimpse four-pack tetraquark

Mikey

Oh god, it's a sad day for humanity if indeed our most basic particles truly are bouncing around this universe with labels written in comic sans...

3
0

Linux lads lambast sorry state of Skype service

Mikey

Loving the irony

So what we have here, is a bunch of very vocal Linux users, most likely the very same who would be the first to denounce and decry any other form of Microsoft software, now crying out because the very software they would never go back to is unavailable, possibly because of the lack of people using it to begin with (due to the apparent mass migration to Linux, because Microsoft etc)?

And as for that wonderful tweet about "Microsoft making using Linux painful"... No, I'm pretty sure that the Linux coders have been making it painful for years long before anyone else took an interest. When techies write an OS for techies, it's going to be technical. It's only due to the recent efforts by those who could see the potential monetary value in making it more accessible to the majority of end users (Ubuntu springs readily to mind here) that ease-of-use has become a major factor.

Lastly, there are more than likely going to be dozens of FOSS projects revolving around making a better alternative to the 'Evil Proprietary Micro$haft EevilEvilBadBad' out there already. Just get the community to rally around the best one, polish it up, and present it as a cross-platform, highly usable and FREE alternative and voila. Another choice. I know, I know... it's harder to do that than complain, and it DOES involve trying to get many disparate coders to unify in one coherent and well-planned project, but IF that can be accomplished, wouldn't that be better for everyone as a whole?

Or else just use something like TeamSpeak, Mumble or Discord. Free, easy to use, cross platform, blah blah blah.

2
15

Nasuni sees cloud killing on-premises storage

Mikey

Hmmm... if the cloud is doing away with local storage... does that mean all the software and data for running the cloudy barn is actually stored elsewhere on someone else's cloud? Will there one day be the cloud infrastructure, but no actual hardware powering it all? THESE are the things which barely keep me awake during the day.

1
0

QLogic: Ready to get excited about an Ethernet adapter?

Mikey

Awesome!

Yeah, I can't wait to get a couple of these babies when the availability of 100Gbit internet connections become the norm! And, given the timeframe of THAT happening, I have plenty of time to actually save up for them too... assuming I live to see the year 3000...

3
0

Linux Mint hacked: Malware-infected ISOs linked from official site

Mikey
Happy

Re: The feel when the discussion reminds one of the Amiga vs. Atari ST days of retardation

Pffft, everyone knows the Amiga was the better of the two any day!

11
3
Mikey

"What's the betting the hacker's IP address is in a range owned by M$?"

Precisely sod all, one would imagine. Really, what would they have to gain from doing that, given the market share of PCs running mint is miniscule in the grand scheme of things? I know you unwashed lot love to portray them as evil-minded, underhanded ratbags with an over-riding mission to eliminate all things from St Torvalds himself, but that's completely batshit bonkers. Pretty much up there with chemtrails and all those free energy contraptions.

The simple fact here is there was a webserver set up by some halfwit who left it vulnerable, and it got compromised. It happens all the time, all over the place, and there is nothing to suggest that just because it happens to run the all-hallowed Linux that it's inherently immune to such things. I do worry about you lot, because sometimes it feels like you've been conditioned to trust FOSS implicitly without using the normal security and setup procedures. It's software, it can go bad on you, it's always a risk. No matter the vendor.

Macolytes and Linux Zealots have been taking the piss for years. Then the Macolytes felt the sharp sting of vulnerability, and now... now it's the turn of the Zealots. Maybe now you'll see we're all in the same boat?

11
7

Roll up, roll up to the Malware Museum! Run classic DOS viruses in your web browser

Mikey

Re: I suppose a lot of us would like to know...

@mikey - have a look in $Windows.~BT - you will find a nice winbloat file that is waiting for you to upgrade to w10 whether you want to or not.

You mean the one I got rid of as soon as I found it, and knew what it was for? Yes, I removed the cached data for the upgrade, no different to any other downloaded and as-yet-uninstalled update in principle. Sure, the delivery method was underhanded, but an update is all it ever was.

And now it's not. Good computer management, you see. Take steps to secure, remove, patch and protect.

1
0
Mikey
Facepalm

I suppose a lot of us would like to know...

...What exactly IS this 'winbloat' you're on about? Kinda sounds like some weird prank program, or maybe a Mr Creosote simulator. Whatever it is, I guess I hope it doesn't show up on my install of Win 7. Thankfully, that has some semblance of a firewall, and a semi-useful malware checker.

But no, you can't mean Windows. That DOES come with some security, even if the rest is up to the user to provide. And that's a good thing, I think, having the freedom of choice on that. Certainly choice seems to be a tennet of that peculiar kind of rabid open source lunatics, so choice MUST be a good thing!

Right?

26
10

Head transplant candidate sells souvenirs to fund operation

Mikey

Re: Body transplant

Because when you look at it, the brain is the command center for the body. If it works, then in theory it's like getting a different car (I hesitate to say new, as who knows what condition the next one will be in. If it's anything like mine, not even WeBuyAnyCorpse would give me a tenner for it...)

So yes, you're putting the control section on another body. Pretty sure the heart has no feelings either way when it comes to getting a new home and being alive again, but the noggin certainly does.

3
1

How a power blip briefly broke GitHub's boxes and tripped it offline

Mikey
Joke

Re: The bigger question is why they rebooted

The more likely reason when you realise what OS they run is that it's all obsolescent hardware running on the cheap, because you don't need top-of-the-line when running Linux, right?

All joking aside, I'm kinda surprised there was no backup power available, you'd think a datacentre would have that as a basic provision. At the very least have an in-rack UPS unit that would start a graceful shutdown in such an event. But then, hindsight is always late to the planning party is it not?

2
0

Little warning: Deleting the wrong files may brick your Linux PC

Mikey
Coat

Just an observation...

...but when you have a system that allows you total power over your machine, you should be too surprised when such consequences arise, expected or not. If you're going to wield such ability, you need to be prepared for the worst, no matter what system you use. Otherwise, you're shooting in the dark with no recourse to the inevitable ricochet.

See, I know this is a dangerous thing to post, I know I'm going to get downvotes, I fully expect that. I already have my coat on, and will be laughing all the way out :O)

0
0

Stanford boffins snuff out li-ion batt blaze risk

Mikey

A good article, and an interesting and simple technique to prevent the overheating. Hopefully someone smart will get this into production samples sooner rather than later.

But just one thing... why on earth are we STILL using those bloody fahrenheit things in articles? Honestly, while I appreciate we still have older folks who do still know them, given the fact they're on a tech site you'd think they'd be a little more savvy with the current universal standard.

Right, off to improve my mood with tea and a bacon sarnie.

3
0

Samsung spins up its latest rusty rotators for release

Mikey

Re: Backup

Larger drives mean you don't have to have so many in a machine, all drawing power and making heat and noise. So there is a point to it, and it makes sense. Plus, it's cheaper buying one large drive than many smaller ones, then buggering about with the RAID setup, and all that overhead.

As for the spindle speed, at that density you're looking at quite a lot of data passing under the head rather rapidly, so it makes less of an impact than you'd imagine. Coupled with a nice big buffer and plenty of read-ahead, even less again. And a slower spindle means less power used to get it to operational speed, so less draw on your battery. Win, game, set and match.

5
0

IN YOUR FACE, Linux and Apple fans! Oculus is Windows-only for now

Mikey

And you're all missing the loody obvious...

...Which is that in order to make a successfully viable product, you release it for a market that has the largest user-base for said product. There are more users running Windows that would consider buying something like this than there are running desktop Linux or MacOS, so it comes down to a simple question of economics. There is no sinister conspiracy to stop it being released on other OSes, merely the view to getting a higher volume of initial sales.

Unless Apple release a mac with the right specs from the get-go, or the average Linux machine stops being 2-3 generations behind current tech, those platforms will simply not be a priority due to the likelihood that they won't have the required hardware. Drivers will appear, but when, is up to them.

Until then, just be patient and wait your turn. You really want v1 of a product anyway?

6
2

US military SATELLITE suddenly BLOWS UP: 'Temperature spike' blamed

Mikey

Could possibly have been batteries overcharging, and subsequently going pop in a rather violent fashion. Other than the smaller possibility of any maneuvering fuel exploding as suggested above, I can't readily bring to mind anything else on a sat that would go bang in such a destructive manner.

1
0

ACHTUNG! Scary Linux system backdoor turns boxes into DDoS droids

Mikey

And yet the best part is...

...that almost everyone so far has merely scoffed at the very idea of a threat to Linux, and not once suggested that users should go and double check their software to make sure it's all as secure as can be. It only takes one new or clueless user to leave something open by accident and then, whoops, you're now part of the problem.

Of course, that that point no-one will offer any help or support, just merely scoff again and deride them for such a 'basic' mistake.

So, to make up for this... any and all intelligent sys-admins and users, do yourselves a favour, and go review your security settings. You can't be too careful now, can you?

9
6

Beam me up, Scotty, And VAPORIZE me in the process

Mikey

Not exactly secure...

Watching that video, it took me about 2 minutes to come up with the idea of monitoring the output from the motor controllers on your receiving end via an ADC, recording the result to an instruction file, and simply playing it back through a DAC, bypassing the original control circuitry.

What DRM?

Plus... it's a bit of a bad idea for sending people objects that are either mass produced (Just send the bloody thing to begin with) or things that are unique (I know! Let's destroy the original, and make an inferior copy out of plastic!)

Still, it's an interesting experiment, and may yet yield something practical from the playtimes of demented students.

0
0

Skinny Ubuntu Linux 'Snapped' up by fat Microsoft cloud

Mikey

You linux types are bloody weird, you know that?

You try for ages to convert us to a desktop OS that doesn't really give us all that much more than what we already use (think average user, not how you yourselves use it), then complain when the maker of an OS you like to slag off at every opportunity starts to utilise it in its own core business.

Are you rooting for the mass embrace of linux, or campaigning to keep it within its own niche area for good? Can't have both, I'm afraid.

Yeah, I'll get the downvotes, but at the same time, those same votes show I've touched on a nerve. So your call ;O)

15
8

The Pirate Bay co-founder exits jail, now, er, free to eat vegan food

Mikey

Re: Sue the prison?

Actually, that's a nice little incentive not to do something stupid and end up back in there.

Conversely, they could force all non-vegans to eat nothing but vegan food for their duration, and they'll all be too weak and listless upon release to do anything criminal!

1
3

This 125mph train is fitted with LASERS. Sadly no sharks, though

Mikey

Re: Good, but not good enough

I used to frequently see this beast, and it's loco hauled sister every time they passed my old depot in Reading, and the one thing they do well is the job they've (funnily enough) been designed to do. While I'm sure there are some good suggestions here and well meaning thoughts on the subject, your £200 equipment idea and the like isn't going to improve this already amazing marvel. Given the job it does, it does extremely well, they've got all they need it to do already. And if not? Well, they'll put top grade gear on it to improve it, not some arduino-based bodge from the shelves at Maplins.

I feel good it's not you lot running it, is all ;O)

As for the sonar option, the loco version does indeed have a small platform under one of the coaches that has a couple of ultrasonic wheels on it (gell filled wheels and transducers that can detect internal cracking and defects while in motion, up to about 40mph) which will be used in areas with suspected rail issues. After that, they send out the manual teams to get an even better picture of what the issue is. It's all covered, so don't you go trying to make it 'better' unless you designed it, y'hear?

Bloody IT types, always trying to 'improve stuff, I dunno... XD

15
0

Watch: DARPA shows off first successful test of STEERABLE bullet

Mikey

Re: DARPA: The Better To Murder You With, My Dear

@DerekCurrie

Hmmm, I can see why you think that, but then stop for a moment and think about why things like this do get developed.

If a single round can be used to pick off a strategic target with little chance of missing, then that one round is all that may be needed to bring about a cessation of conflict, rather than just destroying an entire building, block or town to eliminate a potential threat. A round like this actually has more possibility of saving lives from collateral damage than causing mass murder, which is a sobering thought.

And the other thing to consider if that think-tanks like DARPA usually produce many, many failures before they ever come out with something usable. These failures may then go on to become the basis for some rather tasty peacetime technology, with a purpose far removed from conflict or killing. The battlefield is the mother of innovation, and we have so many technologies developed for such a theatre. Superglue comes to mind, developed as a surgical adhesive to be used in an emergency in the field. There's a reason that the best things it sticks together are usually fingers...

So sure, war and conflict are ugly. But never forget that out of the crap, comes the good. Make sure you see both sides before decrying 'pointless' technological developments!

14
0

MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

Mikey

Re: MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

"let's take the heaviest objects ever built by man, and try and make them float!

You mean supertankers? You'll find they already do float, on account of them being ships and all.

And a floating nuke plant doesn't have to have all the vulnerable infrastructure above the waterline. Makes more sense to have the reactor vessel and support gear underslung and in the water already, in case things DO go pearshaped. Plus you've got more space on top for helipads, accomodation, etc.

Not too difficult when you think about it for more than 30 seconds ;O)

9
0

Intel bungs PC on an SD: Tiny computer for Internet of Things and wearables

Mikey

And yet, it's the 'gimmicky crap' that's the stuff that usually showcases the latest from the R&D boffins. While it may not be overly astounding to begin with, if enough interest is shown in these early designs, they'll get redeveloped, refined, and generally improved upon. This is, funnily enough, called progress.

And if no-one likes it? Well, that's fine, because not everything from an R&D department is going to be a solid gold winner. Designs don't perform as well as expected, aesthetics are not quite what people want, software can be buggy. It IS possible to make the mediocre better through PR (And that's my subtle reference to Apple for you, people) but if it doesn't prove popular, it'll vanish soon enough.

And it's surprising really, how much stuff from failed products gets reused in the next big development.

4
1
Mikey

The SD format does make sense from a 'one-size-fits-all' perspective, insofar that manufacturers of appliances and devices that would require such a card to operate only need to build in the cheaper host electronics, with the main system being easily added in later. You COULD solder it all on at creation, but then it may very well be cheaper to buy the finished card units in bulk and simply insert them later on, after loading in your own custom firmware. Economies of scale and the like.

Plus, prototyping would be easier, knowing you can just add the brains to your creation later, as long as you have the relevant mechanical interface.

1
0

Apple's secret 12.9-inch MONSTER needs a good fondle, say biz sources

Mikey
Coat

Maxi-Pads...

Well...

http://www.natracare.com/p92/en-GB/Natracare-Products/Maxi-Pads.aspx

Mines the one with the industrial sponge with the gluey battery, thanks.

2
0

Multipath TCP: Siri's new toy isn't a game-changer

Mikey

And what about the...

Battery life?

Granted, my phone is a gently aging Nokia N900 (and could probably do with a battery change anytime soon), but given the propensity for data-hungry connections over 3G, and almost anything over WiFi to consume battery power like a starving dog in a butchers shop, isn't this generally a bad thing?

Mobile devices are, by nature, limited in show long they can run due to the big chemical block sitting in the back. Having multiple radio emitters firing up and connecting all at the same time can't be doing wonders for the usage time figures. Pretty serious thing, when your battery is glued and screwed into your block of shiny fruit-plastic.

With the right resources, it's a good plan. But until we have usage time on battery into the 'days' figure, it's not going to do much more than sell a few more phone chargers, so people don't run out of juice halfway through the day.

0
0

Valve shows Linux love with SteamOS for gamers

Mikey
Joke

"SteamOS combines the rock-solid architecture of Linux with a gaming experience, as well as other oxymorons and contradictions. As soon as we find working drivers for proper hardware, it might actually become something people could possibly want, as soon as the Linux zealot community stop their fervant dribbling and putting off the normal people."

12
26

TWO can play this 64-bit mobile game, says Samsung, crossly

Mikey

Here we go again...

First off, it appears that whatever happens, the fanbois will only ever praise something if Apple does it first, which in this case, is the 64-bit thing. Should Samsung have done it first, they would have derided it as unnecessary. Now that Apple HAVE done it first, everyone else will now 'merely be copying them'.

He's been dead a long enough time, but it appears Old St. Steve is still spinning fast enough in his grave to keep the RDF fully powered up for another 5-6 years.

So... 64-bit CPUs in a phone. Practical? Who knows. Nice to have? Probably. Essential to the modern world? Not really, no. When all the world+dog seems to do on these things is text, call, peruse Farcebook and the like, and listen to music... very few people will ever seen any real-world benefits to this. That said, progress happens in odd ways. Just because it's no good to us right now, doesn't mean we won't be seeing things taking advantage of it later on. I'm just not convinced we're at a point where we need full desktop power in a battery limited device.

About the only real benefit to anyone is the manufacturer of these chips. If they can shift more of their designs to 64-bit, and drop the older architectures, they'll have less variants to keep track of, and can focus more on improvements and the like.

5
4

Qualcomm exec on eight-core mobile chips: They're 'dumb'

Mikey
Boffin

@Zola

"No, it's for when I drop my Smartphone into a mains powered dock and start running a full desktop OS. With all 8 cores going gangbusters on whatever tasks I'm performing on my full desktop OS"

Well, sure. This does seem to be the way things are headed and all. But one thing to consider here is heat. The more cores you have burning power, the hotter things will get. The phone/tablet casing can only sink away so much before things start to get out of tolerance, so the device itself will never quite reach proper desktop levels of grunt. Not unless you're happy to have a phone/tablet with a mounting point for a large external heat sink, which would require thermal paste and a large smooth surface to conduct the heat through.

I'd say we're due for a halfway house scenario, myself. Your device has your apps and files on it, and the base station has all the extra grunt required to go the full desktop monty, as well as all the peripherals and the like. To which end, we'll still need desktops of a sort, but at least you can hot-desk easily.

I'm looking forward to all the reports of trouser-fires from a full blown 8-core unit forced into 100% CPU utilisation via a nice piece of rogue software... hehehe.

2
0

Google Reader replacement 'Old Reader' crashes

Mikey
FAIL

Re: Data Management 101

Copying rather than moving is fine, but in this case the drives themselves went to crap, so either method would have ended up with the same result.

The main difference here is that it's easy to retrieve data with existing equipment or ressurect an old HDD with a board transplant, but with an SSD you're rather more buggered. You MAY somehow be able to read the flash if it's only the controller that's farked, with careful place ent of probes and an external controller. Good luck replacing any BGA chips though. Always back up an SSD to an HDD, otherwise things are going to be very, very expensive, very quickly...

I'll stick to my good old spinning rust for now, I think...

1
0

Page:

Forums