* Posts by Mikey

148 posts • joined 7 Sep 2007

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Windows Server 2016 persistent memory support supercharges storage IO

Mikey

Re: Reminds me of...

Man, I remember the i-RAM... Always wanted to get one, then saw how much it cost... unpopulated. I'd love a more up-to-date version that could hold a more meaningful amount of DRAM now, as battery tech and the cost of the DIMMs are much better than way back then. Mind you, you're only one extended power failure away from losing everything on it...

I do recall a similar drive that used a CF card and capacitors to back up the DRAM in the even of a power failure...

(One quick Google search later)

Aha! it was the ACARD ANS9010... And apparently they still make it. I may even see about getting one...

Edit: Never mind, still the same old one, and only uses DDR2... bleah. So much for that.

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My Nest smoke alarm was great … right up to the point it went nuts

Mikey

"Purple Alert! Purple Alert!"

"What's a purple alert?"

"Well, it's worse than a Blue Alert, but not quite as bad as a Red Alert..."

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Mikey

Re: Why would anyone have thought IoT was a good thing?

John, my question is less about the non-waterproof sensors on your car, but more about the fact that you'd be anywhere near Newbury in the first place...

That said, the bypass, with its current reputation as an impromptu Demolition Derby zone is also best avoided by anyone no in a tracked APC too. Stay on the M4, and try not to turn off into Reading either!

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Security man Krebs' website DDoS was powered by hacked Internet of Things botnet

Mikey

Are you feeling it now, Mr Krebs?

Seriously though, how long are we going to suffer all this hell of unsecured gadgets and a systems before we get something even remotely secure... (haha, geddit?)

Maybe someone should use such a network and go hit he designers systems, give them a taste of a problem of their own making, methinks?

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Oi, Apple fanbois. Your beloved Jesus Phones are pisspoor for disabled users

Mikey

Re: @ Jemma

Oh sweet merciful $DEITY, someone else who has one of those excellent little phones still! they were amazing, were they not? I still have mine knocking around for when I inevitably find a way to break my (now 6th) N900, and it still feels like a decent phone after all this time. It's such a shame Nokia created some wonderful and unique form factors, and then ignored them for the bland and boring 'candybar' format.

Still, a big thumbs up from me!

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Nork server blunder leaks Kim Jong Un's entire DNS – all, er, 28 .kp domains

Mikey

Yeah, if previous examples are anything to be going by, he'll certainly be bound to cop a load of flak...

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Apple seeks patent for paper bag - you read that right, a paper bag

Mikey

I can see it now...

The top of the bag won't actually have an opening in it to put things in, so it can be classified as a waterproof and courageous design, to herald in a new era of... something or other.

But you CAN buy the optional iOpener to allow backwards compatibility as needed, at the low price of only $29.99, but you can only put one thing in the bag at a time if you do.

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'Oi! El Reg! Stop pretending Microsoft has a BSOD monopoly!'

Mikey

That's pretty much the only reason I've seen any BSODs in the last... oooh, 6-7 years now? Despite the naysayers in the Lunatic Cult of The Swearing Penguin, it's a rare beasty indeed these days. I'd imagine most of any software related ones now come from legacy software that still has the magic touch...

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Pains us to run an Apple article without the words 'fined', 'guilty' or 'on fire' in it, but here we are

Mikey

Good, isn't it? I do recall (and just checked by testing it) that my rather ancient Nokia N900 (released back in Nov 2009) has stereo speakers in it. Pretty sure that the 7 having them is merely a sign that they've finally run out of reasons not to include a second one. The FM radio is a nice thing to have at times, and wouldn't you know it... it uses the headphones cable as the aerial!

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Mikey

Re: It's a bloody single function legacy adapter.

Single function, proven technology, simple and easy to use...

Of course, you CAN trade that in for Bluetooth, and drain both your phone battery AND that of the external sound device too, that's much better. Plus, you're giving up a tiny on-board connector for yet another sodding wall socket so you can have somewhere to charge up the lovely earbuds/speaker/whatever. You don't get rid of one functionality without impairing usage elsewhere.

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Intel's makeshift Kaby Lake Cores hope to lure punters from tired PCs

Mikey

Re: 70% over 2011 i5's

Amen to that, my 2500K currently bumbles along at 4.4GHz, and nothing has come close to stressing it yet. Good to see I'm not the only one out there! (Asus Sabertooth mobo, fwiw)

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More gums than Jaws: Greenland super-sharks live past 400 years old

Mikey

Re: Typical specimen is older than America

!In a more serious note, I don't think that calling USA's citizens "Americans " is correct or admissible, even if mostly everybody does it."

I thought the general usage these days was 'muricans? Or Yanks, that works too. Or, if they elect that orange potato-faced halfwit, 'Buffoons'...

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California to put all your power-hungry PCs on a low carb(on) diet

Mikey

So, PCs sold IN Cali, eh?

Ok, so you travel outside the state (On a plane! Eco friendly transport... er...) and then make the deal in a different, less mental state. Then, get the equipment shipped in (More fuel burned, well done Cali!) and voila, exemption to the loony rules.

I'm starting to think dehydration is making them prone to evermore insane ideas...

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Boffins unveil 500TB/in2 disk. Yeah, it's made of chlorine. -196˚C, why?

Mikey

Re: Cool, but...

Damn you, spoiling my fun there! Let me enjoy myself in the mornings, at least?

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Mikey

Re: Cool, but...

Yes, I see your point. But now explain to me how an SSD is a disk, even though that uses electrons to fill in tiny electron vacancies in semiconductors and unless possessed, really doesn't spin at all..?

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An anniversary to remember: The world's only air-to-air nuke was fired on 19 July, 1957

Mikey

Re: just goes to show how little ...

Hmm.

While the radiation produced directly from the explosion is relatively short lived, it'll still do a (considerably big) number on you, and you won't be living much longer than a few hours or days, depending on proximity to ground zero (Which, in the case of these rockets, you have a few miles of atmosphere between you and the detonation, so that's all the alpha particles and likely almost all of the beta gone too, so only a minor gamma burst to deal with... and none of what I'm about to write about next...)

The biggest issue is the material that gets sucked up as part of said explosion, and irradiated to produce the real fallout that goes on to cause much more long term damage than the initial explosion. This is the stuff that will prevent you from going back there for a good amount of time, or more likely cause long term problems and issues due to people going back and not understanding why it's so dangerous. Lots of those who went back to help those injured in the original bomb blasts in Japan succumbed to the secondary fallout radiation without knowing it

Not only that, but this material can spread in winds and rain, this was the major issue surrounding Chernobyl and the massive cloud of debris it produced, which was capable of scattering radioactive fallout for many thousands of square miles, potentially endangering huge amounts of the nearby population, even drifting towards Europe and causing havoc there.

The damage you're imagining is more than you think. Most wouldn't think dust and the like floating down would be harmful in that way, and by the time you know about it, it's too late.

As for your last point, obviously, it's hard to talk to anyone who has died from radiation, because... well, they're dead. Possibly buried in lead lined coffins too. Not hard to find though (not like they're going anywhere), just takes more effort than you want to put in because it's easier to make false blanket statements about things like this, contrails and moon landings than it does to simply state what you think.

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NASA curious about Curiosity's fourth 'safe mode' event

Mikey

Re: Crazy Clouds Hosting Advanced Operating Systems is a SMARTR Front AI Liberation ‽ .

Always something uplifting about the amount of sense your posts make first thing in the morning. Either that, or my tea needs to be weaker...

Have an up-vote, you magnificent bastard, and never stop posting!

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

Mikey

Re: Windows only for games.

That would mean them having to support masses of hardware configurations and drivers, products and other stuff that would all require certification before it would be allowed to set foot on the holy MacOS. And let's face it, it would cut into the profits of selling average hardware at silly markups, so it wouldn't do their bottom line any good.

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Mikey

Re: Games

Can't understand why you've got a downvote for that, because it's pretty much the reason I'm still with windows too, being mostly a gamer. CBA with Win10 until it's mandatory for whatever, and everything works fine as is.

I COULD use Linux, and I COULD bugger about with the whole WINE thing, but in doing so, I'll never get back the time spent faffing about making it all work the way it does already. The big problem I have is that, while yes it's free and all, Linux doesn't actually give me any advantages in my usage case. If anything, it'll cause more headaches than it would purportedly solve. Just saying that is going to get me downvoted, but to hell with it. Currently everything works, why mess with it?

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Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Mikey

@Flocke

Mostly they'll be from those who are firmly entrenched in the horrible mind-set of 'Anything Microsoft does is evil'. These are the same kind of people who are akin to those whose religious views are the be-all and end-all of everything, and nothing to the contrary can persuade them otherwise, no sir-ee.

I figure they're less pro FOSS, and just more for hating on a common target to feel like they're doing something useful. New Age Feminists and SJWs are waaaay behind, these guys have been doing it for decades!

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Mikey

Just another good example...

...Of how those in the Linux community want everyone to join in and contribute to their preferred operating system... except maybe them over there, we don't want them playing with it. And those over in that corner too, we'd rather not let them in. And anyone else that doesn't fit in with the preferred image of what a contributor looks like... What DOES one look like, anyhow?

This, my friends, is the flipside to open source, namely that anyone can contribute. ANYONE. Wasn't that one of the much flaunted points about the whole deal? And if a big company wants to throw its own, apparently totally reviewable code, into the ring as well... then why not? Isn't this where all those eyeballs reviewing the code (another much shouted about benefit to the whole FOSS thing) should pick up any nasties, and throw them out at that stage? Or will it be very few who bother to look, finding it far easier to just decry the whole things as evil and manipulative?

It's entirely possible that this could end up being a wonky attempt to take over an existing product, but I would warn against believing that to be the only reason for this. After all, it's not unknown for companies and people to change, even if it's usually glacial in speed. But I fear it's just a knee-jerk reaction to the fact that the main pet target for most of the ranty zealot types is now looking a bit more sympathetic towards the idea of Linux in general, and that irks them.

But then, how many movies and TV programs have had a supposed bad guy turn good at the last minute? It happens, people. At least respect the effort, even if you don't respect the entity.

(Cue down votes with no explanation. Or, if you're feeling charitable, provide a solid reason as to why you don't believe this might actually be a good thing!)

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ISS pump-up space podule fully engorged

Mikey

The important thing we need to know is...

...when struck by something sizable like a decent micro-meteor or bits of exploded Chinese satellite, does it compress comically, accompanied by the sound of someone squeezing an accordion hard?

And with that in mind, if we used these to connect various lengths of station together, especially the habitation sections... we could create the space-going equivalent of a bendy bus!

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Seagate ready for the HAMR blow: First drives out in 2017

Mikey

If I had the money to invest, I'd ensure it was invested in a disk company that also makes flash storage, because diversification is a smart move. Just like having said disk to back up that oh-so-precious chippery that is one controller failure away from total loss. Eggs and basket scenario, you see.

And yes, if I had the cash to do so, why not? I'd look for the right company that is also looking ahead, trying new technologies and seeing if they can squeeze yet more life out of existing tech so we can have greater capacities for less money. Give people the space, they'll use it. Drives break, people upgrade, disks get sold still. If the market is there, then you'd be daft not to cater for it.

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Mikey

Yes, because absolutely no-one wants or needs bulk data storage on cheap, easily replaceable media with the ability to recover the data on a duff unit using well proven methods. And certainly no-one needs this because this cloud thing isn't happening. And heavens forbid anyone has less than the budget to afford a stupidly fast and expensive bit of flash storage. I mean, all those people who just surf the net, read emails and look at cat pics and porn will be SO hampered using a mere spinny platter unit.

Or... you're just looking at it the wrong way. Maybe your phrase should have been "Why are they still making heavy goods vehicles when people are buying more and more cars?"

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Mikey

Ok, let's have a look...

1) Because it has absolutely nothing to do with software, modems or the era of mass dialup. So the only people who may get confused are those still refusing to move to broadband and have something of a fetish for the painfully slow data rates.

2) Because the tech industry NEVER reuses acronyms, ever. Did you have a go at Nvidia when they reused the term SLI from the olden days of the 3Dfx Voodoo 2? Because I think a few people got confused, then shrugged and went back to knowing the difference (Because it only took 10 seconds of reading to find out).

3) Because in this case, it actually works with the terminology. What else would you call it?

4) Because apparently you get easily confused over things like not letting go of the ? key after one character, so I guess you're allowed to be at this point.

5) Because I like lists.

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Microsoft half-bricks Asus Windows 7 PCs with UEFI boot glitch

Mikey

Re: and after disabling UEFI...

Or... just carry on using Win 7 like before. That's the easiest option, I would say. No formatting, faffing with other software, drivers, patches, troubleshooting when your already present OS works fine.

Occams razor, and all that.

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Hold on a sec. When did HDDs get SSD-style workload rate limits?

Mikey

S.M.A.R.T.

Sometimes May Actually Report Truthfully....

Some Marketing Arse Requested This...

Selective Metric Analysis Reduces Tolerance...

System Makes All Reliability Transient

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Nanoparticle boffinry could boost battery life

Mikey

Re: "faster charging and greater energy storage"

'Life' without a little bit of risk is called working for the HSE, if it can indeed be called a life...

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Toshiba notebook disk drive slims down. You like that, gamers?

Mikey

Re: I fail to see the point

Other than being over twice the price for less space, the SSD does have one issue that your standard spinning rust doesn't have. Namely, if the electronics fail on the HDD, the platters are still readable and recoverable, even down to the point of doing a simple board swap rather than sending it to recovery experts. The SSD however, if the controller on that goes bang... you have a lot of NAND chips sitting there with bits and bytes on them that are rather useless without the associated controller to know where everything is, thus necessitating a rather expensive trip to said experts. And given I've heard more SSDs going wonky recently than standard traditional drives, that could very well be a deal breaker for some people.

Of course, this drive would make an excellent mirror for your expensive SSD, wouldn't it? And for less than half the price too! Bargain!

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NASA injects cash into solar electric motor

Mikey

Re: I'm begining to suspect something is going on....

From my perusals on the pedia that is wiki, the main reason for using xenon is that it doesn't corrode and knacker your equipment in the same way that the old mercury ions used to.

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You won't believe this, but… nothing useful found on Farook iPhone

Mikey

Re: On the "stupiidity" of people

I would really, REALLY love to know where this was going, but it seems to have wandered off the path of rationality and into the soggy ditch of incoherence. What I THINK you seem to be saying, is that we like being in an ordered system, regardless of how badly it's being run. And that those who are good at leading will end up leading. That certainly didn't need a massive wall of unformatted test to say, however. Even amanfromars1 has a better grasp of paragraphs.

And after all that, what on earth has said comment got to do with the subject at hand? This is an article on how nothing important was found on a phone most guessed was useless, not a diatribe on the intricacies of human biology and social development.

You could have just said the FBI has idiots in charge, would have been MUCH easier to read and agree with!

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Microsoft lures top Linux exec from Oracle to Redmond

Mikey

Re: Oh dear...

Krypt, you're doing the same as John has, you've focused on things that are utterly insignificant to the end user. Code quality matters to those who write it, debug it, and document it. Not to those who never see it, or understand it, or care about it. If it works, and works well enough, that's all that really matters to the majority of users. So again, from a technical standpoint you're correct in the need for quality, but it's just not important if you're not a coder.

"Linux users know how to build tools..." - What, ALL of them? I can pretty much disprove that immediately, with something that'll shock you. I run Maemo on an N900, and I wouldn't have the first clue how to do that, much less need to. All the apps I need? I just (wait for it!) download and install, and wouldn't you know it, some are just plain crap. There are many apps and widgets in the various repositories, and about half to three quarters are just variations on the same things. A couple of media players, some hackneyed open source games with names that aren't quite the same as the proper version but invariably persist on keeping the ill-fitting 'open' part of the title, a few custom apps that will be of bugger all use to anyone other than the author and 3 mildly insane people (List of bell towers, anyone? Or an app to measure the correct steeping time for tea?).

It goes without saying, just because you CAN build apps and tools, doesn't mean they're going to be good, useful or necessary.

"The world is running more instances of Linux than anything else" - I'm not going to argue that, but I WILL point out that the vast majority of those will again never be seen by those who use the services of which they provide. All people want is the easy to use UI, or the web pages that server provides, or whatever service is provided. If the server kept popping up little notifications every now and then to say 'Hey! You're using something powered by Linux!', then relatively few will understand what that meant, and even fewer would actually care. It's on OS, it's not the universal panacea for all of mankind's ills and shortcomings that some seem to portray it as.

As for being naively optimistic, I'm sorry to burst your little zealot bubble, but I'm not pro-Microsoft. Sure, I use their stuff, but I'm not out there preaching all the benefits of anything they sell. Hell, I'm usually warning people against upgrading to a new version of Windows until it's been out for a while, and we can see what needs some attention to rectify whatever shortcomings and cockups there happen to be. I would wager that kind of thing even happens in the Linux world, although precious few would admit that. So reign in the vitriol and just be thankful you have a choice of what you'd like to use, and maybe let others have that same choice as well, even if it's not the one you'd prefer.

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Mikey

Oh dear,Johnny... you're looking at things from a very black-and-white viewpoint. And, most likely, from the usual technical standpoint of someone who is well versed in the intricate inner workings of software, most likely. That's not a bad thing, sure. But then, realise there are many, many more who haven't the slightest clue how the box of internets and email actually works, and those are the people who benefit from something familiar, something that can be found almost anywhere, something they understand.

No-one is 'bending' for anyone here. People will always go with what is familiar and comfortable for them, even if it's something that you personally dislike for whatever reason. Trying to get said people to change by ranting about how 'crap' something is largely unlikely to work, as most will (rightly or wrongly) dismiss you as a lunatic. However, if you were to sit down and actually show these people what you can offer them , instead of frothing rhetoric and sneered put-downs, they may actually listen and learn. However, you're currently being one of those people who used to put me right off the idea of using Linux due to the attitude you're presenting.

If you actually cared about the user, and not just about one-upping a large software company, you'd steer away from the ranty lunacy and try different tactics. That said, you're being said loony on a technical website were people already use what they like, so good luck with that, chum.

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Mikey

Oh dear...

I'm baffled, even after all this time, why people insist on defining anything Microsoft makes as 'shit'. Given that it's what a lot of people will pick up and use first when learning how to operate a PC, and given how many use it daily for home and work, as well as some of their other better products (mice and keyboards, certainly), it's certainly far from shit. It may not be the best, but there is worse out there, and you cannot pretend that in some cases, FOSS stuff is actually worse.

There have been waves of good and bad from that company, just as there has been from any project, company or individual. To slate it all as shit is ignorant at best, and rabidly fanatical at worst. I suspect a lot of it stems from people still bitter about the Linux desktop market being much smaller than they'd like, when they forget that the server segment is much more impressive. Linux has it's place, but the desktop is still not it for the masses, for the time being.

If you can bring yourself to focus on the good from all sources, then you'll appreciate what there is out there, and at the same time you can truly decry the real dross, but again from all sources. I freely admit that I'm only slowly starting to get more into the FOSS world myself, but that's mainly because of the rabid and unfriendly fans that put me off for many years. Still, I ignore them now for the narrow-minded fools they are, and carry on with using the best of whatever I can find.

Maybe you should do so as well? One less unpleasant ranting zealot in the world is one step closer to getting people to use Linux, and isn't that what you'd want?

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Who'd be mad enough to start a 'large-scale fire' in a spaceship?

Mikey

A little light Monday morning entertainment...

Twinkle twinkle, Little Pod,

All fired up now you've done your job!

Up above the world so high,

Oh bloody hell now it's ALL on fire!

Burning fiercely, Little Pod,

Oh balls, the transmitter isn't on...

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Fail0verflow GitHubs PS4 Linux loader

Mikey

Re: I just... why?

Firefox just seemed so godawful slow compared to MicroB, and I'll be honest, I haven't tried Opera yet because I'd actually forgotten it existed. The standard browser would be fine if it was just updated to run HTML5 properly, to be honest.

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Mikey

I just... why?

"A user who gets through all of this would end up either with a PS4 running Gentoo on the 4.4 kernel, or (more likely for most users) a bricked machine."

So, you go out, spend the money on a games console that can already do stuff like access the net, and then you either turn it into a malfunctioning lump, or put an OS on it that would have been more useful on a cheap, modularly upgradable PC that would cost the same amount or less. Other than bragging rights and epeen, I really and honestly fail to see what is to be gained by doing this. If it actually made it more useful, sure... but go back to the part about the PC being cheaper, upgradable etc.

Frankly, if you penguins are wanting to do something unusual, write a proper replacement browser for my N900 and its aging MicroB. Now THAT would be useful!

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Microsoft joins Eclipse Foundation. Odd thing for a competitor to do

Mikey
Facepalm

Re: Oh. Woo. Yay.

And what koolaid would that be? You missed the point entirely there, chap. They're a company (Like say, Canonical) that make software (Like say, Ubuntu), and like any other company, choose to diversify their product line in (hopefully successful) various other flavours and formats (Like say, Ubuntu Phone... no, wait...)

I'm not promoting them, but neither am I denigrating them. I'm just stating why they'd do such a thing, and at the same time, point out that the rabid lunatics with a persecution complex will always assume the worst in anything they do.

(And yes, the hidden satire there is that their own offering of Windows Phone isn't exactly flying off the shelves either. Thought I'd point that out before those who aren't aware of irony jump in and get all smug...)

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Mikey

Oh. Woo. Yay.

Eh, no surprise really. Microsoft is a software company, and they're branching into other areas of software. Yay. It's hardly unexpected, nor is it evil, monopolistic, nor unfair or wrong. Just a good business strategy of diversification like anyone else would.

Not that it'll stop the nutjobs claiming otherwise with nary a shred of proof of 'evil' intentions.

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Sub-atomic boffins glimpse four-pack tetraquark

Mikey

Oh god, it's a sad day for humanity if indeed our most basic particles truly are bouncing around this universe with labels written in comic sans...

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Linux lads lambast sorry state of Skype service

Mikey

Loving the irony

So what we have here, is a bunch of very vocal Linux users, most likely the very same who would be the first to denounce and decry any other form of Microsoft software, now crying out because the very software they would never go back to is unavailable, possibly because of the lack of people using it to begin with (due to the apparent mass migration to Linux, because Microsoft etc)?

And as for that wonderful tweet about "Microsoft making using Linux painful"... No, I'm pretty sure that the Linux coders have been making it painful for years long before anyone else took an interest. When techies write an OS for techies, it's going to be technical. It's only due to the recent efforts by those who could see the potential monetary value in making it more accessible to the majority of end users (Ubuntu springs readily to mind here) that ease-of-use has become a major factor.

Lastly, there are more than likely going to be dozens of FOSS projects revolving around making a better alternative to the 'Evil Proprietary Micro$haft EevilEvilBadBad' out there already. Just get the community to rally around the best one, polish it up, and present it as a cross-platform, highly usable and FREE alternative and voila. Another choice. I know, I know... it's harder to do that than complain, and it DOES involve trying to get many disparate coders to unify in one coherent and well-planned project, but IF that can be accomplished, wouldn't that be better for everyone as a whole?

Or else just use something like TeamSpeak, Mumble or Discord. Free, easy to use, cross platform, blah blah blah.

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Nasuni sees cloud killing on-premises storage

Mikey

Hmmm... if the cloud is doing away with local storage... does that mean all the software and data for running the cloudy barn is actually stored elsewhere on someone else's cloud? Will there one day be the cloud infrastructure, but no actual hardware powering it all? THESE are the things which barely keep me awake during the day.

1
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QLogic: Ready to get excited about an Ethernet adapter?

Mikey

Awesome!

Yeah, I can't wait to get a couple of these babies when the availability of 100Gbit internet connections become the norm! And, given the timeframe of THAT happening, I have plenty of time to actually save up for them too... assuming I live to see the year 3000...

3
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Linux Mint hacked: Malware-infected ISOs linked from official site

Mikey
Happy

Re: The feel when the discussion reminds one of the Amiga vs. Atari ST days of retardation

Pffft, everyone knows the Amiga was the better of the two any day!

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Mikey

"What's the betting the hacker's IP address is in a range owned by M$?"

Precisely sod all, one would imagine. Really, what would they have to gain from doing that, given the market share of PCs running mint is miniscule in the grand scheme of things? I know you unwashed lot love to portray them as evil-minded, underhanded ratbags with an over-riding mission to eliminate all things from St Torvalds himself, but that's completely batshit bonkers. Pretty much up there with chemtrails and all those free energy contraptions.

The simple fact here is there was a webserver set up by some halfwit who left it vulnerable, and it got compromised. It happens all the time, all over the place, and there is nothing to suggest that just because it happens to run the all-hallowed Linux that it's inherently immune to such things. I do worry about you lot, because sometimes it feels like you've been conditioned to trust FOSS implicitly without using the normal security and setup procedures. It's software, it can go bad on you, it's always a risk. No matter the vendor.

Macolytes and Linux Zealots have been taking the piss for years. Then the Macolytes felt the sharp sting of vulnerability, and now... now it's the turn of the Zealots. Maybe now you'll see we're all in the same boat?

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Roll up, roll up to the Malware Museum! Run classic DOS viruses in your web browser

Mikey

Re: I suppose a lot of us would like to know...

@mikey - have a look in $Windows.~BT - you will find a nice winbloat file that is waiting for you to upgrade to w10 whether you want to or not.

You mean the one I got rid of as soon as I found it, and knew what it was for? Yes, I removed the cached data for the upgrade, no different to any other downloaded and as-yet-uninstalled update in principle. Sure, the delivery method was underhanded, but an update is all it ever was.

And now it's not. Good computer management, you see. Take steps to secure, remove, patch and protect.

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Mikey
Facepalm

I suppose a lot of us would like to know...

...What exactly IS this 'winbloat' you're on about? Kinda sounds like some weird prank program, or maybe a Mr Creosote simulator. Whatever it is, I guess I hope it doesn't show up on my install of Win 7. Thankfully, that has some semblance of a firewall, and a semi-useful malware checker.

But no, you can't mean Windows. That DOES come with some security, even if the rest is up to the user to provide. And that's a good thing, I think, having the freedom of choice on that. Certainly choice seems to be a tennet of that peculiar kind of rabid open source lunatics, so choice MUST be a good thing!

Right?

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Head transplant candidate sells souvenirs to fund operation

Mikey

Re: Body transplant

Because when you look at it, the brain is the command center for the body. If it works, then in theory it's like getting a different car (I hesitate to say new, as who knows what condition the next one will be in. If it's anything like mine, not even WeBuyAnyCorpse would give me a tenner for it...)

So yes, you're putting the control section on another body. Pretty sure the heart has no feelings either way when it comes to getting a new home and being alive again, but the noggin certainly does.

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How a power blip briefly broke GitHub's boxes and tripped it offline

Mikey
Joke

Re: The bigger question is why they rebooted

The more likely reason when you realise what OS they run is that it's all obsolescent hardware running on the cheap, because you don't need top-of-the-line when running Linux, right?

All joking aside, I'm kinda surprised there was no backup power available, you'd think a datacentre would have that as a basic provision. At the very least have an in-rack UPS unit that would start a graceful shutdown in such an event. But then, hindsight is always late to the planning party is it not?

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Little warning: Deleting the wrong files may brick your Linux PC

Mikey
Coat

Just an observation...

...but when you have a system that allows you total power over your machine, you should be too surprised when such consequences arise, expected or not. If you're going to wield such ability, you need to be prepared for the worst, no matter what system you use. Otherwise, you're shooting in the dark with no recourse to the inevitable ricochet.

See, I know this is a dangerous thing to post, I know I'm going to get downvotes, I fully expect that. I already have my coat on, and will be laughing all the way out :O)

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