* Posts by Bronek Kozicki

1371 posts • joined 6 Sep 2007

Page:

If you installed Windows 10 and like privacy, you checked the defaults, right? Oh dear

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Guess I'll stick to 7 until 2020...

The funny thing about systemd, I actually like unit files and few other things it brought strictly related to initialisation management. It is really big shame that it's put its fingers into so many pies, e.g. when dbus goes wrong (sometimes it does!) I am unable to gracefully shutdown the system because silly bugger is unable to communicate with init process without dbus.

On the other hand, it does provide some entertainment, watching all these bone headed-attempts to move dbus to kernel, in a least efficient way possible. I wonder what systemd and gnome authors will try to copy from Windows next, badly (Cortana a.k.a. "universal privacy invasion", perhaps?) Sorry for off topic, I heading out anyway

4
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: It's pretty bad... Really

I suppose you could set a policy to enforce settings, i.e. store the right data in registry. Still, thanks for sharing where to put it! I suspect I might need this, one day ...

3
0

Peering closer at 3D XPoint memory: What are Intel, Micron up to?

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Missed one mystery

Yes it is, makes it really good candidate for write cache. You won't be able to run general purpose software directly on this memory though, due to endurance limit (very high, but still). Unless you clasify "firmware" as "general purpose" ;)

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: layer limit

Good point, however: experience so far points that evolution of fabrication processes is very focused on increased yields. Which makes sense, since this is where economy of silicon fabrication comes from. There is no reason to think this should be any different for either of V-NAND or 3D XPoint. Thus I would expect stacking (of both) to slowly increase, perhaps in 2 or 3 years cycle, until some other limit is hit (e.g. current needed to support more layers).

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: And NO software changes

This is no NVRAM, you cannot simply use as RAM any technology which has any endurance limit. No matter if its 1000x larger than NAND. This is "merely" another tier in write cache of your regular data storage, or at best (and I'm thinking that's a niche product - see ZeusRAM) actual data storage.

0
0

Just ONE THOUSAND times BETTER than FLASH! Intel, Micron's amazing claim

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Manufacturing capacity

This probably won't do anything bad to 3D Flash. This technology is more expensive that NAND, you are not going to get economy of scale with imaginary terabyte-sized drives in this technology (without of flash). What you might get instead is terabyte-sized drives made with 3D Flash and with insane write speeds/IOPS thanks to large (tens of GB) write buffer in XPoint.

2
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: hmm

If XPoint is going to be used as "cheaper and non-volatile" DRAM then it does have endurance problem. This can be made manageable by memory controllers, but that's another step to increased memory latency.

What we have now appears to be simply another tier for large, fast and safe buffer of NAND writes (article does mention NVME on PCIe), which is great but it does not exactly warrant abandoning research into DRAM replacement technologies.

For example, if such "DRAM replacement" technology (e.g. memristor) had latencies at two orders of magnitude lower than current DRAM (and apparently XPoint), it would enable immense jump in CPU (and GPU) performance by dropping the requirement for cache (see The Platform).

3
0

Lottery IT security boss guilty of hacking lotto computer to win $14.3m

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

watch this space

They guy seem guilty but the evidence seem to be lacking. I am sure we will hear more about this.

6
0

UK.gov makes total pig's ear of attempt to legalise home CD ripping

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Much more Moore's Law, as boffins assemble atom-level transistor

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

I would guess it is not that small. Size of single phthalocyanine molecule is apparently around 1nm, I would guess that what we have on the picture is not actually smaller than 10nm.

2
0

Here's why Whittingdale kicked a subscription BBC into the future

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: A TV tax based on income?!

I guess it goes like this : you stop paying BBC directly and instead BBC is subsidised, to the tune of £4bln, from your taxes. Well, they might not admit it, but this is how it would end up at the end.

1
1
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Flame

bollocks

... reluctant to increase the cost of the BBC for the middle classes who most use it, but who are currently subsidised by low income license fee payers

numbers or it didn't happen. Just a reminder, a middle class is someone who can afford monthly subscription to Sky or Virgin Media, and thus is not limited by free terrestial TV.

Also, paying same price for same service hardly seem "subsidising" to me, I guess some Guardian reader must have put this sentence for you?

12
2

Pray for AMD

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Hardware manufactures futures in Microsofts hands...

Good point; for one I cannot wait to get my hands onto unholy duo of Radeon Fury X2 and Windows 10 ;)

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

there is still hope for AMD.

1. IBM is making inroads into 7nm process, in partnership with Global Foundries, and we may expect first production chips in this process in 2018 (although 2019 seems more likely)

2. Global Foundries is the manufacturer for AMD chips

3. Intel has slipped 10nm process until 2017 and will certainly slip 7nm beyond 2018

4. AMD has invested into ARM which is starting (slowly) to make inroads into servers, where Xeon is currently king

4
0

Neil Young yanks music from streaming services: 'Worst audio in history'

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

lossless streaming is joke

Qobuz, stream in lossless formats at CD quality

If you listen to soprano parts on "Mozart: Messe En Ut Mineur" by Philippe Herreweghe, on Qobuz, you will hear nasty (and very obvious) clipping. I don't know about Tidal, they probably do not have this record anyway. Original CD does not have any clipping (I have it).

I would guess that lossless streaming services have entered the loudness war (or perhaps they were always there, I just failed to notice before). For me that was reason enough to cancel my subscription. For music I really like I still buy CDs, thanks.

I do subscribe to Spotify for casual listening, and I do not have expectations of great quality, or even great choice.

2
0

Former spook bigwigs ask for rewrite of UK’s surveillance laws

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Megaphone

Re: "there cannot be "no go" areas"...

As I would consider any conversation in the privacy of my home.

Yes I understand spooks may get a warrant to bug me - let them, but they still need to bother with 1. judicial supervision 2. actual effort placing targetted bug. There must be no shortcuts for these two, that's what this is all about.

20
0

Pluto Pic: Is it a DOG? Is it a HEART? Or is it ... is it ... BIGFOOT?

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Megaphone

it's head of Donald Duck, obviously

0
0

Microsoft nixes A-V updates for XP, exposes 180 MEEELLION luddites

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: People still use Vista?

"as long as they aren't hurting anyone else..."

That's the trouble with all these unpatched machines connected to Internet. They do not intentionally hurt anyone else, but these hordes of zombie PCs have very real use to criminals. I am toying with the idea that harm by negligence should be applied to owners of such computers, but of course since law is only applied locally it wouldn't help much anyway...

11
3

Microsoft kills TWO Hacking Team vulns: NOT the worst in this Patch Tues either

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Pint

you've got to love it

El Reg tells me there's an Windows update coming my way, before Windows does. There is also Flash update I neglected by a day and another Adobe Reader update, and then also QuickTime and Thunderbird on one of the computers but not on the other (must have installed it earlier). Apparently Secunia PSI does not update software by itself and I still need to run the updates myself, perhaps I should try the CSI or maybe move to Ninite, which unfortunately does not support as many programs as Secunia does.

And so I stay up until midnight patching my both Windows machines, and am almost late for work today. But at least my machines are updated, and updating kernel to 4.0.8 and bunch of other software running on Linux hypervisor on the same occasion went smoothly.

Thank you, El Reg.

2
0

Benchmark bandit: Numascale unveils 10TB/sec monster

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Old chip

Intel Xeons supported cache coherent NUMA for last 6 years or so (reference)

1
0

Cool-headed boffins overcome sticky issue: Graphene-based film could turn heat down

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Yup exactly, that's what is interesting about this technology - removing heat faster and more efficiently from inside the chip will make it work at lower temperatorus, that is more efficiently. Faster GPUs, CPUs and memory - ahoy!

But, as I wrote aboute - we have no idea when this will come to fruition (if ever)

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

That's interesting, but of course this being research there is no way to tell how many years are we from commercial applications (if at all)

1
0

How a Cali court ruling could force a complete rethink of search results

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Funny thing, Amazon does exactly this for majority of search terms. I guess "MTM" received special treatment and that is not cool.

1
0

BB10 AND Android? How BlackBerry can have its cake and eat it

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Their ambition is rubbish...

Android is Dalvik JVM with native bits (supported on BB10) and Google Play services (not in BB10, yet). Without those, B10 phones can and do run large selection of Android apps at native speed (which is not very fast, because of JVM overhead)

The thing is that BB10 security model is much better than that of Android and also that many BB applications (calendar messages etc) are better than in Android. They do not support kitchen-and-sink integration but they integrate well enough with external world, and they are also very well integrated with all other apps and settings of the phone.

Basically the whole article is about plans to improve support for Android apps within BB10 which is nothing special and is consistent with BB strategy until now. There is no suggestion that BB would cease to support BB10 or pull its apps, and that would be nonsensical thing to do anyway because it would remove at least two huge selling points of BB phones: better security and better PIM apps

2
0

Evil NSA runs on saintly Linux, Apache, MySQL

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: No need for that

Good comment. One thing though - it is not as if Snowden could verify that his knowledge is up to date before releasing this information, right? It is quite possible that NSA came to same conclusion some 2 years ago and already took steps to improve the security of their network. Possibly by ditching autofs.

0
0

ONE MILLION new lines of code hit Linux Kernel

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Rather scary

These headers have been "auto generated from AMD internal database." (source : commit comment). There is no point reviewing those.

But I do understand why one might want to do it.

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: One MEEELION lines…

@Tomato42 admittedly it's a little bit funny, but it's true (so , not joke)

2
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: 410,000 lines in the AMD register description header?

yeah and these all are headers. My guess it's "magical" consts and structures recognized by AMD GPU which until now lived only in proprietary AMD driver sources.

1
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

So, I had a look at that single large commit (removed 9,838 ; added 453,818 lines) in 4.2-rc1 and it's interesting one, here, because of the following 2 new drivers:

  • virtio-gpu KMS only pieces of driver for virtio-gpu in qemu. This is just the first part of this driver, enough to run unaccelerated userspace on. As qemu merges more we'll start adding the 3D features for the virgl 3d work.
  • amdgpu a new driver from AMD to driver their newer GPUs. (VI+) It contains a new cleaner userspace API, and is a clean break from radeon moving forward, that AMD are going to concentrate on. It also contains a set of register headers auto generated from AMD internal database.

This is going to be useful.

4
0

Yank my blockchain: Bitcoin upgrade SNAFU borks hungry miners' currency

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Facepalm

Reading stories like this one I would think that there ought to be some incentive for signed email, too. Apparently not ...

0
0

Let me PLUG that up there, love. It’s perfectly standaAAARGH!

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Joke

bullshitter with his 3D kitchen design

... hmm, I have this nice idea ...

0
0

North America down to its last ~130,000 IPv4 addresses

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: The market in operation

@AC double-NAT thanks for providing an example of what I was referring to.

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

its your router dishing out IP addresses not your OS.

No it's not. Too much trouble when host can generate valid IPv6 address itself. Router may (but does not have to) give network prefix.,

1
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: 2 things wrong with IPV6

IPv6 is not "too big", you "only" get space for some 2^48 public networks. The remaining bits are for internal networks (2^16) and then for individual hosts (2^64). It is a lot yes, but it gives good amount of space for a well organized public network structure with (hopefully) much smaller BGP tables.

3
2
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: The market in operation

That's too optimistic.

There is (almost) no market for IPv4 addresses and these cannot be freely traded (yes, there is some trade in IPv4 addresses but it is very limited). Also, once a vendor owns a range of IPv4 addresses, there is no ongoing cost of using it and there is no serious proposal to change it (although I would support such a change - after all, I pay to my ISP monthly).

What needs to (and will) happen is increased deployment cost of IPv4, due to increasing network complexity forced by handling of various (static or dynamic) NATs at network stages where previously they were not used. But it will be very slow process.

1
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

@AC Privacy

Honestly, you could have researched a bit before posting here. There is Privacy Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in IPv6 proposed standard (from 2001) which next evolved to draft standard (from 2007). These are widely implemented and available both on Windows and Linux (didn't BSD because I'm not your researcher)

5
5
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

There is nothing wrong with IPv6 and it has been "released" many years ago. Yes it had some improvements over the years, but that's steady evolution which happens to any Internet protocol, not just IPv6.

The problem is with applications/appliances which do not properly support IPv6 (thus forcing users to IPv4), because their respective vendors do not have a clue. For example, finding good SIP phone with IPv6 support is tricky etc.

Hopefully when American ISPs are forced to join 21st century and give IPv6 to users, that will in turn prompt software/hardware vendors to give this protocol more consideration. But I won't hold breath, probably a whole generation of software/hardware/network engineers has to die out first. Still, there is a good chance this will happen before end of 21st century ...

3
6

Congratulations! You survived the leap secondocalypse

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Alternatives

@Martin it's already decoupled, although they need to be somehow synchronized because you need (and will always need) to be able to perform conversion between the two. What you call Astronomical Time is actually Atomic Time, called TAI and what you call Earth Time is various timezones, all relative to UTC. Leap second is just one possible synchronization mechanism when one wants to keep the conversion between TAI and UTC simple. It is possible to imagine different mechanisms.

As for base-60 , well you do not have to use it. Everyone knows that counting number of seconds from midnight UTC of 1st January 1970 is perfectly accessible and universally accepted measure of time. Right?

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Alternatives

I would say:

* make it like daylight changes only on Sat/Sun night (no less often than once a year, no more often than twice a year), e.g mid June and mid Dec

* also standardize very specific time window and slew procedure (say, one hour 00:00UTC - 01:00UTC) to be applied by all NTP servers and by all machines maintaining their own time

* anyone who really cares about precise time will apply TAI anyway

* from standarized slew procedure, accurate relation between TAI and UTC can be derived at any point during slew window (as well as after and before)

Weak point of my proposal that conversion between TAI and UTC will be more complex than it is now (due to slew), but it standarizes current practice and by virtue of this standarization it makes time between different sources comparable again. If exercised often enough, the kinks will be ironed out eventually.

2
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: All is not well, though

Interesting reading in this github thread.

Does anyone else understand NTP:

Open Source projects are of course particularly welcome to use the pool in their default setup, but we ask that you get a vendor zone when using the pool as a default configuration.

... to mean that they ask open source projects to register as a vendors, after which they are welcome to use their (vendor) pool? Or is it just my flawed understanding of the referred quote?

2
0

Amazon just wrote a TLS crypto library in only 6,000 lines of C code

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: s2n != OpenSSL

... is not perfect but it has the benefit of having gone and is going through the mill ...

How I hate excuses like this. The fact that something has been used a lot should not be confused with quality. If anything, repeated findings of really embarrassing bugs should set all the red flags - as something that habitually has been and still is kept to a very low standard.

5
0

It's all downhill from here: Avalanche spins STT-RAM

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Oh great...

There is much bigger problem since all current memory architectures make lots of distinctions between filesystems and RAM. Some of these distinctions will have to go (imagine filesystem optimized for low latency RAM) but some will remain (it is not convenient to have persistent memory only).

0
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

"draws little power" - how much exactly? "enormous market opportunities due to its speed and endurance" - not specific enough, again!

1
0

Intel infosec folk TEE off open source app dev framework

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge
Trollface

coming next ...

... new generation of viruses written for mobile devices with intel CPUs, self-installing in TEE

1
0

Microsoft to release Visual Studio 2015 ahead of Windows 10

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Subscription model for VS2015

Unless you are using it in mid-size or larger commercial deployment, community edition is all you will need.

It now comes with very liberal licensing (also allowing for small commercial deployments) and all the bells and whistles you previously had to buy MSDN for.

3
0
Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: ASP on Linux?

I won't be using it any time soon because web application are not my cup of tea, but if I had to deploy, write or maintain one, then ASP .NET running on Linux would be much preferred over this junkyard called PHP

6
0

Why SpaceX will sort out Sunday's snafu faster than NASA ever could

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: The Culture

I think the opposite, now they can borrow this name.

2
0

Samsung vows to stop knackering Windows Update on your laptops

Bronek Kozicki
Silver badge

Re: Tame hardware driver

@Stuart Exactly my point, taken to logical conclusion.

0
0

Page:

Forums